Table or Mitre Saw?

Page 1 of 2  
Hi,
I want to get a new power saw and I thought either a mitre or table saw.
Below is
a) a mitre saw - 30 http://www.argos.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId 001&langId=-1&catalogId%01&productId0592&clickfrom=name
b) a table saw - 40 http://www.argos.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId 001&langId=-1&catalogId%01&productId0571&clickfrom=name
Cheers,
Sam
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

of the two the miter saw looks more like a real machine, to me.
they're both sort of toys, though. expect inadequate power and short service life.
take some time, save your money and look for good older equipment. the older and heavier the better.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Obviously it depends on what you want to use them for! For woodworking a table saw is much much much more important than a table saw; while for carpentry a miter saw might be better. However, a crappy table saw (and your link looks like a crappy table saw) is a curse forever. A crappy miter saw (and I own a crappy miter saw, so I know) is simply unpleasant.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
This one any better?
SB

http://www.argos.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId 001&langId=-1&catalogId%01&productId0592&clickfrom=name
http://www.argos.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId 001&langId=-1&catalogId%01&productId0571&clickfrom=name
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I'm in the colonies and I don't know what you're going to be using them for, so use a fairly large grain of salt.
Of the bunch, the miter saw looks to be the better tool. Of course, being 8-inch, it would cut a max of 8 inches wide at 90 degrees, and less than that as you started to cut angles. So for me it would be too limiting.
I sincerely think you'd be better off with a good circular saw than you would be with that benchtop table saw.
But if your purpose is creating small stuff, like boxes or models, then perhaps both of them would serv you just fine. The circular saw wouldn't be very good for cutting smaller, thinner stock, but that little tablesaw would do it just fine. The tablesaw looks like it's intended for modelers, the miter saw looks like it's intended for stock of almost any length but only about an inch thick and six or seven inches wide.
But then, it looks like you've only got 40 or 50 pounds to spend. If you want the most bang for the... if you want the most you can get for what you spend, I lean towards the miter saw.
My two pence. :-)
Dan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

They're both rubbish.
The chop saw is fitted with a 24 tooth blade that's only fit for crude ripping (and you can't rip with a chop). It also has a bizarre 20mm bore, so you'll not find a better blade to fit it.
The table saw is just pitiful. I don't even want to talk about it.

If you don't know which one you need, then you're either hopelessly confused about their function, or you've just got money burning a hole in your pocket. What do you want them _for_ ? What do you want to cut, and will this saw do that type of cut ?
The chop saw is only fit for crude crosscuts, probably just in softwood. This is the very easiest (simplest and less tiring) cut to make by hand. It has no slide or stop, so it can't even cut a halved joint. It can "mitre", which is a feature of near-total uselessness. It's too crude to make picture frame, and what else uses a crude butt joint ? If you're going to make a very poor dog kennel, or maybe some shopfitting, then it might have a function (which it will probably fail to fulfill, but it might try).
A "table saw" isn't such a bad idea. If you get one that works, then it will do useful things for you. But this piece of junk is just taking 40 quid and burning it on rubbish.
200 quid (IMHO) gets you a decent table saw. 100 quid gets you one that has some pretence to usefulness, for the cruder sort of work. 500 quid gets you old industrial iron that will last forever. 40 quid just gets you grief.
You already have a jigsaw and a router. Presumably you also have 40 quid. That's some useful hand tools and some timber. Come back when you've done something more with what you _have_now_. You've got enough to make something with already, you certainly don't _need_ a table saw right this minute.
One of the best things to use a table saw for is ripping stock down to size. This takes a big cheap chunk of wood and turns it into usable sizes. But you can nearly always avoid this by having the timberyard do it for you. It's cheaper to have your own saw, and more convenient - but you can work around not having it. Where you are at the moment, you're not even needing to do much ripping. Buy your timber as ready sawn and surfaced, it's easier and quicker - you can manage with that for the moment.

That's the problem. 40 quid does not buy you a new saw that you would want to use.
Most tools are rubbish. Nearly all modern tools are. Argos sell junk, to stupid people. Look at their jewellery - for this is where their inherent and inescapable chaviness is most obvious. Now ask yourself why the store that could offer us this: http://www.argos.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId 001&langId=-1&catalogId%01&productId7847&clickfrom=name Is somehow any further up-market when it comes to woodworking ?
As an alternative, do you know anyone who already has a suitable saw and will either let you use it, or will cut stock down for you ?
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Pssst) Andy,
SB is 13 years old, just starting out. He is also a Brit.
cheers,
Greg
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Then he's getting good advice at the start, isn't he?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ah -- the joys of being 13 -- and what's wrong with being a Brit :-)
A proud Brit, Malcolm Webb
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
What's *wrong* with being a Brit? Well, being an Aussie, where do start? :-)
I mean't that by being a Brit, he will be stubborn enough to whittle a chair with a blunt penknife!
--

Greg


"Malcolm Webb" < snipped-for-privacy@cix.co.uk> wrote in message
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 21:28:04 +1100, "Greg Millen"
......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email

Great! Let go of the bloody cheap shit power tools, and get better hand tools.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks Andy,
I will save for a better one, but for little things like my glasses box, getting those diagonals right really is a pain..
Thanks for the Argos picture lol
Sam

01&langId=-1&catalogId%01&productId0592&clickfrom=name
01&langId=-1&catalogId%01&productId0571&clickfrom=name
http://www.argos.co.uk/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId 001&langId=-1&catalogId%01&productId7847&clickfrom=name
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Sam Berlyn states:

For miters in small work, there must be a company in Blighty that makes and sells something like these Jorgenson maple miter boxes. Use these with a good handsaw and you'll be doing miters the way carpenters and woodworkers have done them for a couple centuries or more. And it works. And is low in cost.
http://www.adjustableclamp.com/mb-62000.htm
Charlie Self "Health nuts are going to feel stupid someday, lying in hospitals dying of nothing." Redd Foxx
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 21 Nov 2004 09:58:33 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.comnotforme (Charlie Self) wrote:

Emir, in beech. Well worth having. There are cheap plastic ones too, which aren't so good (the slots wear)
Having looked at Sam's plan though, it would still be hard to cut with a mitre box. It's a mitred rip, so that's too long a mitre to cut in a typical mitre box. When I've needed similar things (or board mitres on the ends of skirting boards) I've made my own "tall and narrow" miitre boxes to suit the job. If you have some good timber (beech is good, elm or oak are good too) and you take your time on the cut, then you can make an accurate box. A deep box probably needs to be used with a bow saw, unless you have a very deep tenon saw to hand.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 13:12:24 +0000, Andy Dingley

I suspect his best-bang-for-the-buck solution will be a block plane and a shooting board.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 09:26:05 -0000, "Sam Berlyn"

Ideally you'd cut those mitres with a table saw, either by tilting the blade or by using a sled (it carries the timber at an angle, past a vertical blade).
It would be dangerous to cut them on that "mitre" saw. It's designed to cut mitres the other way.
On the whole though, I wouldn't make your glasses box with mitres. Mitres are a pain - I hate the things. My last mitres were a compound-mitred casket which I cut on the table saw and I splined those (inserted a "feather" of thin timber into a groove) to hold them in place while I assembled them. An unsplined mitre is always a nuisance to assemble because there's nothing positive to hold it accurately in place.
You have a router, so why not try a rebated lap ? Routers are good at rebates. This is just like a butt joint, but you cut a rebate (removing one corner by a square groove) so that the rebate is the width of the board and half the depth. It's easy to glue up because just wrapping the box with elastic bands pulls it tight against the rebate as a "stop".
Rebated laps are a bit ugly, because they expose some end grain (if you make a box that's bigger and shallower). But for your box, you're working with two long grain edges, so that's OK. You can also make the joint, then cut a little chamfer on the outside edge to hide this.
Some very good books (you'll find at least one in the library) are the introductory joinery books by Tage Frid, Ernest Joyce, Robert Wearing and maybe Charles Hayward.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Agreed on the use of the table saw as the preferred method Andy, but I disagree on the danger and the intended use of the miter saw. It's designed to cut down through wood at any angle. It does not care nor does it know which direction the wood is oriented in. The saw is equally well suited to cross cut miters through the width of a board as it is across the width of one. There's no increase in danger in this operation. It's a common use of a miter saw and a very reasonable use as well.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 15:01:46 GMT, "Mike Marlow"

The problem is that for Sam's box, you're going to have a long mitre on a short piece (actually narrow, along the board). This piece is even shorter than the length of the cut. As it's a compound mitre saw you could do this, but you've an awkward problem in holding it down.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Correct. Ignore that brain fart Andy. Thank you.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@sprintmail.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 21 Nov 2004 13:26:37 +0000, Andy Dingley
Thanks to an email from Sam I now realise this isn't what he's making at all. Sorry about that - I thought you were mitring the side joints. The top edges of the box sides _are_ cut at an angle though.
OK, so the saw is still a bad idea 8-) I'm all for buying specialist tools, but with 30 quid of chop saw just to make two cuts, you could _hire_ someone to come and saw it for you!
Yes, for the cut you are making, the chop saw would do it, But so would a hand saw, particularly when you're making 45 cuts and you can use a mitre box.
For your joints, butts have a similar problem to mitres - there's no positive location, so they're a nuisance to clamp up. Investigate cutting the rebated lap with your router.
This is also quite a small box you're making. Small stuff is tricky because errors show up as larger. Things about a foot or two on each side are often easier.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.