Table saw blades

Just bought a new BT3100 and am starting to research blades for different uses. As I understand it, an 80 tooth is recommended for finish work, or is that for plywood? I've seen Oldham 60 tooth carbide blades that say they are for finish cuts. Will a 60 tooth do for general purpose finish cuts?
Perhaps the better question is, how many teeth for what sort of work?
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On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 15:23:12 -0700, Grandpa <jsdebooATcomcast.net> wrote:

More teeth for laminates and ply. Fewer teeth for ripping. I have a 40-tooth combination blade installed, a compromise between crosscut, rip, and laminate. But I change blades when I need a quality cut for laminates.
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Typically:
24-30t = rip blades 40-50t = combination blades (rip and crosscut) 60-80t = crosscut blades 80+ = specialty blades for non-ferrous metals, plastics, man-made materials, ceramics, etc.
As always, there are exceptions.
Bob S.
"Grandpa" <jsdebooATcomcast.net> wrote in message

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On Fri, 19 Dec 2003 15:23:12 -0700, Grandpa <jsdebooATcomcast.net> wrote:

I think you need a minimum of two blades to really cover everything. Most people manage with one.
A 40 tooth "combination" is really a crosscut. It does a decent job of ripping (but not quickly) and it cuts sheetgoods adequately. Edge quality on plywood depends on the blade quality and the saw's accuracy, but it's usually OK for workshop use, if not for cabinetry.
For laminates, you needs something finer - 60 or 80, and this will give you a better edge finish on plywood. Won't rip though - your saw will bog down.
So if you're a general woodworker, you can cheerfully do everything on a decent 40. If you make plywood carcases with the odd bit of solid trim, then a 60 will do you. If you range over the whole range, then you're going to need two blades though - maybe a 40 and an 80 to put on when working "finish quality" sheetgoods, or a 60 for most things and a 28 to rip down rough stock.
-- Smert' spamionam
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