T-Force Air for nailers?

Page 1 of 2  

There are days when I do a lot of little things in a lot of different places and dragging a compressor (even a pancake) becomes an inconvenience.
Doing my duty-ful DAGS-thang, I stumbled upon these fellas: http://www.turanairsystems.com/default.html
So, before I get an overdose of sticker-shock, I would like to ask my BIT's (Brethern-In-Tools) here if any of you have had the pleasure to use this air delivery system. It sure makes a heckuvalot of sense to me.
The usual caveats apply: I have NO affiliation with this company. I have NOT been drinking.
Respectfully, I remain,
r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
The 3000psi fill center is interesting (scuba?) (I didn't see the price). I think the high pressure carbon fiber wrapped tanks can be used for only a few years (6 ?). I know that scuba tanks over 1800psi have to be inspected every year ( having your own mini compressor it might not be an issue ) . To reach 3000psi with that little pump may take awhile. The system looks expensive, what are they asking with refill pump?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've never used one of these but have used steel Nitrogen tanks available from any local welding supply. Of course the appropriate regulator must be used. I've also seen others using CO2 tanks. A 30 cubic inch cylinder would last for quite a while (never used it continuously).
Now having said that, I also worked in an industry which uses high pressure gas to inflate escape slides for aircraft.....there's a lot of kinetic energy in one of those tanks and I've seen the havoc that occurs when a cylinder is compromised. Makes a table saw accident look pretty benign.
My concern would be the pump life if you opted for that system. The portable pumps we used were always breaking down.
Gary
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
A 3000psi pump requires more maint. than a 150 psi pump. It also has less volume. The compressors used in dive centers cost thousands of dollars. Air purity isn't needed in this application (like scuba) so compressor and maint. should be less. A 3000psi tank that fails can destroy a room or become a projectile. The contractors I know on the construction sites are using Paslode airless nail guns.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
<snip>

You know Gary I've always wondered just how bad it is when one of those tanks goes off...Are you talking about sudden catastrophic failure (explosion), or having a tank failure/extreme leak of some sort (ballistic)
I've always wanted to see just how far one would fly if you knock the valve off of one.
Just curious.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
bremen68 wrote:

A construction manager friend told me he saw one go through a block wall like it wasn't there.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I saw a picture of a dive shop in the caribbean that had a tank failure. I looked like a bomb went off. Walls knocked down and one person dead (Tank fill person)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Mythbusters (an amusing television show) shot the valve off a SCUBA tank and got the result on camera. What you get is a rocket, but one that flies around like a balloon when you let it go -- pretty scary. They also shot holes in the sides of the tank -- much less impressive results.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Murray Peterson wrote:

There are valid reasons why trucks carrying compressed gas cylinders are set up they way they are, as well as all those OSHA rules for cylinder use and storage.
I'm glad I got to see it from the safety of my tee-vee. <G>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"B A R R Y" wrote

Most welding shop have some pictures of destruction caused by stupid people and compressed gasses. Also some tall tales of various idiots who ignore basic safety rules and cause great harm to themselves and/or their surroundings.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

IIRC, it was an oxygen cylinder in a vendors stand that fell over(without the safety cover over the valve), broke off the valve & wreaked havoc, including fire, explosion and several deaths at the Indianapolis fairground coliseum back in the '60s.
--
Nahmie
The only road to success is always under construction.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Others posted what happens, a balloon whipping around but on a really destructive scale. I've also seen the hoses attached to these cylinders bust a fitting and tear appart a room as it was whipping around. Of course after this happened the company put in one hell of a safety cage in the test lab! One of our engineers took a big hit on his back as he was diving away...damn lucky it didn't hit him in the head.
Each time a new size cylinder is qualified (for the aircraft industry at least) it has to go through a gun shot test (and fire tests). The cylinder must remain intact (no castastrophic failure of the cylinder other than the bullet hole) but no requirement for where the cylinder ends up after getting shot......in one such case the "marksman" actually hit the valve instead of the tank. Never did find the valve. Most of the cylinders used are a kevlar reinforced aluminum cylinder. Recently they switched to carbon fiber reinforced aluminum cylinders to reduce weight. Only the general aviation rafts still use the old metal cylinders.
It's pretty amazing to see the upper deck slide on a 747 inflate in six seconds......it uses two 1100 cubic inch cylinders using a Nitrogen/CO2 mixture at 3000 psi to run four turbofan aspirators. way cool.
Gary
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

If you ever worked in a shipyard or knew someone who did, here is a story you can appreciate. Beth Steel ran a shipyard in Baltimore that was pretty active up through the 60s or 70s. The phrase "shipyard mechanic", at least in Baltimore, had a particular connotation in the mostly long vanished industrial economy that once supported so many people in this area. Anyway, after completing a ship or boat, and lauching it, shipyard personnel would sometimes take it out in the harbor for a short shakedown. Sometimes there was some horseplay. For instance, a gas cylinder was rolled over to the edge of the ship deck, and the valve knocked off with a sledge. The cylinder would "fly" off the ship or boat, hit the water, and rapidly sail along like a torpedo. With no fins or other controls, the course of the "torpedo" would be unpredictable. On one occasion, it turned full around, came back to the ship, and put a hole in it! The "crew" was able to get back to the shipyard before the brand new ship sank in the Chesapeake Bay.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Its a paintball tank. A local finish carpenter tried it, hated it. He would only get halve a rack of nails before he was out. If the hose connection proved too difficult, he lost most of the air. He finally took my advise and switched to the new 1/4" poly hoses. Now he leaves the compressor outside or in the truck.
Dave
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

$ 545.00 for the small tank and regulator/holster. Around $ 2600.00 for the compressor.
I sure like the concept, but at those prices, I can buy one big reel of 1/4" poly.... and suddenly my pancake doesn't seem that heavy anymore.
I mean.. whoa... 4-kilobucks by the time I get it up to Canuckistan?
The safety issue, even though I respect it, is not really problematic to me. After all, it is paintball technology.
Thanks Dave.
r
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Robatoy wrote:

Aren't the paintball tanks a _lot_ smaller? Don't underestimate safety concerns.
The carbon fiber wrapped tank is a tip off. It's the same wow factor coefficient as the masters fatty cyclist who buys a $8000 carbon fiber bike and is carrying 50 extra pounds in his beer gut.
R
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
RicodJour wrote:

No, the hardcore paintballers use big carbon fiber tanks to refill the little tanks on the gun out in the field.

The carbon fiber wrap theoretically could reduce the weight, given that you can then thin out the metal tank walls and rely on the carbon fiber to take the pressure.
Carbon fiber tanks can also be rated up to 4500psi, while regular scuba tanks are 3000psi.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Chris Friesen wrote:

And carbon fiber bikes can now be had for well under $2000. <G>
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Take a look at allinonewood.com in Mississauga Ont Canada, page two of their current flyer has a CO2 system for 100 + Cdn $ shoots up to 500 nails per charge. Looks nice and compact . I'd expect a recharge to be in the 8-10 $ range but this is a guess so YMMV and no I am not drinking or affiliated with Allinonewood, although I did once buy a Jet mini lathe from them and I like it a lot.
Ken
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I don't see how this is any different than using a compressed gas cylinder with nitrogen (or carbon dioxide) and a regulator. This is ancient technology -- I've seen it done in the 70's.
Robatoy wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.