Stones

I've got a small problem with sharpening stones. My dad died last year and left me his stones. I have a double sided stone that's extremely rough, a couple of diamond hone blocks (180, 260 & 360 grit) that look like they came from HF, a double sided white and blue and a stone reading "Franz Swaty." All of them are loaded and have extremely shiny surfaces. Is there a way to clean and/or save these stones? What's the proper way to use them..oil, water or dry? I've got a number of carving tools, planes and power tools I'd like to sharpen but don't have any idea if these stones will work or are worth the effort. R. Wink
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Personally, I use WD 40 to clean my stones. I am sure many opinions will come of this. One thing though, you will want to find your flatest most perfect stone that you have and square your finer stones. Constant sharpening will cause a "gully" in your stone. When sharpening I will also use WD 40. Hope this helps you it id what I do and have never had a problem.
Searcher1

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wrote:

Odd, I use soap and a washcloth to clean mine.
Oh, wait. Never mind.
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Also, below (previously) in this NG search for the header: "flattening Shapton stones - any alternatives to the Shapton plates?" You'll see some good suggestions for flattening stones, which I intend to try.
I think wd-40 is too thin, never done it, but saw someone else do it and the stuff soaks right in when some should remain on top, to be effective. He kept on putting it in frequently as I watched.
Point being is, the oil prevents the stones from clogging the way you found yours and creates "slippage". I suggest as cheaper source that will be effective, 3-in1 oil. You can get large sizes of it cheaply at places like home depot or orchard supply hardware.
Alex
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AAvK wrote:

I'd suggest cleaning the stones by scrubbing with detergent and a brush. I'd use a light oil like sewing machine oil or camellia oil to lube them. 3-in-1 works well too, but I have a source of sewing machine oil that's cheaper than 3-in-1. (SWMBO is a mega-serious sewer and quilter with 'ins' and discounts at a lot of the local shops.) The diamond stones can be used with water as well.
--RC
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I have done that and it work pretty good, then I read to soak an old stone in kerosene, right on the carborundum box, doing that currently.
I'd use a light oil like sewing machine oil or camellia

[snip]
That is a good thought, does it work well? Is it thick enough?
Alex
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AAvK wrote:

Sewing machine oil is thick enough without being too thick. I suppose if I was doing things like putting edges on beat-up machetes, I might prefer something like 30 weight motor oil, but most of what I'm doing is honing and light edge renewal. I have used sewing machine oil for flattening the bottom of planes, however and it worked well.
--RC

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Really? That is what I am doing now with a stanley #4 type 19, on sand paper which is on thick glass, super 77 and dry with no oil, but what is your media, a tool or the same as what I'm doing?
This plane was used a lot for a long time but it was never tuned, the factory grinding marks are still on the sole and still a lot of hills and valleys. Wanna get it real smooth.
Alex
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AAvK wrote:

For flattening I use a sheet of plate glass with wet or dry sandpaper lubricated with sewing machine oil. The lubricant keeps the paper from loading up so quickly and makes it last longer. I've also found it pays to go to an auto supply store and get high-quality sandpaper.
I also use the same setup for sharpening plane blades, woodworking chisels and similar tools. (My woodcarving chisels get a different treatment, in part because they have a different profile.)
--RC

In my experience, just flattening the sole of a plane makes a huge difference in how well it works.
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snipped-for-privacy@mindspring.com says...

I've had pretty good luck with mineral oil from the discount grocery - seems to be about the right consistency not to fly off the stone.
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wrote:

kitchen cleanser (I like barkeeper's friend) and a green scotchbrite pad will clean them pretty well.
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On Sun, 03 Oct 2004 00:31:03 +0000, R.Wink wrote:

To clean the stones, soak them in mineral spirits in an old electric fry pan. Bring it to a simmer (out of doors preferred) and let it stay that way for fifteen minutes to half an hour. Allow them to cool in the pan, soaking up the oil / mineral spirits blend as they cool. Take them out and wipe them off with a rag. If any metal still sticks to them, pick it off with a scribe tip. Now, soak them with whatever oil you intend to use for cutting to refill their inner pores and rub them together to flatten them. Obviously the diamond whet stones and any round stones do not get this treatment ... in is only for bench stones.
Apply a few squirts of oil each time you sharpen something on them so that the pores are full of oil and not shavings.
Bill
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