Table Saw Fence Accuracy - (Yes, I Googled)

Hi Everyone,
I've done my due diligence with a Google search, but since I'm so new to this world I'm not sure I understand what I'm reading.
Okay, to the point...
I'm considering the purchase of a modestly priced table saw such as the Grizzly 1022 series. What is a reasonable expectation for accuracy of the standard fence on a quality machine, specifically with regard to it being parallel to the blade?
I will not be doing super precise work so I'm less concerned about the width scale, but in my opinion, a table saw fence is useless if it does not reliably clamp to parallel within a few hundredths of an inch over the length of the table.
Am I going to have to buy a top-end fence to get there? I truly feel that if I have to manually adjust the angle of the fence for every set-up, then I might as well stick with the circular saw for my current work.
This is a great group. Thanks for helping this newbie along.
Tom Murphy
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I don't have a grizzly saw, but you will have to, most likely, adjust the saw to parallel to the fence when you get it home. After that, it should be fine and you will need to tune it every once in a while after that. My 2 cents.

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The blade needs to be parallel to the near edge of mitre slot. The fence should taper away from the mitre slot by about 1/16 inch. The Forest rep (at the woodworking show, says the outfeed of the fence, at the blade, shoud be .003" further from the blade than at the infeed edge of the blade. The blade should not cut on the up side, or burn the wood. Align the blade to the table first, Dan

Colorado Springs, CO My advice may be worth what you paid for it.
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If your fence is anything but parallel, it WILL cut on the upside. With it towed out as you describe. it will cut on the back on the waste side of the stock.
. The blade should not cut on the up side, or

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On Thu 04 Dec 2003 04:34:11p, tom snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Tom Murphy) wrote in

I have a Griz 1022, and unless they've improved it within the last year or so, yes, you have to check the fence every time you move it. Before I put the Vega fence on it I followed DJ Delories' advice and kept a rule handy. Half-clamp the fence, check the distance from the fence to the nearest miter slot at the front, check it again again at the back. Most of the time it was off by a little bit. A sixteenth or so. It was easy to tap it into line then fully clamp the fence tight and then it stayed right there. Other times it was dead on. But the Vega fence is dead on, every single time.
I believe you can get the Griz contractor's saw - I don't think they make the 1022 anymore, they've started selling that saw, slightly modified, under a new number - with a Shop Fox option. I've heard good things about that fence. Not great, but good.
But yeah, I don't believe you can trust the standard Griz fence to always be within a few hundredths of an inch front to back, no matter how long you mess with the adjustments. It works fine if you keep an eye on it, but I don't consider it to be a "move it and clamp it" fence.
Others might have different opinions. :-)
Dan
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That pretty much answers the question. A quality fence that is properly adjusted is expected to repeatably clamp parallel within "useful" accuracy. If I go with the Grizzly, I'll wait until I can afford the fence upgrade.
Thanks Dan and everyone!
Tom
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Tom Murphy wrote:

It depends on your skill level. My first TS was a cheapo Delta bench saw. It was great for me for a long time. Eventually my inaccuracies were less than its and I needed a better saw. The G1022 with the low-end fence was great for me for a long time. My skills kept improving, and eventually I wanted a fence with better than 1/32" to 1/128" "flutter" on the back side. So I bought a used "Shop Fox Original" fence.
The low-end G1022 fence is very good. If you use its micro adjust and always "sneak up" on the measurement from the same direction you'll be able to set it pretty durn accurately. In retrospect, I got the Shop Fox Original mostly because I was infatuated with it, not because the limits of the Grizzly were hard to work around... <g>
-- Mark
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You make an EXCELLENT point. My skill level is non-existent, and as I alluded to in my earlier post, I don't need super precision for the work I forsee. What I DESIRE is for the fence to "automatically" clamp parallel enough that the stock doesn't pinch between the blade and the fence, and such that the cut edge of the work is relatively parallel to the edge rode along the fence.
I like your comment about being "infatuated" with the Shop Fox fence. That's an excellent assessment and you are obviously a man who knows himself well. I can DEFINITELY relate! I have several tools that are much less useful than that, but I own them because they're COOL!
Thanks, Tom
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I have the shop fox classic and it is a great fence (biesmeyer clone). I think you can probably get that one as an option.
Montyhp

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Tom, Even the Grizzly is a great improvement over a circular saw. I say "even a Grizzly" because I own one I'm looking to upgrade. Mark got it right about the fence. If you always make last move in the same direction, the results will be predictable, and accurate enough.
If you want a basic saw to test the water before you spend a lot of money, the Grizzly will do. If you expect this to be the last table saw you ever buy, keep looking. My main complaint with my Grizzley is not the fence, its the trunnion. The sector the blade tilts on has so much slop in it that the blade cannot be adjusted so that it stays parallel to the slots. I can get it parallel, but after tilting and returning, it has moved due to slack and it's not parallel anymore. This is not something that can be adjusted out; I've got to live with it or trade up.
Now if you still want a Grizzly, I'll sell you mine cheap enough that you can buy a great fence with your savings. Seriously, for $150 plus shipping you (or anyone else) can have a good used saw with only the problems I've mentioned.
Good Luck DonkeyHody
tom snipped-for-privacy@comcast.net (Tom Murphy) wrote in message

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