Storage shed questions

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The weather here is brutal in the winter. I doubt the bikes would last a year outside. Besides, the association police would start sending me nastygrams.
brian
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wrote:

I gues then I would think of the shed as more a "bike garage" with room for storing other things rather than a shed in which bikes can be put. If all the bikes have a real place where they belong and it's easier to get them in it than find a place in the garage to leave em then you've at least got a chance of them ending up there at the end of the day. Otherwise it's just going to be space that gets filled up and you'll be right back where you are now.
God help you when they start driving :)
-Leuf
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The oldest one gets a learner's permit next year. We've already joked about paving the front yard to turn it into a parking lot.
brian
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Then just go to BJ's or Sam's Club or some such place and get one of their pre-built sheds delivered. The Cedar shed on a pallet that someone else mentioned is a nicer looking alternative, but if wheeling something in and putting a skirt around it is too much trouble for you now then you'll probably never go through the trouble of disassembling the nice looking cedar shed later. Therefore since you must buy something then buy something that you won't be sorry to leave behind.
J.
brianlanning wrote:

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When I was a kid, my dad had an ice fishing shack that he made in a weekend out of 1/2" plywood. Rather than making it as a permenent structure that would take up space year-round, he screwed 2" x 2" studs around the perimeter of each sheet of ply on the inside, and 1"x stock around the outside perimeter of each sheet to look like trim. Then, the whole deal was nailed together with a few duplex nails, while we drilled holes through the studs for carriage bolts to hold the thing together. The base was sort of like a pallet with skis on either side and a piece of plywood with a trapdoor for a floor- the walls attached to it with the same carriage bolts and wing nuts used in the whole thing. The roof was the same as the walls, with a little slant to it to let the snow slide off and some shingles (or maybe plastic, I forget which). Anyhow, the thing would disassemble pretty easily and the peices fit right on top of the base for transport out to the lake, or from one lake to another. It held up to some fairly ferocious winds and rough weather conditions, and he's still got the thing- though it is now being used as a shed in the backyard.
Last fall, we used a similar method for building a foundation form at work (with stouter lumber and cross bracing), and it worked well for that also. We took the form peices back to the shop after the pour, and they're still good for at least a couple more uses.
After everything is said and done- it's a shed. I'd lay some pallets on the yard (or set a couple of posts and leave the ground bare), put some plywood or hardboard over them, and build on that platform with standard sized sheets of plywood or chipboard with a timber frame around the perimeter of each sheet to bolt the sucker together. It's quick and easy, can be painted however you like, as big as you want it to be (within reasonable limits- I wouldn't make it bigger than 8' x 16', myself) and can be partially disassembled for moving, or totally disassembled to use the wood for something else later. Obviously, it's not the preferred method for building a nice little permenent shed, but it'd work nicely for a temporary outbuilding, and can be done for under $500 in a day or two.
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brianlanning wrote:

I had a similar situation when I lived at the trailer park. I needed a substantial shed for secure storage. I built a nice sturdy full-height shed, 10x10 at the base and 12x12 at the eaves. I never gave a thought as to what I would do when I moved. Well, when I did get ready to move, I was able to hire someone to move it for me. I just looked in the phone book under house movers. I was able to hire a guy to move my big shed 250 miles to my new location, no problem. For someone who is used to moving houses, a shed is a non-event.
So if 4x8 is big enough for you then you should be able to buy or build anything you want. You could even look for a mover in advance. I think you should build or buy an extra sturdy shed that will stand up to being towed at highway speed. I lost a few shingles on mine but was otherwise was very happy and surprised at how easy it was to have a rather large shed moved.
Lawrence
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In my area, if you have a shed on skids . . . any tilt-back wrecker company will move it for you at the same rate as towing a car . . . One guy here says he would rather move an eight by ten shed than a full size pick-up . . . Basically a dollar a mile . . . . I would line up a wrecker/mover and build with the intent for it to fit on a tilt-back wrecker . . . this way you are not limited to one hauler down the road . . . . My brother builds large iron gates and has them moved this way . . . . he has a large wooden skid, builds the gate on it, then calls the wrecker . . . cheaper than a trucking company & most of these guys are independents and price is very negotiable . . .
Steve

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