summary for hf clamps

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sounds like the quick release bar clamps and the aluminum bar clamps are the only ones worth it
the quick release ratcheting clamps with the pistol grip are no good and have no power
but i have a tiny set of the pistol-grip ratcheting clamps and i find uses for them for small stuff
i was hand planing and went off the edge and caused a splinter the splinter did not come free so i put a dab a glue and a small clamp and it was just right
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On Sat, 31 Oct 2015 10:39:32 -0700, Electric Comet

I have a pile of the HF aluminum bar clamps that you can have. They're junk.

Agreed. Fortunately I didn't have much invested in them before I figured it out.

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On 10/31/2015 1:39 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

The quick release "SAME AS BESSEY" C clamps are ok too. I have an older set of alum bar clamps. They are nice and thick compared to Jet and some others. Not sure about the current crop.

--
Jeff

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On 10/31/2015 12:39 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

FWIW even high quality aluminum bar clamps are not very useful. They all bend very easily under light pressure. I have 6 and only use them as a last resort.

You seem to have condemned Jet for using a cheaply made fastening part, you are not going to like HF products.
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On 11/02/2015 8:06 AM, Leon wrote:

Try those from Dubuque Clamp Works...
<http://www.thonline.com/news/business/article_4c1b143a-bff2-5dd4-869c-47c8a63cff52.html There are several resellers; as the above article notes they've deliberately chosen to not go direct...
<https://www.toolsforworkingwood.com/store/dept/CDC/item/MS-ABAR.XX I've some of unknown manufacturer that are t-bar rails like the best old cabinet clamps with a very hard/stiff Al (I presume aircraft) alloy. But afaict there's nobody currently manufacturing such any longer. These were obtained from the shop of the old codger in Lynchburg of whom I've spoken previously when he was beginning to slow down and starting to limit the size and quantity of work he was doing. They're all 48"...
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On 11/2/2015 8:44 AM, dpb wrote:

that that 25+ years ago.
If you click on the B&W inset photo and enlarge you can make out Universal Clamp Company on the side of the screw end of the clamp. Those are mine exactly. They are OK but have small clamping heads and the bars bend easily. I have the 48 and 72 inch varieties.
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On 11/02/2015 9:15 AM, Leon wrote:

You must have a _much_ higher res monitor than I to be able to make anything whatever out of what the casting actually says... :)
I've not used the Dubuque's simply know they've been rated pretty highly and that Lee Valley says they're quite stiff and ime that's generally pretty reliable assessment...
I'm certain they're not as stiff as an old t-bar cabinet clamp and that if you're trying to squeeze the be-jxxx out of a heavy panel glue they can be caused to flex but I'd think them likely to be more than adequate for most work.
Anyway, they're surely bound to be far better than the HF or local Ace Chinese variety or even the Jorgy's...
--


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On 11/2/2015 9:33 AM, dpb wrote:

27". And while not perfectly in focus, zoomed in you can see the individual letters and the L on the end of Universal.

They are not bad clamps for light duty work and probably better in shorter sizes but you have to clamp them down to the work on longer pieces so that they do not bow. This is especially true with thin panel glue ups.
And they are certainly light weight. One thing I especially do not care for is the ratchet end. I moves in increments of approximately 1/2 the screw travel. I found myself having to walk from one end to the other a time or two to get the moveable end in a location that did not reach the limit of the screw end in either direction. If you are in a hurry to set the clamps in a complicated glue up this is a bit nerve racking. ;~) Just food for thought. I pretty much quit them altogether when I started collecting the K-body style clamps.

them before they begin to bend.
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On 11/2/2015 10:15 AM, Leon wrote:

clamping. (broken Cabinet masters).
I clamp tight, but not ridiculously tight.
I do find that I use my aluminum clamps when weight is a problem. Or if I just want to. I don't find them to be so bad.
--
Jeff

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On Mon, 02 Nov 2015 08:44:56 -0600

had never heard of these i read a review on one of their odd clamps with the novel grip mechanism
the reviewer complained that the face of the clamp left a mark on his piece
i guess he never heard of scrap maybe they have the guy at the store cut everything to final fit
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Or more likely, the reviewer expected them to be similar to the Bessy K-Body clamps, where it is unnecessary to protect the work from the clamp face.
Aside from Dubuque being a very pretty place (particularly arriving from US 61 N), those clamps are quite nice and affordable. The small clamp face does require clamping pads to avoid marring the work.
If you consider Iowa to be flat, you've never been to Dubuque.
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On 11/4/2015 10:31 AM, Scott Lurndal wrote:

TRUE! Same style Jet clamp, Not so true. If Jet would fix this their clamps would be great with more features than Bessey and the Cabinet Masters combined.

I used the exact same aluminum clamps for years and oddly I don't ever recall the clamps faces marring the work and I did not use scraps. In fact the only clamps that I have used that do mar the wood are the Jet clones and the old style pipe clamps.

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On Wednesday, November 4, 2015 at 11:39:17 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Having not used any of the 3 aforementioned clamps, this question comes from a deep, deep state of ignorance...
How hard would it be to fashion a "false front" for the Jet clamps to eliminate the marring?
I'm thinking about some clamps pads that I have that fall off if they are not held on when clamping (almost the same as using scraps) vs. some clamps that have fitted pads semi-permanently attached. (Look Ma, no hands!)
Couldn't something be done with the Jet clamps to turn them into the superior clamps that you want them to be?
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On 11/4/2015 2:35 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Probably not too hard but certainly harder than simply buying the same priced Jorgensen Cabinet Master clamps. The only advantage that the Jet has IHMO in this comparison is that it has a release trigger that holds the moveable end in place. And that is not that is not that big of a deal. If the Jet's came with the non mar surface they would get the nod.

Double stick carpet tape.

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On Wednesday, November 4, 2015 at 4:45:48 PM UTC-6, Leon wrote: .

Before we had all the nice clamp options that we enjoy now, first by necess ity and second by need, we used to drill tiny holes in the metal faces of o ur Pony clamps, bar clamps, etc, and screw pieces of white pine on them (fr om the back)to make softer, wider jaws. Worked like a champ, and got the a dditional clamping power of making a jaw as wide as you wanted. Since we us ed a lot of 1x2 cedar when I was framing houses (think shingle molding and vent trims) we simply cut off six inch pieces as needed and screwed them on the faces when we were doing cabinet work. They did great as they spread the compressed load across a surface more evenly, and even added to the uti lity of the clamp by its increased jaw size.
With today's plastic jaws with larger faces, I am sure double stick tape wo uld do the trick.
Robert
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On 11/5/2015 2:04 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

side. Hummmmmmmmmmmmmmm. I'll have to see of a magnet will stick to the Jet clamp surface.
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On 11/05/2015 7:41 AM, Leon wrote:

I just got accustomed to using a full-length caul resting on the clamp bodies so never worried about the individual pads...it's still so ingrown a practice I don't even think of pads...guess everybody grows up different. :)
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On 11/5/2015 8:04 AM, dpb wrote:

project. BUT I do use a couple of pieces of plywood for helping to insure that rails fit properly at the ends of stiles on cabinet doors. And that uses 8 clamps initially and then just 2 once everything is squared up.
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On Thu, 05 Nov 2015 08:04:44 -0600

i had never seen cauls until recently might have been lee valley but not sure
they were not cheap but i like the idea it is clever and gives some more versatility to the clamps i have
did you buy them or make them what wood species are they made from i would guess oak or ash or hard maple maybe kiln dried too
any other tips tricks etc about them you can share would be good
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Buying a caul seems pretty silly for a woodworker.
You do realize that woodworkers were quite successful without pipe clamps, fancy K-bodies or any manufactured clamp?
Consider what you can do with a couple of wedges and a caul, for example.
The caul should be slightly sprung.
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