Suggestions on how to open a frozen chuck on a hand drill


Hello,
I have just been given a bunch of old hand tools from a friend whose father recently passed away. One of them is an old Miller Falls eggbeater-type drill. It runs a bit stiff but I think if I clean up the three gears, it should run smoothly enough.
My problem is the chuck. It seems to be frozen shut. I cannot loosen it at all. When I try, the entire chuck begins to unscrew but the mouth (is that what it is called?) doesn't budge.
Is there a way I can resolve this problem? The chuck is shut entirely and there is no space whatsoever where I can even put a drill bit or something in to help open it up.
I would really like to get the drill working and start using it!
Thanks!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Put it in a vice and tap the jaws, with a piece of wood on the jaws and tap the wood with an hammer.
--
Sir Benjamin Middlethwaite




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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Try submerging the chuck in a small bowl of thin oil for a day or so. I have done this several times with good results.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

I'd start by spraying the chuck with "PB Blaster".
http://www.blasterchemical.com/store/moreinfo.cfm?Product_ID=1
It should be available at you local auto parts store.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

sounds like this stash of tools is just right for setting up an electrolysis derusting rig. it's cheap, works REALLY well, and is easy and non-toxic.
<http://www.stovebolt.com/techtips/rust/electrolytic_derusting.htm
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

The first thing I'd try is to clamp it in a vise with the chuck up, then squirt some penetrating oil (e.g. Liquid Wrench or CRC 5-56, *not* WD-40) onto the jaws of the chuck and allow it to run down inside. Repeat a couple of times, a few hours apart, then allow it to sit there overnight, and try again in the morning.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Wow--these are a bunch of good suggestions (and probably ones I should have thunk of on my own!). I am sure one or a combination of these will do the trick.
Thanks a lot!!
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wrote:

Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
i have often seen WD-40 recommended for freeing up stuff. would be grateful to hear why you think its not so good please.
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Torge wrote:
> i have often seen WD-40 recommended for freeing up stuff. would be grateful > to hear why you think its not so good please.
I use a lot of WD40 for many things, but much prefer Kroil from Kano Labs to get corroded (rusted) items apart.
Lew
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Just for the record, the jaws weren't rusted shut. I sprayed a ton of WD-40 all over the chuck and let it sit for about 15 minutes. There was one heck of a lot of black gunk that I assume was old oil and dirt that came out. Once I scrubbed it with an old toothbrush and wiped it clean, I still needed to push the jaws open the first 3 or 4 times I loosened the chuck but thereafter, the jaws opened and closed very nicely.
So in this case, WD-40 seemed to do the trick!
Lew Hodgett wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Try freezing it. If no go, try heating it. Alternate the two.
--

dadiOH
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Don't heat it too much - i.e. not so much that you temper the metal.
Personally, I'd throw LOTS of thin oil on it and let it sit overnight... Maybe even penetrating oil like Kroil. BUT when it was finally moving, I'd lube the heck out of it.
--


Regards,
Joe Agro, Jr.
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Hi,
I publish a website where you can find resolution to your question. www.wkFineTools.com
And here is specific article:
http://www.wkfinetools.com/restore/tuningEggbeater/index.asp
There is a section dedicated to tool restoration:
http://www.wkfinetools.com/restore/index.asp
where you can find all kind of info.
Wiktor
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snipped-for-privacy@wkFineTools.com wrote:

Great Site!! Thanks!
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snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:
> > I have just been given a bunch of old hand tools from a friend whose > father recently passed away. One of them is an old Miller Falls > eggbeater-type drill. It runs a bit stiff but I think if I clean up > the three gears, it should run smoothly enough. > > My problem is the chuck. It seems to be frozen shut. I cannot loosen > it at all. When I try, the entire chuck begins to unscrew but the > mouth (is that what it is called?) doesn't budge.
Soak it for a couple of days in Kroil from Kano Labs.
Lew
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