table saw blade question

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I just bought a 10" table saw and was wondering if safe to use a 7 1/4" blade on it.
Thanks
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speed of your table saw. Most likely the table saw is slower than the maximum for the 7 1/4" blade.
The quality of the cut is not going to be as good as you'd get from a decent 10" table saw blade because (a) the teeth aren't moving as fast on a small blade as they would be on a large blade spinning at the same speed, and (b) table saw blades are generally better made than blades for portable circular saws (better balanced, finer-grained carbide on the teeth, better sharpened).
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Save the baby humans - stop partial-birth abortion NOW
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Huh? If the blade is secure on the arbor, all distances from the center spin at the arbor speed.
dj

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No, the larger blade will develop a greater rim speed. Otherwise, pulley size would not make any difference in speed on machines. harrym

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wrote:

Its the material passing OVER the pulley that makes the difference, Harry. This is not the same thing as RPM.
The larger the circumference of the pulley, the longer it will take something (belt) to transverse its entire perimeter.
But, if you take a 2" pulley and a 8" pulley...and put them both on the same shaft turning 3,000 RPM, they will both turn at 3,000 RPM.
And ALL parts of both pulleys will turn at 3,000 RPM...both the inner edge and the outer edge.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
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In rec.woodworking

Are you trying to be pedantic or are you just stupid? This is a serious question.
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Bruce responds:

Sure it is. It's right up there with the philosophical question about how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. Charlie Self
"On account of being a democracy and run by the people, we are the only nation in the world that has to keep a government four years, no matter what it does." Will Rogers
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In rec.woodworking snipped-for-privacy@aol.combleah (Charlie Self) wrote:

No, I'm trying to determine whether he understands that the farther from center the blade circumerence is, the faster the teeth move. Obviously, since the blade is a solid object, the rotational speed is the same.
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On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 07:32:00 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:

The SPEED of any blade attached to a motor is measured the same as the MOTOR...in RPM's.
And the inner part of the blade turns at the same rate as the outer part of the blade.
If you wish to coin some definition of outer-edge speed, please do so. But the RPM's...on the same plane anywhere on the blade...are at the same speed...the same RPM's.
Larger blades are thicker for a reason. They produce more centrifugal force at the other edge...and need to be thicker to handle air currents against the larger total surface, etc.

Did you mean 'stupid'?...or 'ignorant'? This is a serious question. Some people are too stupid to know the difference.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
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blade is greater than the linear speed of a 7" blade spinning at the same RPM?
Which one is bigger around?

ROTFLMAO! Do you *really* think that air resistance has anything to do with 10" blades being thicker than 7" blades?
Larger-diameter blades are thicker for stiffness and stability, so that they will resist deflection *under load*.

alt.home.repair that grass doesn't have leaves.[1] I'll leave it to others to judge which is true in your case.
[1] Google alt.home.repair on "trent grass leaves" if you're curious. Trent's posts aren't archived, but my responses (which quote his) are. The thread appeared in early May.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Save the baby humans - stop partial-birth abortion NOW
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On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 16:26:51 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@milmac.com (Doug Miller) wrote:

There ya go! Finally! Linear speed. See...I knew ya could do it! lol

Yup! You don't think there's air present before you put your piece thru?...and that it causes friction on the blade? I was just giving an example. The air deflection isn't gonna be noticed when you cut...but aerodynamics sure plays a part in the design.

Agreed...and for other reasons also.

You exhibit the signs of a real troll...that can't seem to get his idea across...so brings up old shit...even in a different GROUP. Nice one, troll.
I don't usually try to remember the individual poster, Dougie...but I'll try to remember you in the future.
Last post by me on this subject. I've gotta go outside and trim the dead leaves off my grass! lol
Have a nice week...
Trent
Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
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Feeble attempt to turn things around and not look so much like an idiot.

Wrong. Your back to being an idiot.
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wrote:

Actually, I *DO* understand! lol
My point...and this is my final post to ANYBODY on this subject !! LOL...is that most tools are rated by the speed of their motor...in RPM's.
And the speed NEAR the center of a saw blade...I'm not gettin' my feet into THAT debate LOL!) ...is the same as on the outer edge of the blade. The blade does not turn any faster on the outer edge than it does near the center.
However, the distance traveled and/or speed at any particular circumference will vary...and is measured and described in various different terms...miles per hour, feet per minute, etc.
That's what I understand...and I think I'm correct in what I understand.
Anyway...thanks for the relatively CALM reply! lol
Have a nice week...
Trent
Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
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On 27 Jul 2003 06:34:19 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.combleah (Charlie Self) wrote:

Or...
If God can do anything, can he create a stone so large that he can't lift it?! lol
Have a nice week...
Trent
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stone that can't be lifted. (Ever heard of a lever?)
Now I'm *sure* you were an English major.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Save the baby humans - stop partial-birth abortion NOW
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understand the answer to that question.
And BTY, GOD can do anything, not if.
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On Sun, 27 Jul 2003 05:24:05 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@nospam.com (Bruce) wrote:

Are you saying the RPM's would be different? lol
Have a nice week...
Trent
Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
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Ok, I concede after thinking about it a little. The fact is that the teeth move at the same RPM as the arbor regardless of diameter which resulted in my post, but the larger the blade, the faster the teeth have to move to accomplish it. Got it.
Here is another that makes you think(at least it did for me). Your squirrel hunting in the woods and one sees you before you see it. It takes refuge behind a large tree so you can't see it. As you move around the tree facing it, the squirrel moves accordingly to stay completely opposite and hidden from you. You eventually circle the tree but of course never see it. Did you go around the squirrel? I say that you do, but the question has become a source of debate among many.
Don

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If the squirrel continues to face you at all times, You do not go around the squirrel. You go around the location that the squirrel is at. Until you are Have gone around all sides of the squirrel, you have not gone around the squirrel. Had you truly gone around the squirrel and there was no tree to block your view, you would have been able to see his back side. To go around an object, you have to be expose yourself to all its sides.

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I'm afraid on this one, we disagree. Let's assume that Pluto and Earth rotate around the Sun at the same speed. I know, based on the original question, that makes Pluto moving like hell, anyway - lets further assume that the starting point puts Earth and Pluto on opposite sides of the Sun. I belive the Pluto goes around Earth as well as the Sun even though it never sees us, with your line of thought, it does not - correct?
Another example going back to the saw blade. Put a dot with a marker very close to the arbor but still on the blade. The other dot goes on the other side of the arbor but clear out toward the teeth. Your viewpoint is that the outside dot does not go around the inside dot. I think that it does.
Re-reading this, you'd think I'd have something more constructive to do today, but my shop material hasn't been delivered and it's just too hot out today in Iowa.
Don

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