table saw form factors...

I don't know of a way to search saws online by particular specs, so I thought I'd draw on the collective experience of the Wreck to help me target specific models for research.
I've just finished reworking my shop to make room for my new toys (mini lathe, scroll saw, baby bandsaw, half-assed shop vac DC). Once I get a new (or used), better quality table saw, my little wood shop won't lack for much of anything machinery wise.
I'm thinking of getting it at tax refund time, and I'm thinking it's a good idea to start doing my homework now, so I know how much to budget. My absolute ceiling is $1,000. SWMBO thinks I'm going to get it for $500... You can see where I'm going with that. No more than a grand complete, and as close to $500 as I can get without buying something that won't last me 10 years.
I'll be looking at (hopefully) contractor's saws that can run on 110V. I can't do 220V yet. I need to solve a lot of problems first, and I'm impatient. I want the saw in 2004, and I'll redo the electric in 2005, after which I'll be able to run it on 220V.
So...
The maximum space I can allocate is 48" W x 36" D. Does that sound like your contractor's saw? I don't have a clear idea in my head how big they get. If they're bigger than that, I may have to go with a better benchtop or a BT3100.
Something on the ligher side would be helpful. I will have to pull it out from the wall frequently, occasionally turn it 90 degrees, and rarely take it all the way out into the yard. Something I can scoot 3-4' by myself without blowing out my back would be good. If I have to put a mobile base on it, that needs to factor into the maximum $1,000 price ceiling. It's OK if I have to go get a neighbor to help me carry it out.
If it has wings, that's no bad thing so long as I can set it up without them. I'll have a larger shop some day, and I expect this saw I'm buying to be the one I put into it. Something I can run as small as possible now and make wider later would be good.
Form factor is the #1 consideration, operating voltage #2, and #3... I don't want to suffer with a crappy fence ever again. I want a saw that's born with a good fence, or else I want to buy a saw with no fence and buy a good aftermarket one. I haven't been looking at or paying attention to fences, since nothing will fit my current POS. I could use some nudges in that area too.
Much obliged, folks. Happy holidays!
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silvan thus spake:

How about a General 50-185-M1 Left Tilt Builders Saw.
$649 plus shipping. Runs on 120 and 240ac, nice motor that won't kick your 120 breaker constantly.
http://www.general.ca/product/inter/50175an.html
I've been looking this one over as well.
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg G. wrote:

Looks like it deserves a place on my list for sure. Since made in USA is probably impossible, made in Canada is better than made in Chiwan. Price leaves room to accessorize a bit...
300 pounds though. Hooo boy. I guess they all weigh about that. This could get intersting. The whole shed, er, shop wobbles when I move my 15" DP from side to side. I probably need to replace some of the floor, and shore it up.
Well, I just have to factor that into the equation. The size barely works. If I absolutely have to, I can probably put my metal-cutting bandsaw in the den to make more room. The den is mostly wasted space, and metal cutting isn't dusty, and I don't do it that much anymore. SWMBO wouldn't like that, but she'd probably like that better than putting up a new building.
And so it begins... :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silvan writes:

Tain't made in Canada, either. The International line is Taiwense, maybe even Chinese.
Charlie Self
"Man is a reasoning rather than a reasonable animal." Alexander Hamilton
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charlie Self wrote:

But, but, what about all the little maple leaf flags all over that page? "This web page made in Canada" ? :)
Dunno. The more I look, the more I doubt I can afford/fit one of these things anyway. Having looked at real specs, they're all a bit bigger and a *lot* heavier than I figured.
I feel like I might go through my floor any day now at 200 pounds. Adding another 300 to that is asking for problems.
I guess it all comes back to the BT3100 I keep trying with all my might to resist. Aluminum is looking like the way to go.
(Or until I score something used. :)
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silvan said:

Actually, it's made in Taiwan. The FENCE is made in Canada. Look at the strategic placement of the flag... Misleading, eh? The fence is a beis clone.

I didn't know you were working in an outhouse. <g> Bulk is generally a *good* thing in a table saw - it has those nice cast table extensions. Not an aluminum waffle plate that eats your fingers, pencils, and wood chips, jamming the material you are trying to put through the saw.

But you could put up a small building yourself - even a lean-to? And just think of how much you would enjoy it! Insulation, heat, power, and tools, tools, tools... <g>
Good Luck with whatever you choose.
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Greg G. wrote:

Ah. Sneaky.

Just about. It's pretty rickety.

Yeah, I hate my aluminum waffle plate.

I have heat now. No insulation. A building is in the cards for someday, but I have no place to put one except for where the current one is sitting. I'll have to move all my stuff into the house somewhere, tear that one down, build a new one... It will mean probably a couple of months with no workshop. I'm not looking forward to it.

Sadly, after a dose of practicality hit me, I'm thinking I really can't afford or make room for this, no matter how much I want to.
I guess I will do the only reasonable thing after considering all the circumstances, which is to get a BT3100 and learn to like the silly sliding table thing.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Dec 2003 19:28:57 -0500, Silvan

[snip]
Silvan, you seem like a dumpster diving more time than money type of guy. Look around for an old Delta contractors saw. They are pretty much indestructible from what I've seen. Worse case it needs new bearings and some TLC which a handy guy can do in a few hours and with a little imagination. Saws like that go for a hundred bucks now and then. At an auction a while back one went for $50. Forty more for new bearings all around and then a decent fence and you are set for a few years. I believe it will meet all your requirements. Of course if you really need it now or have your heart set on something new and scratch free then disregard. My 2 cents worth.
Merry Christmas & Happy Holidays for you and the family. -- John, in Minnesota
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John, in MN thus spake:

I wish it were true. I have watched the local Atlanta paper for months and haven't seen a thing! I think they get nabbed up before they ever hit the paper...
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
John, in MN wrote:

Translation: Silvan, you seem poor and/or broke.
I resemble that remark. :) I sure could use the money elsewhere, that's for sure.

How big are they, roughly? My 48" x 36" is really an optimistic maximum. If they're a tad smaller than that, that would be good.
I'll keep my eye out for a fixer upper. Maybe start reading the Trading Post. Too bad I don't have any guns, or I could probably get a saw for free.
"1969 Hemicuda. MS MT A/C runs good. Rusty. $10,000 or will trade for guns."
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Silvan said:

But what about TOOLS!
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Well, in the criteria you described, you just have to include the barebones version of the Jet Supersaw. It will barely fit into all your criteria. That's because its a heck of a lot more saw than a contractor's saw. Oh, when I say barely, were you counting the Rip Fence handle in your maximum dimensions? Its 4" long and causes the depth of the saw to go to about 38 inches.
I'm not claiming this saw is small cabinet saw, but its a smooth operator. It passes the so-called nickel test for smoothness. Yes, its heavy with two solid cast iron wings. But its very moveable using a mobile base. I have the fully kitted saw with sliding table and 52" fence/extension table on a mobile base. I can move it by myself without any unusual strain, even though it weighs over 350 pounds. However, I liken it more to docking a battle ship, than parking a VW bug, since its long.
If you want to cut wood smoothly and precisely, this saw must be considered in your choices.
Also, please buy from a local dealer, if you have that option. You'll get knowledgeable double support - from Jet factory as well as the local dealer, something you can forget if you buy from Lowe's or Home depot. I must admit I am spoiled by having an exceptional dealer in my area. Buying from them was part of the influence in my purchase choice.
Bob

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Bob Davis said:

I'm not saying that you shouldn't consider the SuperSaw, along with any others that may fill your needs. But that particular Jet saw, with it's pretty hefty price tag, has a couple of shortcomings you should be aware of. The mechanism is a from a contractors saw, not a table saw and the dust port is so-so. But the biggest objection I have are the belts which move the arbor break fairly often, and Jet (was) not getting them out very fast. There is no generic replacement I am aware of.
FWIW,
Greg G.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.