Strike Plate for Safety Matches?

Hi all,
I am going to make a box to hold matches, and would like to build in a durable strike plate. Do any of you know what material would be suitable for the purpose? I know next to nothing about them, but I am guessing that "safety matches" require something specific from the strike surface: does anybody know what?
Obviously, I'm trying to avoid the obvious solution of providing a slot in which we would slide the strike from the cardboard box the matches came in.
Many thanks for any replies.
Kitto (no email, sorry...)
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Business card size diamond sharpener - or a piece of sandpaper.
Bob S.

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Won't work. Read it again. SAFETY MATCHES.

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Bob S. responds:

Some years ago, I built a matchbox for fireplace matches. It had a strike plate on its bottom...I used, IIRC, 220 or 320 grit wet and dry for that, contact cemented in place.
A friend has been using it off and on for years now, and all is well. When it goe, replacement is simple.
Charlie Self "Politics: A strife of interests masquerading as a contest of principles. The conduct of public affairs for private advantage. " Ambrose Bierce
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But those aren't safty matches.

plate
contact
it
The
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snipped-for-privacy@host.com wrote:

See:
http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/aug97/867070080.Ch.r.html
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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The strikeplate has chemicals in it that you don't want to mess with! http://www.madsci.org/posts/archives/aug97/867070080.Ch.r.html Bill
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snipped-for-privacy@host.com wrote:

Safety matches require a "scratch" surface with red phosporus in it. Since there is no phosporous in the match head. As the surface is used the material gets used up so the surface has a limited life. Either go with the old white tiped matches, "strike anywhere" or use the box side as srtiker. ...lew...
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Thank you everybody for the rapid and helpful responses. I'm somewhat embarrassed, as I should have found for myself the information on the chemical reaction involved with safety matches...
I'm still undecided whether I'll only accomodate strike-anywhere matches (I like the idea of a file), or whether I'll fashion some kind of slot to hold the strike plate from the original cardboard box of safety matches. I need to check just how readily available are strike-anywhere matches.
I'm also toying with the issue of where to place the strike plate. I suppose that affixing it under the lid would be hazardous (the risk being that something could fall and light the rest of the matches in the box). Under the box would be inconvenient. The top, front or sides would be an eyesore (though if the material is a metal file, perhaps not, hmm...). I'm considering placing the strikeplate in a removable frame which rests above the matches themselves. Anybody have any suggestions or advice?
Many thanks! Oh and feel free to tell me it's just a damn match box, and to slap it together, already! :-)
-Kitto (sorry, no email)
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snipped-for-privacy@host.com wrote:

According to Diamond's web page, you should be able to find them at most grocery stores. A camping supply outlet would be another place to purchase them. If you have a problem locating them here's an on-line source:
http://www.emergencyresources.com/er_p11.html
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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Most of us here know what you are making, it is not "just a damn match box", it is a piece of your heart and soul meant as a gift. We take a lot of time on things like that. Ed snipped-for-privacy@snet.net http://pages.cthome.net/edhome
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wrote:

Or (as in most of the things I make) it's a displacement activity from what I should be doing, but I'm trying to avoid.

Likewise.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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I've kept a piece of sandpaper in a container with strike-anywhere matches for camping, for as long as I can remember, without any incidents of accidental combustion. While it may be possible for the striker on the inside of the lid to be a danger, It wouldn't keep me from sleeping at night if this box were in my house.
I also second the idea of using a section from a small file as the striker since the strike-anywhere matches are easy enough to find
-David
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He wasn't talking about 'spontaneous' light-off. But when actually _striking_ a light, and having a 'stray' bit of scraped-off flaming material land on one of the matches inside the box, setting off the rest of the box.
It _is_ a valid consideration.
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What about on the top or side under a sliding cover?

-- jc Published e-mail address is strictly for spam collection. If e-mailing me, please use jc631 at optonline dot net
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Use the extra-long cook's matches. They're non-safety (assuming you don't live in some nanny-state) and generally better as matches. Most smokers these days use lighters and gas stoves have spark ignition. If you're still using matches, chances ar that you're lighting candles, woodstoves, pipes or other non-flammable items. The long matches are just better for this sort of thing. As a striker, the best thing (lasts forever) is a piece of a coarse file. Silicon carbide paper (black "wet and dry") also lasts quite well - 120 grit does it.
If you're stuck with safeties, recycle the box side. You could make your own, but you'd need red phosphorous. As this is also used for drug manufacture (not to mention nerve agents), it's very hard to get hold of.
If you live near me, you can also go out to the fields of "Dig your own" white phosphorous, courtesy of an exploding phosphorous plant a few years ago. Recent roadbuilding was fun to watch, because when the grader took the first topsoil off, the little fragments of phosphorous would dry out and spontaneously combust with a puff of smoke.
-- Die Gotterspammerung - Junkmail of the Gods
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snipped-for-privacy@codesmiths.com says...

You tweaked my memory. There was once a study, who knows how good, that said smokers who used lighters had an even higher cancer risk than those who didn't. Something about the hydrocarbons, IIRC. It made me stick to matches (until I quit) :-).
--
Where ARE those Iraqi WMDs?

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Hi Kitto,
You're correct in that safety matches do need something from the striking surface. Dunno what it is, but I've managed to strike safety matches on normal - not toughened - window glass in an emergency. It's not that easy, since normal glass is pretty smooth, but you might try a piece of frosted glass.
No, I'm taking the piss!
Let us know how it goes.
Cheers
Frank

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The match head is coated with potassium chlorate, and the strike surface is covered with red phosphorus. Without the phosphorus, you won't get the matches to light.
http://jchemed.chem.wisc.edu/JCESoft/CCA/CCA3/MAIN/MATCHES/PAGE1.HTM
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Just a piece of trivia: You won't get the match to ignite with a "normal" strike, however, with enough friction & heat, you CAN light a safety match on a suitqble surface. If you try a regular book match and strike it fast enough, it is possible to light it on a dollar bill.
--

Larry Wasserman Baltimore, Maryland
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