Table saw blade help

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Who makes the best 10 inch table saw blade. I would like a blade that will do rip cuts smooth enough for a glue joint. I will be building a corner cabinet out of black walnut so I figured I had better start with a good blade. Have to keep the wife happy.
Thanks for any help
Virgle
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My CMT combo blade produces clean cuts, but I usually take it to the jointer for a light pass anyway before edge jointing (No flames please).
After you find that 'perfect' blade, you might want to make sure you have it aligned properly. Check out my review of the TS-aligner Jr -Well worth the investment. (NO affiliation just a very satisfied user!)
http://www.garagewoodworks.com/TS_aligner.htm
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Woodworker 11 (two) blade

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Virgle wrote:

...
There is no "best", but there are many excellent and very good...
Forrest, Freud and others rate well. Can't recall whether the last reviews in FWW did rip blades as well as crosscut or not...
As the other responder says, I usually don't worry about trying to make the saw cut the glue edge but plan on cleaning it up on the jointer anyway. Then, a slight slip or hitch in my getalong going through the saw doesn't make any difference anyway.
If I were into mass production, I'd look into it more (but then you'd need/want a power feeder, too)...
imo, $0.20, etc., ...
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Virgle wrote:

Forest Woodworker II, and forget the jointer has worked well for me.
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There are a few good ones. I have the Ridge Carbide and just did a glue up today.
www.ridgecarbidetool.com
www.infinitytools.com
Forrest Woodworker II
Probably a few others too.
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WoodWorker II combo blade with the stabilizer disk. Cuts so clean that you don't have to do any jointing and very little sanding if any. $120.00.
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Virgle wrote:

Forrest woodworker two gets my vote as well....For cheaper blades or for rough cutting planter box type stuff I use Oldham.....Rod
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No such thing as the best blade but there are lots of good ones out there at varying prices. I took the advice of many here and purchased a Forrest WWII. It's good. Not outstanding or stupendous. I followed other advice and got a CMT. It's good but as the WWII not outstanding. In fact, my CMT needs sharpening twice opposed to once for similar use for any other blade. The others are all good. My favorites for the mix of work that I do are the Amana and recently the Tenryu. The Amana gives me the impression of a mack truck barrelling through anything in its way. The Tenryu is more to me like the Euro sports car dashing, darting and getting the job done. So, read the reviews, take advice, including mine, with a grain of salt. Maybe even visit your local DeWalt repair/outlet for an excellent deal on surplus or discontinued blades. I think at this point you'd be better prepared to learn about blades, their teeth and sets before jumping into the 'what's the best blade?' pool.
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My favorites for the mix

Roy, I've been looking at blades for portable circular saws recently, and have come across a few very positive reviews of the Tenryu. When you say it dashes and darts, are you implying it cuts fast but not very straight? Curious to hear more specifics about this blade... Thanks, Andy
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What I mean is that it seems to nimbly cut through whatever is put into it. It's not brute strength it's more of some sort of super sharpness that allows it to do its thing. In the past few days I've used it to cut over 30 pcs of 1/4"x2"x42" strips from some hard cherry and the blade just seemed to smugly go about its business making the cuts without balking. I glued up those pieces in my bent lamination without even thinking of sanding. I don't know how much sense this all makes to you but at this time I'd call the Tenryu my blade of choice. ROY!
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Forrest Woodworker II, use them and you'll find out why major production houses rely on them. I have two so I can rotate when one needs a sharpening back at Forrest.

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I've seen good cuts with Ryobi, Freud, Irwin, Black & Decker, and my 20-yr-old rusty Craftsman carbide with a few chipped teeth. As long as you are careful not to bend a tooth or mount the blade wobbly, or get it dirty (with sap/glue adhesions), all the modern blades are good, IMHO.
Spend an extra hour with calipers/dial gages trueing the blade and the fence, if you really need the cut quality to remain high. Or an extra quarter hour with a good alignment jig. Google "ts-aligner" for instance.
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Lots of vendors make good carbide blades.
These days it takes about $200 to get a set containinng 24T, 50T & 80T blades.
Less than that and you are looking at the bottom feeders.
I have a Freud set, they work for me.
YMMV
Lew
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Mon, Aug 13, 2007, 12:19am (EDT+4) snipped-for-privacy@att.net (Virgle) doth queryeth: Who makes the best 10 inch table saw blade. I would like a blade <snip>
Hehehe I bought a 10" blade awhile back that gives a very nice smooth cut. Carbide tipped, of course. Don't recall the brand at this second. Bought it at Big Lots, priced at $9.95. True story.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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Sure, I've done that too, but the important thing is *how long* will a cheapie blade give you a nice cut? You've skirted the important question J T.
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Tue, Aug 14, 2007, 5:20am snipped-for-privacy@teksavvy.com (Upscale) doth sayeth: Sure, I've done that too, but the important thing is *how long* will a cheapie blade give you a nice cut? You've skirted the important question J T.
Ah, but as I seldom use it, should last a long time. However, I do have a $6 carbide tipped blade in my circular saw, I use fairly frequently, thst's been holding up well, so far. Of course, if I was using either on an every day basis, I'd spend $2-3 more, and get some 'spensive blades. If I was doing this for a living, I'd probably go at least $5 more. LOL
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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Upscale wrote:

My no name, bought at a Borg, 10" carbide blade is still cutting well after ten years. Of course I'm just a home hobbyshopper and I use my saw maybe once a week, whereas a pro uses his once an hour. Us home hobbyshoppers don't always have to pay for professional grade stuff, we seldom use it hard enough to wear it out.
David Starr
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Fri, Aug 17, 2007, 12:38pm snipped-for-privacy@roadrunner.com (DavidStarr) doth sayeth: <snip> Us home hobbyshoppers don't always have to pay for professional grade stuff, we seldom use it hard enough to wear it out.
Yep, that's about my feelings too.
However. There's always a however. However, I only buy cheap small hand tools, pliers, wrenches, etc.. Because, being as I have two sons, I often only get one time usage out of them, then the tool(s) mysteriously vanish, and neither son knows anyting. So I only buy cheap hand tools. Example, they replaced my well pump for me, and needed a flashlight. I provided them a $1 flashlight (came with 2 batteries even). Yesterday found it in the drive, where it'd been run over by the younger son's truck. Sigh. The joys of parenthood.
JOAT I do things I don't know how to do, so that I might learn how to do them. - Picasso
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However. There's always a however. However, I only buy cheap small hand tools, pliers, wrenches, etc.. Because, being as I have two sons, I often only get one time usage out of them, then the tool(s) mysteriously vanish, and neither son knows anyting. So I only buy cheap hand tools. Example, they replaced my well pump for me, and needed a flashlight. I provided them a $1 flashlight (came with 2 batteries even). Yesterday found it in the drive, where it'd been run over by the younger son's truck. Sigh. The joys of parenthood.
Reminds me of a meeting of the liars club. Each member got up and told an elaborate story, some taking 20 minutes to weave their tale. The last man up simply said "I have two grown children and a flashlight and they all work" No one could top that.
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