Sweating dust pipe issue


It's been a while since I have posted to this group, but I try to read everyday. I am in the process of finishing my new 24x30 shop and had a question about my DC piping. I built a 4x8 bump out on the back of the shop and will put the DC and air compressor in there to kill the noise. I was planning to run the piping from there , above the ceiling joists and down through the finshed ceiling. I will then blow 12-14" of cellulose insulation in the attic. My concern is that there will only be about 3-4" of insulation under the piping with the remainder around and over it. The question is whether the warm air flowing through the piping will cause it to sweat. I don't think it will but I value this groups opinions. I would hate to do it this way and find out later that it was a mistake.
Thanks in advance as I humbly await your responses.
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denmar27 wrote:

Sweating occurs on a surface when its temperature is below the dew point of the ambient air. It could be a problem if your pipe is cooler than ambient such as if you air conditioned your shop in the summer. It won't be a problem as long as the pipe is warmer than its surroundings.
I'm assuming you made some provision to return the air back to the shop after it's been filtered? Otherwise you'll be throwing all your heated air out with your dust.
DonkeyHody "We should be careful to get out of an experience only the wisdom that is in it - and stop there; lest we be like the cat that sits down on a hot stove-lid. She will never sit down on a hot stove-lid again---and that is well; but also she will never sit down on a cold one anymore." - Mark Twain
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