Stickley's Fuming?

I am looking to finish a piece made from red oak. I would like to use the Stickley finishing techniques minus the fuming. I was watching Norm this weekend and he said something about using the stain mixed with alcohol.
Does anybody have the recipe and/or technique? Yes, I did look at google and came up with different fuming techniques using ammonia but I was looking for the same type of look without that long process.
Thanks.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Try this link
http://www.homesteadfinishing.com/mission_oak.htm

and
for
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
brought forth from the murky depths:

It takes longer with the above mentioned method of stain, glaze, and then finishing. Fume it overnight and put the finish on the next day. What's long about that?
--
Impeach 'em ALL!
----------------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I agree with you, but Jack was asking for the formula to do it with stain.
Maybe Jack is not comfortable dealing with ammonia.
I have read that fuming red oak will give a green cast to the wood. I have never fumed anything, so I don't know.
I will be fuming some quarter sawn white oak in the future though. It is my intention to look for liquid ammonia used in blue line machines. It used to be available from blueprint supply houses.
:-)

the
this
google
looking
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Lowell Holmes wrote:

I only tried fuming one time (on a test piece of white oak) and it turned out looking like treated lumber; a yucky green color. I've read that fuming in colder weather can cause this, and warm (or hot) temperatures are required to get the chocolate brown hues. Can anyone confirm or deny this?
--
To reply, change the chemical designation to its common name.


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Yes that's true. However some orange shellac will negate the green color. Here's more than you probably want to know: http://musial.ws/fuming.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Wed, 11 Feb 2004 14:57:35 GMT, Steve Turner

I haven't fumed yet, but the guys who have say the look before the finish goes on is horrible. The finish deepens it to the warm, brown tones. Did you put varnish on the fumed piece, or just give up on it.

No idea.
--
Impeach 'em ALL!
----------------------------------------------------
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Larry Jaques wrote:

Yeah, I tried a few coats of garnet shellac, but I wasn't impressed with the results. I haven't given up yet, I just haven't used White Oak for anything since that test. I'm sure I'll experiment with it again sometime soon.
--
To reply, change the chemical designation to its common name.


Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

my
to
It's not so much as being comfortable as seeing how easy Norm made it out to seem without even using the fuming technique. It "wood" appear that he ended up with the same result.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Fuming red oak usually leads to a bit of a greenish tint.
--
Think thrice, measure twice and cut once.

Sanding is like paying taxes ... everyone has to do it, but it is
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

the
this
google
looking
What I had found on the net was about an eight step process. Starting with rubbing the piece down with denatured alcohol to raise the grain. Then hit it with 250 grit. Fume it. sand it. stain it...and a few more I can't remember off the top of my head. Ending with 0000 steel wool wax/buff.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've fumed a number of things out of White Oak, Red Oak, Cherry and Walnut (with more experimentation to come). My process after finish sanding is to fume it, Knock back the little fuzzies that do seem to rise (320 grit), and then oil & varnish it. As Larry said, it looks pretty disappointing when you first pull it out of the fumes - all dark, gray and "Whahappentomypiece!" Once you hit it with the oil it gorgifies. (And yes, I've also had Red Oak turn greenish, but some garnet shellac will counter it.)
--
Owen Lowe and his Fly-by-Night Copper Company
Offering a shim for the Porter-Cable 557 type 2 fence design.
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Just about any proprietary walnut stain will do or even asphaltum would also do it [Asphaltum has no red tint in it].....mj

and
for
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Stickley's Fuming"????
Was his temper legendary? ;^)
--- Gregg
My woodworking projects:
Replicas of 15th-19th century nautical navigational instruments:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/backstaffhome.html
Restoration of my 82 year old Herreshoff S-Boat sailboat:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/SBOATrestore.htm
Steambending FAQ with photos:
http://home.comcast.net/~saville/Steambend.htm
"Improvise, adapt, overcome." snipped-for-privacy@head-cfa.harvard.edu Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Phone: (617) 496-1558
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I recall reading some lit about how to do it and it called for a special type of ammonia. I asked my local paint-guy about getting some and got nothing but strange looks back.
What type of ammonia are you supposed to use?
Expiring minds want to know. jb
wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Red oak turns a sort of green when it is fumed. Stickley used white oak. White oak turns a nice medium brown when fumed YMMV.
Grant
Jack Kerouac wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.