Storage solutions?

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Unfortunately, I find it necessary to pack up/store the majority of my shop tools.
The "big iron" items are pretty well taken care of (Thanks again, Leon!!!!), but it is the successful, relatively long term (year or two) storage of the smaller, boxed items, like router bits, metal hand tools, squares, planes, blades, chisels, etc. that I'm interested in.
Besides the usual desiccants, etc ... has anyone had any _firsthand_ experience/success with the impregnated rust/corrosion inhibitors in a form that you can use in boxes to alleviate rusting, similar to these?:
http://www.leevalley.com/wood/page.aspx?c=3&pY367&catQ&ap=3
How well did they work? How much do you need? Is there something, or a combination of methods, that works better? Do they work better in airtight containers? What you would have done different, etc ...
I figure some of you guys who went through Katrina/Rita on the Gulf Coast may have "BTDT", so thanks in advance for any _firsthand_ experience in long term (one to two year) storing of items like these.
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Last update: 8/18/08
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"Swingman" wrote

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Why not just dip them in motor oil and put them in plastic zip-top bags? As long as the bags are in a box or something so that friction won't let the bits cut through the bags...
Or buy some of that rubbery goo they coat new router bits with, if you can find it.
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DJ Delorie wrote:

Cosmoline http://www.mil-specproducts.com/cosmo_l.aspx?gclid=CKHprZeV9ZUCFQpxHgoddxL_iA and VCI wrap http://www.uline.com/BL_5250/VCI-Anti-Rust-Paper?pricode=WO442 is the "traditional" way to do it.
The paper's got enough body that a few wraps should keep cutting edges on router bits and the like separated.
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"Swingman" wrote:

Contct a bit manufacturer or a saw sharpening service and find out what they use for the soft plastic protective coating.
My sharpening service has a dip tank.
Maybe you could contract with a local source to dip your stuff.
Lew
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http://www.lpslabs.com/product_pg/corrosion_pg/LPS3.html
They also make LPS4, but it's a lot more work to remove.
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Nothing specifically on the direct question, sorry, but I had similar thoughts as have already been posited.
I'd only remind the obvious that the storage environment would make a huge difference if at all possible to get at least minimal climate control would be good...(maybe could rent bomb bay space in one of the stored relics of the Air Force in AZ? :) )
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A number of years ago, I was engaged in a study to determine what prevented corrosion on the tops of table saws most effectively for shipping and storage. So I partnered with a supplier of vapor paper and sent about 25 samples to the humidity chamber. Various combinations of solutions, greases, mikelman coated corrugated, wood (to test its propensity to work through the other stuff and corrode, i.e. pallets stacked several high) and vapor paper.
As it turned out, vapor paper by itself worked the best. We continued to put a light grease, but only to hold the paper on while packing off the unit.
It works by emmitting a vapor as opposed to collecting the water from the air or providing a barrier. I'm not sure where you can get it, it was a wholesale item for us.
So I packed off my "special Unisaw" with paper on the top and paper wadded up in the body of the saw. It was doing fine in a very humid climate, however, I can attest to the fact that it did not stand up to being submerged in seven feet of brackish water and then not tended to for several weeks after Katrina.
Frank
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"Frank Boettcher" wrote

Lesson learned ... the hard way. Thanks for the first hand experience, hard to come by, apparently even when specifically requested.

Feel your pain, but I hope it doesn't come to that!
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Easiest of all..........send them to me and I'll take care of them<big grin>

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MANY years ago when working along the coast, we had a simple solution for rust problems with small items. Before we knew it as being a piss poor joke on homeowners, we used Water Displacement Formula 40 for its intended purpose.
For those not familiar with the Gulf coast area, there are weeks where it will rain EVERY day... at least a little... and then still curse you with high humidity. Your high carbon tools will actually get a fine coat of rust in a few hours there.
An open truck tool box (helpers), or the tools strung out on the job when you get a quick shower made our tools rust like hell.
We started to wrap up our tools in towels we swiped from the hotels we stayed in that were well sprayed with WD 40. In those towels, they could be rained on and not rust. So we started putting any tools we weren't using in the towels, giving them a quick spritz, and putting them in the tool box.
Then we started to spray the open boxes of nails, and that killed the rust problem on those as well.
FWIW, I had a bunch of hand tools (chisels, squares, dull drill bits that I have intended to sharpen for several years, etc.) that were older, less sturdy, and not "favorites" of mine that I put in a large truck tool box that I pulled off an old work truck. I did the same wrap, and just opened the box and sprayed the towels every six months or so and never had a spot of rust. They stayed in there for about 4 years until I sold the box and most of the stuff in it. Others have done this as well with great success. It seems the key to though, it to make sure you put the items and towels/rags in a container that is pretty well sealed to keep the WD40 from flashing off.
Our average humidity is not so far off Houston as you might think. Our average morning humidity is 83%.
Just a low tech answer. I have no experience with those emitter gizmos. As always, YMMV.
Hope you don't have the tools put up long.
Robert
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Swingman wrote:

Cosmoline?
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dadiOH
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wrote:

I think that is off the market.
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Cosmolene is very definitely available.
Very effective, just messy clean up.
Lew
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On Wed, 24 Sep 2008 19:38:26 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

Can you point to a source where I can buy some?
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote: ...

google is your friend...if you're not just looking for an argument :(
http://www.schafco.com/cosmoline.asp http://www.mil-specproducts.com/cosmo_l.aspx?gclid=CKKd7IaJ95UCFRfAQAodrGNW4Q
Since now it is a class that matches a Mil-Spec (whose number I don't recall), there are a variety of products that can qualify as well as the original...
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Thanks. I wasn't looking for an argument. I was under the impression that it was taken off the market. I'm not sure any of these is the traditional cosmolene of years ago, but the "weathershed" sounds like at least a modern replacement for it.
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google Cosmolene
I found several
Lew
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On Thu, 25 Sep 2008 15:26:34 GMT, "Lew Hodgett"

Really? I just tried Google. Found many discussions about how to remove it, and some dead links to places that USED to have it.
I think my original belief was correct. The cosmolene name still exists,and they have new products with that familiar name on them, but the stuff they used many years ago, that was called cosmolene, was taken off the market because it contained carcinogens.
I also think, after seeing many of those google results, that many people call any rustproof coating "cosmolene", regardless of what it really is.
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snipped-for-privacy@dog.com wrote:

It would undoubtedly help if you spelled it correctly. Anything that meets the Mil-Spec that described the WW-II stuff is close enough.
As I suspected, you're just itchin' as typical... :(
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