System Three Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox

Any thoughts on pros/cons of System3 Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox for the following uses: 1. Filling holes/gouges and other defects in wood 2. Replacing rotten wood in exterior windows and trim
They both seem rather expensive, so I figured that I might as well get input from others who have tried both.
Thanks, Jeff
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blueman wrote: > Any thoughts on pros/cons of System3 Sculpwood vs. Abatron WoodEpox > for the following uses: > 1. Filling holes/gouges and other defects in wood > 2. Replacing rotten wood in exterior windows and trim > > They both seem rather expensive, so I figured that I might as well get > input from others who have tried both.
Don't have a clue about the above, but it can't be much more than epoxy thickened with micro-balloons.
SFWIW, I make my own.
If you dig out rotted wood and patch it back with epoxy, then fair it out when cured, you have basically boat fairing compound hanging onto a hunk of wood that is probably going to continue to rot anyway.
Depending on how large the repair is, it may be more effective to replace the rotted piece completely.
You will need to paint it over on exterior applications to provide UV protection.
Have fun.
Lew
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I have been using System Three and it is a lot better than homemade stuff mixing epoxy with sawdust. The components are non-sticky and are kneaded together. Very easy to work and mold -- also the cured consistency is easy to work, including sanding, drilling, etc.
I haven't used Abatron, but was interested in knowing whether it is better, worse, or just different before I start buying quantity of either one.

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I have used Abatron to repair a rotted windowsill. It was my first time (and only) time using it, but I found it hard to work with. It took a lot of mixing, and was very stiff. When I applied it, I had a very hard time smoothing it out. In fact, I couldn't smooth it out. However, when it cured and I sanded it, it worked very well...my problems with it may well have been my fault, but if I do another similar repair I plan to try System Three or MAS epoxy, just to see it they are easier to use. Eric
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blueman wrote:
> I have been using System Three and it is a lot better than homemade > stuff mixing epoxy with sawdust. The components are non-sticky and are > kneaded together. Very easy to work and mold -- also the cured > consistency is easy to work, including sanding, drilling, etc.
Unless all you are using sawdust for cosmetic purposes such as to match a color, as when filling nail holes, that's one thing.
If you are using sawdust as a filler for structural applications, you are kidding yourself and wasting good epoxy.
Sawdust adds no strength.
OTOH, micro-balloons are very low cost, a 4 cubic ft, 30 lb bag is less than $25.00.
Add as much as is req'd.
Lew
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About 20 years ago, I made some temporary house trim repairs with Minwax High Performance Wood Hardener and High Performance Wood Filler. I thought the repairs would fail because of wood movement being different than wood filler movement with the change of seasons, etc. I just got around to replacing the skirt boards and other pieces that had been patched up it held up just fine.
All punky wood was removed and several coats of the hardener applied prior to applying the filler. The hardener is a thinned epoxy that stabilizes the repair area and helps the bond. Ive latter learned that its a good idea to drill some small holes in the wood forming keys for the filler to hold. The wood filler is a little tricky. You let it set up for a while, sculpt it, let it completely harden, than sand it for finishing.
Ive heard that Bondo works just as good as the wood filler.
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Yes, Bondo works well.

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"MartinR" wrote:
> Ive heard that Bondo works just as good as the wood filler.
Unfortunately, a common error.
Bondo consists of polyester resin and a talc filler.
Polyester is NOT an adhesive.
Ever notice the holes in a auto body panel in the area where a Bondo repair has been made?
the Bondo fills the holes and makes a mechanical bond with the metal.
The same logic was followed years ago in boat building before epoxy became more cost effective.
OTOH, epoxy is an adhesive.
It's basic limitation is that is does not contain any UV inhibitors and must be protected in applications exposed to direct sun light.
Lew
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No error there. Bondo is a good filler, as the poster stated. He never claimed it to be anything else.

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CW wrote: > No error there. Bondo is a good filler, as the poster stated. He never > claimed it to be anything else.
Two (2) things you can say about Bondo.
It is low cost and feathers to a fine edge.
After that, it is all down hill.
It is heavy, has no strength, and offers very limited adhesion since it is not an adhesive.
But if it meets your needs, have fun.
Lew
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What about "Bondo Wood Filler"? The manufacturer claims: Rebuilds & restores rotted wood, windowsills, fascial boards, siding, posts, etc. Replaces missing pieces on antiques, doors, columns, and tables. Once dry filler can be sanded, shaped, planed, drilled, routed or sawed. Accepts stain and paint more naturally than most wood fill products...
Is it the same as Bondo for cars but just rebranded/marketed or is it really as good as System Three or Abatron wood fill epoxy products?
Thanks
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blueman wrote:
> Is it the same as Bondo for cars but just rebranded/marketed or is it > really as good as System Three or Abatron wood fill epoxy products?
If you go to the Bondo web site, they appear to offer both polyester and epoxy products.
If you check out the MSDS for "wood filler", it talks about styrene.
Styrene and polyester go together.
Lew
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