suggestions for removing rust from a stanley handplane from the 50's?

I'd like to clean up an old stanley (only sentimental value, no $ value) handplane. I've flattened the sides and sole, refinished the handles, and squared the blade so far.
Before I sharpen the blade I'd like to removed the rust (a considerable amount) from the non-cutting part of the blade, chipbreaker and all the other rusty componants. Its not surface rust, but quite severe and the metal is proably quite pitted underneat.
Any suggestions for a product to put on it? I'd like something that requires as little elbow grease as possible as I used all mine just flattening the soles and sides!
Also, any idea what I can use to clean up what I assume is black paint on the top side of the plane. There are too many grooves and hollows to get down there with any abrasives, any suggestions?
One last question, I notice surface rust forms on the newly shiney, flattend sole and sides almost overnight, any suggestions what to put on it when I'm not using it to prevent this?
Thanks in advance.
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*snip*

I'd try Johnson's Paste Wax. It's very commonly used for saw tables, which can rust in the way you're describing. You'll find it in the floor products aisle.
Puckdropper
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You can only do so much with caulk, cardboard, and duct tape.

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Naval Jelly.

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Naval Jelly attacks iron. Electrolysis or molasses stops at the rust.
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Molasses. Natural chelating agent, has a strong affinity for iron oxide, which explains its value as a dietary iron source.
1 part molasses, 3 parts water, sufficient to cover the part to be derusted. Leave submerged 1 week, rinse clean, oil immediately.
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"Father Haskell" wrote

Is this done while drinking herbal tea and eating bean sprouts?
<G>
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Those aren't bean sprouts, those are mash for the 'shine.
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I'd never heard of the molasses trick, either. But it seems the old boy knows his treacle. ;) http://virtualindian.org/projrust.htm
R
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"Father Haskell" wrote

Wonder if the sulpher in the black strap has anything to do with it?
Let's see, Rum, Baked Beans and now Rust Removal.
Wonder what is next?
Lew
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Desulfured molasses works fine.
Molasses is the leftover syrup from sugar extraction. A crude vegetable product, it contains many countless organic compounds, some of which are chelating agents. "Chelate" comes from the Greek word for claw. Chelating agents surround target molecules like claws, making them in many cases easier for plants or animals to absorb.

Plant food. Many of the desirable microbial symbiotes in healthy, unspoiled garden soil can use the sugars in molasses as food, especially in presence of oxygen. Compost "teas" can be activated into high octane organic rocket fuel simply by mixing with a shot of molasses and aerating with a ten dollar aquarium air pump. Microbial populations will explode by factors of up to 1,000 within 24 hours.
Simply spraying molasses over a target area of soil would probably have the same effect.
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I use electrolysis on the old tools I reclaim. Links below. Your "black paint" is likely japanning (Google it). You can leave it as is or an extended stay in the electrolysis solution will remove it. Rustoleum black paint will help keep future rust at bay.
http://www.davidbradley.net/ERR.html http://woodmangler.com/Derusting/electrolytic%20derusting.html http://www.wr6wr.com/newSite/articles/columns/wp0906/wp0906.html http://www.bhi.co.uk/hints/rust.htm http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/andyspatch/rust.htm http://www.stovebolt.com/techtips/rust/electrolytic_derusting.htm
Art

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I agree with the methods to remove the rust. The trick part now is in keeping the rust away. The trick I have used on surfaces that do not contact wood, but you still want the "bare metal" look, is a coating of clear krylon. The areas of the tool that will contact the wood, need to be treat differently. The issue becomes the transfer of any protective coating to the wood surface. It can really cause unwanted results when finishing the wood. On those surfaces a thin coat of natural wax works well. The best way to keep the rust from the surfaces that contact the wood is to use the tool often. sounds simplistic, but I have never seen rust on the surface of part of the handrailing everyone touches. The other thing to keep in mind is simple. The higher the moister content in the tools environment, the more rust. I have a basement shop in the northeast near the coast. before I installed automatic dehumidifier, I could swear I could see the rust forming before my eyes. With the dehumidifier, rust is still there but only in very mild cases. Good luck
Paul

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OP here,
Thanks for all the great advice. Father Haskell, I thought you were pulling my leg when you suggested Molasses. Glad others chimed in. I'll try it on the frog this weekend for the next week to see what happens...
Thanks to the other posters about the various waxes to try and even the dehumidifier suggestion.
I have quite a rust-active environment so I need to get a bit more proactive. Some mornings the temp of my garage is so much colder that than the outside temps, that if I leave the doors open for more than a few minutes, condensation beads up on almost every metal surface in the garage - just like the water beading down a cold glass of ice tea on a hot day.
Oh well, I suppose those days I should just leave the doors closed!
Thanks again to all for their advice, I'll start experimenting...

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snipped-for-privacy@Nospam.net says...

I'm not sure if anyone else mentioned this, but if the plane is not an antique, you could use your Dremel and a buffing wheel made from those green scrubbies. You get rid of the rust right away. I waxed mine afterwards to keep the rust away.
S.
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