Straightening S2S boards on the Table Saw

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For years I have been using a jig to straighten my boards on my table saw, it does a much better and faster job than my jointer. The Walnut Desk that I recently built and posted pictures of had 2, 15" x 60" panels made up of 3 boards each. The desk top 31" x 60" was made from 6 glued up boards. All edges were prepared on the TS using the jig and a 40 tooth Forrest WWII. The joints for the most part are undetectable unless the grain was significantly different or unless you looked at the ends of the panels.
The current Woodsmith magazine, No. 178, has a picture of a jig that uses the exact same technique and method that I use but their jog is a bit more refined. I highly recommend checking out this issue if you are interested in making straight glue line joints whether you have a jointer or not.
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On Mon, 21 Jul 2008 16:10:32 -0500, "Leon"

Sorry, but my take on reactionary wood is -- don't use it. I have a solid oak diningroom table that was fine for many years, but one particularly dry summer, it split along the glue joint. If you joint a piece of reactionary wood and use it in an application that has significantly different humidity, it is going to warp or curl unless you are using it in a application that uses short pieces.
Ed
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wrote:

I'm a little confused here Ed. What does reactionary wood have to do with straightening S2S on a TS instead of on a jointer?
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wrote:

wood? I wouldn't touch the stuff either.
Tim W
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Reactionary wood is wood that was improperly dried and or wood that may have been under stress while the tree was growing. Typically wood taken from limbs that grow closer to horizontal will have more internal stress. This becomes a problem when sawing/ripping. As you rip the board it will tend to want to close back up and pinch the blade or it can bow open, either way you end up with a board that is no longer straight.
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Leon wrote:

So, wood that bends before you use it is proactive wood? <G>
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On Tue, 22 Jul 2008 07:43:03 -0500, "Leon"

Leon, I was working from the comment that the OP wanted to "straighten" the wood. I have no issues with using the TS to joint a rough or uneven edge on a plank, indeed, that is my preference. If the wood is curved, however, I will usually pass on it or try to salvage a shorter piece.
Ed
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Well Ed, I am the OP and I would sure like to find out where you get S2S lumber that is straight, does not come in random widths, and is not narrower on one end.
Perhaps you are buying S3S or S2S ripped straight on 1 edge.
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On Mon, 21 Jul 2008 16:10:32 -0500, "Leon"

Good advice. I have a very good jointer, but oft times the wood supplied by my cranky old local sawmill owner represents a significant challange at least to get to a starting point for jointing.
Think I'll look into it.
Frank
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Frank Boettcher wrote:

Mine isn't refined at all - but it was easy to build and has worked for me. Photos at the link below.
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Mine is very much like yours Morris, I have the 2 toggle clamps mounted on 2 small wood blocks. I screw the 2 wood blocks down where ever needed. I do however use a 8' long sled that is about 11" wide.
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wrote:

What the heck - you got a cherry outfeed table?!?!
Renata
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Renata wrote:

In my dreams! It's _really_ cheap luan-faced 3/4" plywood.
(But I do like the way you think <g>)
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Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Morris Dovey wrote:

You can see just how cheap by following the link below and looking at the 4th photo from the bottom of the page...
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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Varnish makes pressure treated pine look good at a distance. I have seen some luan panels that looked pretty nice and when you add "any" finish, it looks better.
It "is" mahogany.
Morris Dovey wrote:

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snipped-for-privacy@iedu.com says...

Unrelated question: It looks like your shop is in a garage? Is there a problem with rust? I'm moving to Alabama next week and finally will buy a table/cabinet saw (we're done moving for a long while). Since basements are rare where there isn't ground frost I was wondering what to do with cast iron tools.
BTW, a lot of good hints. Thanks.
--
Keith

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krw wrote:

Sort of - it's in an aircraft hanger.

It's been unusually humid this year (not far from my shop they were measuring the humidity in feet, so I guess I shouldn't complain) - and I've seen even more rusting than usual.

The tools that are most used seem to be those that show the rust least. My suggestion would be to maximize tool usage. :-)

Thank /you/ for the feedback!
--
Morris Dovey
DeSoto Solar
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says...

I'll chime in here ifin you don't mind. I live in Houston and rust is pretty much a nonissue unless I am careless. Humidity on a dry day is 50% and 75-80% is the norm. Humidity is not a problem, it is when the humidity condenses on the tools surface that you have a problem I actually have more of a problem with sweat dripping on the tool surface. If your tool is cool and exposed to humid warm air you will have a problem. If you air condition the room and warm humid air is introduced you will have a problem. As long as the equipment remains the same temperature as the humid air around it you should not have a problems with condensation and rust. For those times where you might not have the perfect environment apply 3-4 heavy coats of TopCote initially to the cast iron surfaces and buff off. Follow up with and extra coat every 6 months or so.
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snipped-for-privacy@swbell.net says...

Certainly not. (sorry for not gettin back sooner - packing for the move and just finishing up at work here).

Careless? Like spill a drink, careless?

Yes, but in my basement (in Vermont) I could more easily control the environment with a dehumidifier. Heat was never a problem because the humidity in the Winter was shockingly low.

This stuff??
http://www.glubie.com/01_Pages/lubricants.htm
I would have thought a wax, or perhaps a teflon based "wax" like the stuff used on boat bottoms.
Thanks. Now to figure out which saw. ;-)
--
Keith

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.

Yes that, or sweat on the iron and not wiping it off.

I think regardless of the humidity level, high or low, it will not be a problem unless the temperature of the surrounding air suddenly becomes warmer than the iron. Even with a dehumidifiier, if a glass of ice water sweats during temperature changes, so will the iron if it is colder than the surrounding air, and it takes very little moisture to start the rust. This can be more of a problem in an air conditioned shop for cooling purposes if it is suddenly exposed to an opened door letting in warm out side air.

Thats the stuff. I recomend several coats the first time to insure complete coverage. Another product that does well are Empire products. They were the original makers of TopCote.

You want to be very careful with products that have non stick lubricants in them such as silicone and or possibly Teflon. If this products gets on your wood project and is undetected it can cause a lot of head aches with finishes. Remember, nothing sticks to Teflon, including your finish.

The hard part.
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