table

I would like to build an oak dinning table, and I was thinking of using 3/4 oak t and g flooring. Anybody tried this before? Good idea or not? Thanks Eric
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If you don't mind dining on a floor, you could probably get away with it.
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On Sun, 04 Jan 2004 15:31:35 -0600, Swingman wrote:

My mother's floors are so clean one could eat off them; mine are not.
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C wrote:

My floors *must* be clean, because the dogs don't mind eating off of them.
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Swingman wrote:

ROTFLMAO
Rich
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When the kids were really small, you could indeed eat off the kitchen floor at times, there was enough ...
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Best regards
Han
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SWMBO won't allow me to eat over the sink, nor off the floor anymore. :-(
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Eric,
Typically, the T&G on flooring is not a tight joint. Therefore, just gluing it up would not give a structural panel. Gluing it up on plywood would invite warping. The ways I would approach it would be to -
1. rip off the tongue and groove and edge glue the boards. Con - you would have a lot of narrow boards.
2. (the one I would use if I had to use flooring for a table). Glue the flooring to 1/4" ply, then put 1" solid oak around the sides with breadboard ends. Screw angle iron from underneath to the top. This will keep it from warping. The spacing of the angle iron depends on the dimensions of the top and the specs on the angle iron. Personally, I would use a WAG unless I decided to get my design manuals out (which I haven't looked at in many years). Incorporate the angles into the design so as to hide it. I would use 1/4" ply for two reasons. One, the thinner ply tends toward lesser warp. Two, the top would only be 1" which is more reasonable for a tabletop thickness.
BTW, properly executed, it could be a top as nice as any other. However, I would only consider it if the material was free and I didn't have the resources for a different alternative.
Preston

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"Preston Andreas" wrote in message
<snip>

I know you like to overbuild ... it took an act of congress and a couple of crowbars to break into your reinforced carton containing the UniGuard last year ... but angle iron? ... on a dining room table?
On second thought, it does go well with the hardwood flooring thing. :>)
Just kidding ... thanks again for the good deal on the guard, and have a prosperous New Year, with no more tools lost to thieves.
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