Storm-downed weeping willow - worth scrounging?

Greetings, Couple branches of the neighbor's weeping willow came down in a storm. Tree folk say they need to take down the whole tree for safety's sake. I look at lots of board feet of lumber on the hoof and wonder if it's worth asking for some.
I understand that willow isn't very strong; I'd be carving it. (Kachinas are carved from downed willow, BTW.) The Forest Products Lab book only mentions Black Willow. The site http://www.wood-worker.com/properties.htm doesn't mention willow at all.
Has anyone here played with weeping willow wood?
--
"Keep your ass behind you"


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Yep. It's soft, fuzzy, and weak like the entire family. As long as you confine its use to such things where those are insignificant, it's pretty.
Would I pay more for cutting than the price of its brothers of the aspen/cottonwood persuasion? Probably not much.
Kachinas are of cottonwood/willow, because that's about all that grows in those river bottoms.

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On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 08:00:06 -0400, George wrote:

Yah. I had my stupid hat on when I wrote that. Brain thought, "big tree, grows by river." It forgot that it was located in WI, not AZ, at the time it told my fingers what to type.
--
"Keep your ass behind you"


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Australopithecus scobis wrote:

Some how I sort of doubt that. Probably more like Cotton wood. Most of the Willows in the South West are Globe willow, not weeping willow and those have been brought in by eastern "carpet baggers". :-) ...lew...
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On Wed, 01 Sep 2004 13:32:00 GMT, Lewis Hartswick

According to one of my (UK) tree-spotting books, all the true "weeping" willows are Salix alba v. Tristis. These are male clones, grown from a single specimen in France at the start of the 19th century.
There are of course other willows of rather similar shape.
--
Smert' spamionam

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I am a Kachina collector and yes they are carved from Cottonwood, mostly Cottonwood roots or atleast very low on the stump.
Fred
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