Straight Edge

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Hi,
I plan on building built in bookcases for my new home. I plan on using a veneer type plywood available in 4' by 8' sheets. The bookshelves will be 72" in height.
What is the preferred method to make the long cuts? I was thinking a skill saw for the rough cut then finding an 8 foot straight edge and cleaning the edge up with a router.
Anyone have an idea on who makes a ONE PIECE 8 foot straight edge?
Thanks,
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There are 8-ft levels out there. reasonably priced, too. Hard to find a straighter edge than that.
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wrote:

Not really. Levels are a bit concave to bias them towards resting out at the ends.
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wrote:

??? Are you saying that levels are hourglass shaped? All I can say is that I've NEVER seen one like that and would throw it out if I did.. I'd also say that since most modern 8' levels are made from aluminum extrusions, they are a constant dimension along their length.
-Jack
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wrote:

That's been my experience.
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You should both look closer.
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I think a piece of 8ft angle iron would make a heavy but decent straight edge.
I bought a great straight edge from http://www.eurekazone.org/ this is not a single piece but is the best two piece straight edge I have seen. They also have a sled for accurate placement of the circular saw.
I have used the rough cut with a circular saw and clean up with a straight edge and router for long lengths and have been very happy with the result.
Dave Paine.

the
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"Wanker" writes:

the
That works for me.

Get an aluminum angle, 2"x2"x1/8"x96" and a couple of 3", C-Clamps.
Works for me, less than $20 USD, complete.
HTH
Lew
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Lew Hodgett responds:

Works great. Add a really good blade and you can often forget about clean-up.
Charlie Self "Inanimate objects are classified scientifically into three major categories - those that don't work, those that break down and those that get lost." Russell Baker
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Thanks all! I think the angle iron is for me!
Wanker

skill
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On Mon, 09 Aug 2004 21:57:05 -0400, Wanker wrote:

Good luck. With my CS, the motor comes close to the foot for shallow cuts. Angle iron is too tall. YMMV.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"


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It does come in different sizes.

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I cheated. I got a 10' metal stud at the lumber yard. I think it was a whopping $2.79. clamps at each end, *and* some 'brace' strips against the back of it, clamped down at the back of the stock, to keep it from flexing. and 'awaaaaaaay we go!'. works like a charm.
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Robert Bonomi states:

For maybe six bucks, would 2 of those things work if you tack welded one on top of the other about every 6-8"? No flex to deal with then, not much thicker, twice as heavy, but IIRC, they are pretty light anyway?
Charlie Self "Inanimate objects are classified scientifically into three major categories - those that don't work, those that break down and those that get lost." Russell Baker
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I dunno. I don't have welding capability. <grin>
They're available with the metal in several thicknesses, but even the 'heavy' ones are still very light as far as total mass goes.
I suspect one could stiffen things considerably by using a two (or more) 'in parallel', i.e. in a 'UU', or 'UUU' arrangement.
As long as the stud is straight to start with, it clamps down straight. and there is 'merely' the matter of dealing with any flexing that might occur from side-stresses while making the cut. I tend to have an abundance of scraps in the sub 4' range, that are well-suited for use as temporary cross-bracing.
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wrote:

Cut a 3 or 4" strip from the other side of your ply or a cheaper ply and use that to reference your cuts.
Clif
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I was wondering when the simplest solution would surface.. ;~) I was just getting ready to post the same.
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Any S4S (surfaced 4 sides) lumber you buy will be straight enough to make a fence for your circular saw and use it for this cut. No need to rout. Rig the setup on a scrap piece to determine the distance from the blade to the fence and be sure to consider which side of the blade kerf you're measuring from. Put 4 2x4's on your horses and set it up so that there is a 2x very close to each side of the blade and the other 2 are supporting the far sides. Clamp your "fence" and rip away.

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I would love to know where you buy your straight s4s lumber.
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Ok, let me rephrase. Any STRAIGHT s4s lumber will work. Though I didn't specify in my original post, you may want to inspect it before you buy; just like your wife.
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