Storage Shed

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How about a hammered dulcimer?

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GarageWoodworks wrote:

I went to your site and I'm impressed.... and jealous of your table saw.
I'd say it's like Lionel Hampton asking for sheet music to play chopsticks.
That's supposed to be a compliment, but we can agree to disagree.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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I could probably make one without plans. It would look normal from the outside and would stand the test of time. However, when you went inside it would probably look like nothing you'd ever seen. I want to be conventional here. And thanks for the compliment!
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wrote:

Now THAT almost got a snort of tea out of my nose.
Actually, putting together a shed economically does require some planning and knowledge or appropriate materials. When I thought I could make some money a few years ago by building on site sheds and shops (I couldn't) I went with a guy that subcontracted the building of the sheds from the vendor.
His plans were so well thought out, he could put an entire shed together including hanging doors, windows, and installing the roof in a day with a helper. His average shed (their best seller) was an 8X10, and at the end of the job he had less than a wheelbarrow of scrap left. To me, that was a thing of beauty.
He built sheds and stand alone rooms built like these:
http://www.thecountrytree.com /
Just out of curiosity, I Googled "lawn shed plans" and a ton of sites came up with plans and pictures of the finished products.
Robert
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wrote:

Yep I googled too. Probably a lot of crap plans out there. That's why in my original post I requested info on plans that were "tried".
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"His average shed (their best seller) was an 8X10, and at the end of the job he had less than a wheelbarrow of scrap left. To me, that was a thing of beauty. "
There is a bit of conceit displayed by the fellow who saw no difference nor difficulty between the talents and experience required of a Malloof and an experienced Rough Carpenter and presumed a seamless from the one to the other.
I did appreciate the musical references, however - Pianos, Marimbas and Tubas!
The OP wasn't much help.
He needs to look outside Lowes/Home Depot (or equivalents) to see the ready to install sheds they offer and the several plan books displayed on their respective magazine racks inside and maybe Google for "FREE SHED PLANS," before coming to us for "advice."
As one here politely put it "Function, fellow? Form follows and advice may follow that."
In my explorations of the subject over the years I have learned many tricks of the Shed building trade, well, stumbled upon most - well, erred into many. One I recall liking was to anticipate the finished wall sections and apply the sheathing before raising each section - allowing the sheating on the one section to over lap the studs sufficiently to cover the edge of the flush-sided wall section to which it was (to be) attached.
Framing for a cupola w/o plans was an interesting project on one shed as was a "pole barn" approach taken on another only to switch approaches mid-shed and pour concrete and build stud walls.
I've never built to a set of plans, now that I think of it. It seems that my projects are materials driven - at least initially. I have a surplus of tongue and groove 2 x 6" PT (got for ten bucks from HD one day) and wound up with a 6 ft x 8 ft vinyl-sided, shingle-roofed, three window, shed with electric (inside and out) and a steel 3-0 front door with a semi-circle lite and a front "stoop!"
I build with the techniques I know and they are not always most appropriate to the task(s) at hand.
I replaced the front pads on the girl friend's Toyota with great difficulty on the left side and none when attacking the other wheel.
The difference? It was lunch time and a friend and professional mechanic stopped by and asked "Why aren't you removing that first?"
He, you see, was privy to the Toyota repair manuals - I was not.
A real Furniture Maker is not afraid to ask questions.
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Hoosierpopi wrote:

I'm not certain, from that statement, which side you're taking. :-)

That's a trick borrowed from the house building trade. You can put the windows in while it's flat on the deck, too, if your windows have those neat nailing flaps all around the perimeter.

Did he ask you how to take the wheel off? :-p
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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"There is a bit of conceit displayed by the fellow who saw no difference nor difficulty between the talents and experience required of a Maloof and an experienced Rough Carpenter and presumed a seamless [transition] from the one (application/task) to the other."
I would argue that a furniture maker is no more an expert rough carpenter by default than is a rough carpenter unable to craft fine pieces of furniture as a matter of fact.
I would argue, and thought I had, that there are tricks and abilities honed at either edge of the spectrum that may well advantage each individual as he performs his primary task over the other performing that same task/project for the first time.
I would argue that it is not becoming (conceited?) for either Rough Carpenter or Furniture Maker to proclaim the other avocation an easy transition and that either is actually likely to seek the advice of the other upon deciding to attempt same.
HP
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Hoosierpopi wrote:

I wouldn't "argue" against anything you wrote.
Having enough experience in both to make a completely subjective assessment in the matter, void of any emotionally biased judgment that might imply conceit or arrogance, I simply contend that building a storage shed takes far less skill, acquired knowledge, and overall brainpower than building fine furniture.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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Holy crap, look what we have here. It's the great hypercritic of newsgroups.

The level of arrogance you display by claiming to know what I did before posting here is stupendous.
I specifically requested info from anyone with experience with any shed plans that they have "tried". Do you have a reading comprehension problem?

Where is your advice that addresses my post? What plans have you tried? Where are your CAD drawings? <snip of rambling>
All of that and you never addressed my post. Have tried any shed plans? Where are your CAD drawings?

This seems to fly in the face of your above commentary.
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wrote:

That isn't the first time he has run his mouth without his brain attached.

He absolutely does. He has proven this repeatedly.

Heh, heh. Alright, calm down. Hoosier is not only an idiot, but a first class moron. He cannot read for comprehension because he doesn't know how.
He quoted ME on the "thing of beauty". Yet in his abject stupidity, the little voices in his damaged brain told him that I compared my shed guy to Malloof [sic]. Not only did I NOT compare my shed guy to <anyone at all>, especially not someone named Malloof. I am wondering if he is showing of his stupidity once again, misspelling Sam Maloof's name. If so, I got it! You are an idiot HP! I guess we should be lucky he go close, because if he had put Kruschev, I would have never guessed Krenov.
For crying out loud, he flat out makes things up which can easily be proven wrong by reading up a couple of posts. But in his idiotic pontificating, once he gets started he can't even make a valid point of comparison since he doesn't know the name of the people he is comparing. And of all the people to compare someone to; I defy anyone here to find me anything snobbish, rude or judgmental Sam Maloof has said about a fellow craftsman, or anyone else for that matter. SM is the antithesis of the high toned, pseudo intellectual eccentric that many craftsman hold as their own image.
Jeezus... I would think that if you are going to fabricate something to sell as a valid comparison, you would at least find someone to misquote or lie about that will make your point a little better.
GW, he had this same attack of know it all diarrhea a month of so ago when I posted comments about my first hands on look at a Saw Stop saw. Totally missed the boat on the post, probably didn't read it because it had too many big words, made stupid things up as comments, but was really proud of himself for his own lack of reading comprehension. Someway, his brain seems to fill in a lot of the blank spots in his ability to comprehend the written word.
And BTW, I would not be embarrassed or wrong headed to compare my shed building buddy to any craftsman. He has no elitist air about him, nor any conceit. I like that. Building sheds is not all he does; but he is so good at it he does it whenever he needs fill work. He is enormously talented, but will do anything to feed his family.
I will always appreciate a well practiced, sure hand on the tools no matter the task. I like the fact that his day in and day out accuracy is so good that they don't order one stick more of material than they need to. I admire the fact that he turns out a great product with no snobbery as to what project is paying the bills for his family. His level of craftsmanship is no less tedious than when he is building a cabinet.
So I wonder; what does that make me if I admire a man for his own personal set of standards for workmanship that are far beyond the people he works for?
What does that make me if he doesn't compromise his own personal integrity or dedication to the task, no matter the task be it a kitchen full of cabinets or shed?
How should I think of myself when I look at his finished project and think "man.. that really came out nice! Pretty damn tight work for a shed!".
Conceited, I guess.
Strange too, to me. In 35 years in the trades, the very talented, the best of the best at what they do are the most humble. They are usually the type that will ask about ANYTHING the don't know. Someone called it learning... after all, you can't know everything.
I think of it as appreciating the skills of others. They ask questions without fear of without guile. They are so high above their chosen trade that they take their skills for granted.
Yet, even at their high level at doing <what ever> it is they do (transmission mechanic, woodturner, boat builder, etc.), they want to get better. They ask questions. They are not afraid to learn from others.
Reading HP's posts really tell a lot about what a tiny, petty little man he is in life. Sad, really.
But I do wish he would learn to read. OK, and comprehend. Oh yeah, one more thing; not to put words in the mouths of other people.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Robert, you are sometimes (actually, most of the time) a joy to read. Whether it's walking a newbie through finishing or tossing out a few nuggets on whatever topic strikes your fancy, I always take the time to sit down and digest whatever it is you have to say.
I'm not sure if you're better when you're pissed off or not; probably not, but the extra passion sure gives your post a bit of a 'zing'.
Don't stop posting.
Tanus
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Well Hell yeah! he's a Texan.
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"Leon" wrote:

There is no cure for that is there?
Lew
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Absolutely not! I have tried to drown it out with brisket and bourbon, sausage and beer, even a good cigar and margarita. No luck yet. Maybe I have to hit those ingredients a little harder...
But alas... I think it must be something in the water around here! These were made by my fellow Texans. Absolutely NO ONE enjoys ribbing a Texan like a fellow Texan. Take a these are one minute each, and I promise you will groan.
Fellow Texans will laugh their asses off! The stereotypes are too funny!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apMyjOAacyA


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lIiZfpQQkPA&feature=related

Robert
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You are on the right track, keep work'in at it.

Water?
You got water in Texas.
I thought all you had were long necks.

BUD LIGHT!!! Yea Gads, tell me it's not true.

Lew
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> BUD LIGHT!!! Yea Gads, tell me it's not true.
Figures.
Luigi
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I am nothing if not a determined cuss. I won't give up the fight. Thanks for the encouragement! I could call my Labor Day brisket Lew in your honor if you like... ;^)

Well hell, yeah. Where do you think we go when we go fishin'? Everyone knows you pack your huntin' rifle and go fishin' down at the river.
I know, I know. We all know you can't shoot fish at the coast, though. You have to have a license for that.

All stuff worth drinking comes in long necks. For the last two years I have been enjoying a torrid love affair with the Shiner Bohemian Style Black Lager, and the Shiner Smokehouse summer beer. I am drinking more Smokehouse on the weekends as it goes great with any kind of food.
But the Black Lager is like a singing siren's song to me. I am glad it became so popular (it is a 100+ year old recipe) that they now make it year round, and have dropped the price to boot.
I loved that dark stuff, but I had never had "raushbier" or smoked beer. The website says they smoke the hops over native mesquite (*gulp* brings a tear to my eye to see that) until they are full of smoke and then they make the beer.
Too strong for most, but if you are a bbq fan like me, it really hits the spot. Still, the Black Lager has me by the shorties, and it is the first beer in a long time I can honestly say I enjoy drinking.

Nah.... you were just supposed to see the tribute to the folks here and enjoy the razzing. I honestly don't know anyone that drinks BL as the heavier beers seem to be more favored here.
But everyone I know loved those commercials.
Robert
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in your honor if you like... ;^)
Why knot?

river.
Mental picture of the Rio Grande in late August comes to mind.

I have been enjoying a torrid love affair with the Shiner Bohemian Style Black Lager, and the Shiner Smokehouse summer beer. I am drinking more Smokehouse on the weekends as it goes great with any kind of food.
But the Black Lager is like a singing siren's song to me. I am glad it became so popular (it is a 100+ year old recipe) that they now make it year round, and have dropped the price to boot.
I loved that dark stuff, but I had never had "raushbier" or smoked beer. The website says they smoke the hops over native mesquite (*gulp* brings a tear to my eye to see that) until they are full of smoke and then they make the beer.
Too strong for most, but if you are a bbq fan like me, it really hits the spot. Still, the Black Lager has me by the shorties, and it is the first beer in a long time I can honestly say I enjoy drinking.
Sounds like an experience worth having.

and enjoy the razzing. I honestly don't know anyone that drinks BL as the heavier beers seem to be more favored here.
BUD LIGHT, Millers, Coors, etc.
Products of a discontented horse.
Lew
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Well said; Shiner's Black Lager is a definite work of art. Love it!
--
"Our beer goes through thousands of quality Czechs every day."
(From a Shiner Bock billboard I saw in Austin some years ago)
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