Suggestions on new compressor?

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I'd really like to replace my 5 year old Harbor Fright compressor before we move at the end of the year..
It's their 2 hp, 5 gallon, 110v model... works ok, but it's loud and cheaply built..
I'd like something that size or a bit larger... but as quiet as possible, which I'm hoping is available with new technology and/or more money...
110v or 220, doesn't matter as the new shop will have both...
Most common use besides blowing dust around are a couple of small brad drivers and the possible addition of an air drill and sander...
Any suggestions/recommendatons appreciated.. Mac
https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis https://home.comcast.net/~mac.davis/wood_stuff.htm
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Small compressores are inherently louder than the larger all cast iron oil lubed versions. Until you get into belt driven vs the direct drive models you are going to have to deal with loud. That said many newer small compressors are better than others but still are pretty loud by comparison to the type mentioned above. Have the store demo the compressor to you so that you can hear it before buying. Also have them compare the small ones to a larger belt driven one for a comparison. IMHO a lot of the noise is due to the fact that the smaller direct drive units run at a much higher speed.

Basically you have listed uses that go from one extreme to the other. Blowing air for short periods and running nail guns up to framing nailers do not require a high volume compressor. Drills and sanders on the other hand are pretty high volume users and would be better matched with a bare minimum 20 gal style compressor IMHO.
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good points.. the HF is oil lubed but not belt driven... I've even seen recommendations in this group to separate the motor from the pump, which is hard to do if it isn't belt driven.. *g*

yeah.. the drill and sanders would be if the compressor supported them, not really tools that I need... (not that need ever determines tool purchases in my house)
I was going to buy a nice Craftsman 220v compressor that Bill Noble had rebuilt... 220v, 2 hp, 29 gal... but the cost of picking it up raised the price to almost new... still looking..
thanks, Leon Mac
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mac davis wrote:

My take on compressors and air driven sanders is that you basically need a compressor that runs on 220v if you are to have sufficient horsepower to meet the high CFM requirements of sanders. So if you think you might ever go air-driven sanders, you might consider their requirements now as you decide what compressor you are going to with.
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Thanks, John.. my thoughts, sort-of-exactly.. lol
The new shop will have 22v, a luxury that I've never had before, so I'm leaning toward 220 or dual voltage machines.. Mac
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mac davis wrote:
> I'd really like to replace my 5 year old Harbor Fright compressor before we move > at the end of the year..
<snip>
I'll stay out of the air compressor selection, but offer a suggestion about the distribution.
Hang a 20 ft length of 2" pipe with a 1/4" per ft slope that has 3/4" side taps pointing UP every 4-5 ft and a drain at the low point.
Plug the unused ones.
Use two (2), 3/4" street ells as a take off which will now have the opening pointing down.
Connect hose to the down pointing connection.
Why do all the above?
"Better air" is the answer.
1) You increase the storage capacity. 2) The air will be cooler, thus hold less water. 3) The street ells force the air to change direction which allows more water to drop out.
It is a low cost way of improving the performance of what ever compressor you select.
Lew
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I printed this one out, Lew... too early in the morning to understand it.. maybe after more caffeine.. *lol*
I do plan to put the DC and compressor out in the carport, so I'll be looking seriously at your suggestion..

Mac
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mac davis wrote:
> I printed this one out, Lew... too early in the morning to understand it.. maybe > after more caffeine.. *lol*
You get a plumbing distributor to cut and thread a 20 ft length of 2" pipe into 4 ft lengths.
After that, "It's time for some assembly", as Norm would say using 2"x2"x3/4" reducing tees.
BTW, if you can swing it, a 5HP, 2 stage compressor with an 80 gal vertical tank is very tough to beat.
You will be able to operate some serious air tools.
Lew
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Now there's a man to listen to!
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wrote:

For sure... I could nail some really big stuff until the glue dries... *g*
Mac
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On Fri, 23 Jun 2006 07:32:26 -0700, mac davis

Compressors, pressure washers and a few other things in life in my experience are alike in that it is EASY to get one that is 'just a little bit smaller that I would have liked', but almost impossible to buy one that results in the owner's commenting 'Gosh, this is just too big, I wish I would have gotten one a little smaller....'
I have a 11 hp pressure washer and a 7hp air compressor. I have asked myself ' I wonder what a little more HP would be like...' although I am very happy with the performance of both units. In both cases I bought the biggest one I could afford at the time and have never regretted it a bit. regards, Joe.
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Sounds very expensive, Lew.. what's a 2 stage compressor?? Mac
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mac davis wrote:
> Sounds very expensive, Lew..
My guess is about $800-$900.
Have had one about 10 years.
They are sweet.
>what's a 2 stage compressor??
2 cylinder, primary and secondary with an intercooler in between stages.
Lew
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That would be for a small one. A decent 5HP 60 or 80 gal unit is going to run $1200 and up.

When I had to replace my compressor I went on the hunt for a two stage. Long story short, I ended up with a commercial duty single stage, but it has two of the biggest pistons I've ever seen. You might say it has a nice pair of jugs. I was a bit nervous at first, but I've long since gotten over that. This thing just flat out puts out air. MSRP on these is around $1500-$1600.
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Mike Marlow wrote:
> > That would be for a small one. A decent 5HP 60 or 80 gal unit is going to > run $1200 and up.
Usually, HD has or had a pretty decent price.
Haven't looked lately.
$1200 sounds a bit much.
Lew
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"mac davis"

Who would'nt!

Like Leon said, brad nailers are no problem, however air drills and sanders require a high CFM. Look into a compressor that has a oiled cast iron pump. You're going to spend $700+ for a quality unit.
Dave
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On Mon, 19 Jun 2006 07:34:28 -0700, mac davis

I have a DeWalt 55155. Oil-lubed iron compressor, induction motor, direct drive. Not exactly quiet, but at least tolerable indoors. 4-gallon tank is fine for running a couple of finish nailers. Drills and sanders, however, are another story. They require vastly more air than nailers; you'll need something much more than a "bit" larger for those. More like a 20-30 gallon tank. Check the cubic foot per minute requirement of the tools you want to use, and make sure the compressor can supply that much continuous air.
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Ding, ding, ding . . . you qualify for the 220 volt 80 gallon upright compressor to run that sander and air drill. Find the nearest home center or Tractor Supply and find their Ingersoll-Rand 60 or 80 gallon upright unit. Two-stage pump would be even better. Pick up a sandblaster while you're there. Some extra 1/2" air hose; maybe 50-100 feet, would help you go outside for those dirty projects that you don't want to handle inside the shop. You won't be portable but you will be powerful.
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On Mon, 19 Jun 2006 21:50:54 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@antispam.net (Bill) wrote:

yeah, I see that the drill and sander are a distraction to my search... I'm happy with the electric stuff that I have, and don't really use the nailers much, though I might if the compressor was quieter..
After talking to Robohippy about trying to use an air drill for bowl sanding, I think I'll stay with my electric stuff...
I'm mainly looking for quiet and the possibility of adding a larger tank if needed so that it could be left on most of the time but set to run only when the pressure in the tank dropped... Mac
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"mac davis" wrote in message

we move

cheaply
which
drivers
Besides a recently blown Porter Cable pancake, I have a stop gap Craftsman 1 HP, vertical 12 gal oiler that is relatively quiet, but it would not be good for AD and sander. (My needs are portability and small footprint over scfm).
Don't discount a Craftsman if you're wanting to go inexpensive ... I gave a lot of thought to their Model 19541, which is, IIRC, a pretty good buy if you have the space for a horizontal tank. After looking closely, the Craftsman still appear to be better built than the cheaper Kobalt/Coleman, Porter Cable/Devilbliss and Husky/Campbell Hausfeld offerings, although the quietest I heard in the midsize units was the Husky/Campbell Hausfeld VT6315.
If I ever find the time to build that new shop, I am going to look at Grainger's for a big SpeedAire, or something similar. My dad has had one for 30 years that is so quiet you can hardly hear it run 10 feet away.
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