Suggestion for finish on white oak w/walnut small chest

I'm building a small chest out of white oak with a lid made of walnut and white oak.
I have used a number of different types of finishes so far, but I'm still mostly a cluesless newby, so I would apreciate some advice (or direction) on what sort of finish I should use.
It will be used outside in historical recreationist camping (S.C.A.), so it needs to be somewhat weather resistant, and not look "modern"
I would guess laquer? Should I stain the oak at all? I know that walnut shouldn't be stained, but a tough of color in the oak would be nice.
One more thing, please. I've used grain filler on red oak projects. Should I use this on the white oak?
Thanks for your advice.
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Don't stain the oak. Get a can of Shellac and it will look beautiful. Watch the date on the bottom of the can when you buy it. It's only good for a little over 6 months. Looks great on oak and walnut.
Tim

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
TDUP wrote:

I'm sure it would, but won't the finish get messed up if, say, the box gets rained on?
Jim H

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Jim Helfer wrote:

But, I could cover the shellace with laquer to protect it maybe? I wasn't sure that this was possible. But I DAGS and find an article by a Mr. "George Utley" (Isn't there a Newhart character by that name?) that talks about it.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
make sure you use dewaxed shellac, Jim. Seal Coat by Zinnser is de-waxed and suitable for use with poly, or lacquers.
David
Jim Helfer wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
www.homesteadfinishing.com has an article about selecting a finish that probably would help. Don't believe lacquer or shellac are suggested for outside use.
On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 19:20:36 -0400, Jim Helfer

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net wrote:

Not even lacquer? Hmm. Glad I asked. Maybe a polurethane that doesn't look so much like plastic?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 28 Jul 2004 19:20:36 -0400, Jim Helfer

So don't use walnut then. Not a period timber.
OTOH, the main timber of the SCA is plywood, so I guess anything solid is an improvement.

Medieval repro is an interest of mine (you might be interested in a long series of posts of mine to rec.org.sca on the historical introduction of shellac).
So for authenticity, I'd use polyurethane.
Just to clarify that, simple authenticity is easy - no finishing at all. It just didn't happen.
Shellac is a great finish and I use it a lot. But it's not authentic, it doesn't look right (maybe a very thin application, dulled with rottenstone afterwards), it's not especially water resistant, and it's not mechanically strong against getting humped around campsites.
So what I use is one or two _maximum_ thin coats of gel poly (I use "Patina" in the UK). This is blatant cheating, but it has good weather resistance and such a thin coating of it is damn near invisible.

This is always a tough call. Are you making a reproduction that looks like new, or that looks like an original piece looks today / after many years of service ? Remember that even medieval furniture was new once (although remember Monty Python's sage advice - "You can tell he's the king, he hasn't got much shit on him")
Personally I never stain oak and very rarely dye it. If I colour it, it's ammonia fuming every time. The way oak darkens with age is through oxidation and that's the same as ammonia does to it. Use vapour fuming for a brown oak, or wet solutions brushed on to turn it the real black of "Jacobean" oak.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.