Table Saw

I am looking at a new table saw and I see that most of them will run 110/220v. They also say that they are pre wired to one of these voltages. How hard is it to change the wiring to make it go from 220v to 110v?
Thanks
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There is usually a plate with a couple of screws -- lift the plate and undo a couple more screws so you can shift the right wires... A lot of motors I have seen have a wiring diagram attached to the motor, or the inside of the plate.
Undo a couple of screws - swap some wires...
Changing motor direction on a 110V motor is usually the same idea. Very simple - till you get distracted and put the wire under the wrong screw. :-))
Highspeed wrote:

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Changing the motor over is pretty easy, but the magnetic starter/relay (if you use one) would have to be changed too. For instance with 220V, there are 2 lines, both of which are switched by the starter relay, and broken by the emergency stop button. With 110V, there is only one line and a neutral. Also, my starter has overcurrent protection of some sort IIRC. Going to 110V from 220V will double the current.
If you can possibly get 220V, I would go that way as your saw will stall less when the voltage is low, and trip the breaker less often. (Voltage often drops in the summer when everyone's home air conditioners are running at the same time)
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Will wrote:

So, how long does it take for the arbor nut to spin itself off? just in case:-) Joe
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Usually the plug end melts -- so I have been told -- not that I have _ever_ done it myself understand... Just what I hear. Only idiots make that mistake.
DAMHIKT - Is the acronym I saw the other day. LOL
Joe Gorman wrote:

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Would it not be easier to wire your outlet for 220v than to risk destroying a table saw motor that requires 220v??

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stoutman wrote:

He's talking about a dual-voltage motor...geez!
To OP, it's not difficult at all (assuming, of course, it's not a Chinese motor like one I had w/ a totally indecipherable chart). There will be a wiring diagram w/ it that shows the connections for either voltage.
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I knew that, I was just...umm...kidding. :| Yeah, I was only kidding. (feeling stupid)

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Normally, they come from the factory wired for 110v and you change the wiring to make it 220v. Its not a difficult change at all. The wiring changes are made inside the junction box mounted on the side of the motor. You also have to change the plug on the end of the cable.
I changed several of my tools. It took about an hour for each change (I work slow).
Bob
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Highspeed wrote:

You need a scanning tunneling electron microscope, a beaker, a tub of vegetable oil, and three nekkit wimminz to complete the job. You apply the vegetable oil to the nekkit wimminz, then you have them fiddle with how the wires are hooked up inside the motor, according to the little chart. Pour the beaker full of beer to drink while you watch them work, and then use the microscope to inspect your Scary Sharp(tm) edges while you wait for them to finish. Shouldn't take more than a few minutes.
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On Tue, 08 Feb 2005 22:42:59 -0500, Silvan
......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

What beer? You did not mention any beer until now? What do I do? I am stuck here!
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Ummm... do you need help in your shop???
Silvan wrote:

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I rewrired my Craftsman 22124 for 240v in about 10 minutes. It's trivial. Basically what it amounts to is changing over coils wired in parallel to serial wiring...
-Mike
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On Tue, 8 Feb 2005 21:21:46 -0500, "Highspeed"

220V to 110V? Why? If it's wired for 240V to begin with that suggests (not guarantees) a 3 HP motor, which will draw in excess of 20A at 120V. Do you have a 120V circuit with 10 gauge wire and a 30A breaker? If you don't, leave the motor on 240V and wire a 240V line from the load center to near the saw.
Anyway, if you must, it's a two part process.
Part 1: as many have already pointed out, rewiring the motor is quite simple--perhaps a five minute process. The diagram should be inside the junction box on the motor. If it isn't you may want to rethink this. You can probably figure it out using an ohmmeter, but if you knew how to do that you wouldn't be asking this question in the first place.
Part 1A: in preparation for using the saw after completing Part 2 below, mount a plug suitable for the desired voltage on the cord that goes to your motor. DO NOT leave the original plug on it.
Part 2: you need to run an appropriate voltage line with an appropriate current capacity (amps) from your load center (breaker box) to somewhere near your saw and provide an appropriate outlet there.
Plugs and receptacles are configured differently for 120V and 240V. Don't mix them up.
They are also configured differently for various amperages but they are less fussy. In fact, there are dual configuration receptacles intended for 20A circuits available in both 120V and 240V configurations. They are arranged so that one can plug a 15A device into a the 20A receptacle. However, one can't plug a 20A device into a 15A only receptacle.
It is uncommon to find a true 20A plug on a 240V device (some window or wall unit air conditioners, perhaps). It is even more uncommon to find a true 20A plug on a 120V device--I can't remember ever seeing one.
- - LRod
Master Woodbutcher and seasoned termite
Shamelessly whoring my website since 1999
http://www.woodbutcher.net
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On Tue, 8 Feb 2005 21:21:46 -0500, "Highspeed"

========Depends .... If you have trouble getting down on your hands and knees to reach the motor then IT could be a problem... or if you only had the wrong kind of screwdriver you could have problems...
Normally just pull a cover and move one wire... ..c
Bob Griffiths
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On Tue, 8 Feb 2005 21:21:46 -0500, "Highspeed"

Very easy. They will have an electrical diagram showing the proper connectors. You also need to change the plug.
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