Suggestions for making a "ring"

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Waterwheel. So having the inside smooth is fine as the bottom of the buckets will attach there. Outside rough is fine and preferred. Router and center point it is! Thanks!
George wrote:

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Mark, Be careful when routing the inside of the ring. Tape blocks or dowels in as you go or double stick tape the ring to a scrap to hold it secure. Dave
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wrote:

make the first pass or three end up cutting about 3/4 of the way through. then cut down the middle of the route with a jigsaw and finish the cut with a flush trom bit in the router.

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Thanks Dave! I'll actually have the spokes in place. I'll route just shy of the spokes and finish over them with a utility knife. The router will do more of a trim job than anything. No moving or binding of major pieces will be involved. Here is the building the waterwheel will be installed on. Bottom photo, left side of "mill." http://www.bunchobikes.com/pond6.htm Neighbor got a new fence, I got the redwood to reclaim for the mill, water wheel, bait shack, etc, etc! Grist mill is 6'x6', 6' tall and , as stated, the water wheel is 4' diameter.
TeamCasa wrote:

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Mark and Kim, That looks like a fun project!
I just hope your not the ones responsible for breeding the West Nile carrying mosquitoes! :)
Dave
wrote:

center
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That's a myth about ponds! The water may attract mosquitos, but the fish eat the larvae faster than the bugs can lay eggs. Especially the specialized Mosquito Fish. Free food for the fishies! So lay all you want, West Nile! But you can't win here!!
TeamCasa wrote:

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Gambusia aside, you have a lot of nature study to do if you think that's a valid statement.

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Mark and Kim Smith wrote:

Sabre Saw?
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A "routah" with a circle cutting jig is what you want/need.
Home made from 1/4" plywood or store bought made out of plastic.
A straight cutting bit and a base that can be cut into(like mdf) and you will be in business.
Mark and Kim Smith wrote:

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On 27 Jul 2004 12:30:13 EDT, Mark and Kim Smith

What material? What purpose? Plywood? Cut with a jigsaw, and then file. You won't see the flaws driving past at 40. Good wood for fine furniture? Cut close with a jigsaw, then finish with a router, guided from the outside edge.
Bill.
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Just use a router with a 1/2 inch straight bit set it up on a 6 inch wide board with the bit centered at 3 Inch from the edge and side of the board. Then measure back 24 inch from the inside of the bit and 14inch from the out side of the bit drill two holes on these marks then use the same drill bit and drill a hole in the center of a 48 by 48 sheet of ply or MDF cut your outer circle first and then your inter circle do not cut all the way through the material leave about 1/8 th of an inch then cut out with a jig saw and trim down with a flush trim bit. Always use the radius of a circle to cut one with this method.A good rule of thumb is always convert any measurement under 12 feet to inches only and you will avoid a lot of mistakes.
Chris

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I know a lot of people have replied already, and I haven't read all of the replys so I apologize if this is a duplicate, but why can't you use a circle jig with your router. It is really pretty simple. Basically a compass for the router...Probably what you are doing for your bandsaw, just substitute a router bit for the bandsaw blade and turn the jig upside down.
Take something such as a 1x4 (in this case about 30" long), pick out a router bushing, drill a hole near the end of the 1x4 to fit the OD of the bushing. Now pick out a straight bit for the router, (a carbide spiral bit works well) such as a 1/2" diameter. Use a nail for the center point at the appropriate distance to give the desired radius. (Make sure to watch which edge of the bit you measure from.
3 passes on your material and you should have a perfect circle.
--Rick
On 27 Jul 2004 12:30:13 EDT, Mark and Kim Smith

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