table design question

Does anyone know of some generally accepted or adhered to design ratios for the diameter of a circular pedestal table top to the diameter of the circle formed by the four legs? Worded another way, I'm trying to figure out how far each leg should extend along a radial line so the table is not 'tippy' without making them protrude so much that they get in the way of the sitters.
tia,
jc
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Joe" wrote

Another consideration is weight. The heavier that base is, the smaller the pedestal has to be. I have seen some circular table bases with weights in them. One I saw had recycled window sash weights included in the column.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Joe wrote:

I can't answer your question directly but I used to have a table with a 60" glass top 1/2" thick on a pedestal that was no more than 24". Maybe less. Tippy only if someone tried to sit on it. People tend to not do that with glass :)
I made a 48" oak table a few years ago and put the legs 24" apart. If I were to do it over I'd put them closer because a 48" round table can seat 6 people...If I try that the legs are too far out for those that aren't between two legs. I figure legs with 18" between them would be about right for that diameter.
--

dadiOH
____________________________
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

For any table or chair to have stability, the leg ends should extend beyond the edge of the table. Small tables especially need good stability so sometimes legs are splayed or curved outward. A round pedestal top may have three or 4 legs. In this case, the 4-legged version would be less tippy than a 3-legged version. You might want to visit a furniture store and take a look. Ask the salesman if you can take some measurements. The center of gravity makes a difference too--stability increases with a lower center of gravity (fill a hollow pedestal with lead). Of course, all bets are off if someone tries to sit (or set an anvil) on the edge. Not practical in all cases, but fastening all the legs permanently to the floor will keep it in place.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I built a copy of an antique table that my parents have. The table is a 54" diameter round top with four legs attached to an octagon pedestal. Measuring across the legs they are 42" .
Mike O.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.