Stickley reproduction with a few twists

Here are two pics of a recently finished project
http://www.sonomaproducts.com/images/stories/custom/gallery/custom211.jpg
http://www.sonomaproducts.com/images/stories/custom/gallery/custom222.jpg
This is a Stickley #601 Tabouret reproduction. 1. I used a wild-edge/cracked and distressed top 2. Done in Cherry vs traditional White Oak 3. Oil finish with minor wipe on of satin poly on the top 4. I will kill the sheen a bit when I wax it but I am waiting for it to dry and it is already sold and I need to deliver it soon so I took pictures today.
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Beautiful. Really like the use of natural wood elements in the piece. Well done.
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I like it, too. Good job.
Sonny
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On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 1:01:31 AM UTC-5, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

RonB
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On Tue, 9 Oct 2012 23:01:30 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

That top is tops!
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On Tuesday, October 9, 2012 11:01:31 PM UTC-7, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

I meant to mention that I put butterfly inlays across the crack on the underside at each end so it won't break off over time.
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In considering "naturally designed" pieces of wood for any use, keep in mind: Hardly any natural pieces (of anything, actually) are straight or have straight lines or edges, like milled lumber. I think, about the only straight lines or edges, in nature, is in or with rock, ice or similar crystals.
Try to coordinate your project's design with the offering from nature. Often times, with little effort, things just turn out great.... and, of course, each natural piece is unique, to boot!
Sonny
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On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 1:02:58 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Sonny, I am not quite sure why your posts always seem to me to be a bit on off on some meandering tangent. May I ask; do you often or have ever smoked a lot of weed???
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Nope, LOL. Never smoked or did any drugs, except perscription ones. I suppose my meanderdering thoughts are the result of my upbringing and formal schooling.
I grew up on a farm. I think that's been a plus. Sometime in grade school or high school, I realized the art of and in nature. My first major in college was Wildlife Biology and spent many hours/days in the woods, studying whatever. When I graduated WB, the only job available was working in a fish hatchery for $300/mo. I went back to school in engineering, Basic Design Technology, and subsequently worked at Placid Refinery, in Port Allen, La. for 2 years, then had the opportunity to get into the medical field (following my brother), where I spent 23 yrs before retiring. I now have lots of time to reflect on lots of things, especially my woods wanderings and the like, as when younger.
Whether my rationale is on track or not, I simply enjoy thinking and trying to perform tasks in various genre, disciplines or combinations of. When a subject strikes me a certain way, I express my opinion, to show my thoughts and why.
I think, in a nut shell, I've always been passionate about nature and what it has to offer, including its art. I guess I was explaining, from a different perspective, why I liked your project. I, too, sometimes wonder if I'm just off the beaten path or lost in the woods. With many of my projects, I've tried to have as few straight lines or edges as possible, as in nature. When folks see the piece, their first instinct, I find, is they want to touch it, to feel it. I'll bet that's what you've experienced with your table (top): folks want to touch it, not just view it.
Ever look straight up a tall tree. Trees don't "grow" straight up. They grow in a spiral, upwards. Its neat! Nature has lots of "odd things" about itself. It has been and still is enjoyable discovering them.
I suppose, searching for and/or discovering nature's art can be an addiction/addicting. In my retirement years, I find myself having more time to think and do, as in my younger years, just slower doing. My approach or sense, for a project, is more from/for the natural esthetics and art side, rather than from/with the technical aspects of producing the piece. Combining both is a plus. Hardly anyone readily sees the technical aspects, though. Their initial view or perspective is of the art or esthetics, as with your table. I think other comments, here, were in the ball park of my comment. I just pointed out something, specific, I've discovered about most of nature's products... no straight lines or edges... represented, in several ways, in your table project.
Sonny
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On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 9:37:13 PM UTC-7, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

I don't know man. I think somebody is slipping you some magic brownies or something. ;^)
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On 10/11/2012 12:30 AM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

my meanderdering thoughts are the result of my upbringing and formal schooling. I grew up on a farm. I think that's been a plus. Sometime in grade school or high school, I realized the art of and in nature. My first major in college was Wildlife Biology and spent many hours/days in the woods, studying whatever. When I graduated WB, the only job available was working in a fish hatchery for $300/mo. I went back to school in engineering, Basic Design Technology, and subsequently worked at Placid Refinery, in Port Allen, La. for 2 years, then had the opportunity to get into the medical field (following my brother), where I spent 23 yrs before retiring. I now have lots of time to reflect on lots of things, especially my woods wanderings and the like, as when younger. Whether my rationale is on track or not, I simply enjoy thinking and trying to perform tasks in various genre, disciplines or combinations of. When a subject strikes me a certain way, I express my opinion, to show my thoughts and why. I think, in a nut shell, I've always been passionate about nature and what it has to offer, including its art. I guess I was explaining, from a different perspective, why I liked your project. I, too, sometimes wonder if I'm just off the beaten path or lost in the woods. With many of my projects, I've tried to have as few straight lines or edges as possible, as in nature. When folks see the piece, their first instinct, I find, is they want to touch it, to feel it. I'll bet that's what you've experienced with your table (top): folks want to touch it, not just view it. Ever look straight up a tall tree. Trees don't "grow" straight up. They grow in a spiral, upwards. Its neat! Nature has lots of "odd things" about itself. It has been and still is enjoyable discovering them. I suppose, searching for and/or discovering nature's art can be an addiction/addicting. In my retirement years, I find mysel f having more time to think and do, as in my younger years, just slower doing. My approach or sense, for a project, is more from/for the natural esthetics and art side, rather than from/with the technical aspects of producing the piece. Combining both is a plus. Hardly anyone readily sees the technical aspects, though. Their initial view or perspective is of the art or esthetics, as with your table. I think other comments, here, were in the ball park of my comment. I just pointed out something, specific, I've discovered about most of nature's products... no straight lines or edges... represented, in several ways, in your table project. Sonny

It's the mushrooms in that sauce piqaunte, cher.
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Last update: 4/15/2010
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suppose my meanderdering thoughts are the result of my upbringing and formal schooling. I grew up on a farm. I think that's been a plus. Sometime in grade school or high school, I realized the art of and in nature. My first major in college was Wildlife Biology and spent many hours/days in the woods, studying whatever. When I graduated WB, the only job available was working in a fish hatchery for $300/mo. I went back to school in engineering, Basic Design Technology, and subsequently worked at Placid Refinery, in Port Allen, La. for 2 years, then had the opportunity to get into the medical field (following my brother), where I spent 23 yrs before retiring. I now have lots of time to reflect on lots of things, especially my woods wanderings and the like, as when younger. Whether my rationale is on track or not, I simply enjoy thinking and trying to perform tasks in various genre, disciplines or combinations of.

thoughts and why. I think, in a nut shell, I've always been passionate about nature and what it has to offer, including its art. I guess I was explaining, from a different perspective, why I liked your project. I, too, sometimes wonder if I'm just off the beaten path or lost in the woods. With many of my projects, I've tried to have as few straight lines or edges as possible, as in nature. When folks see the piece, their first instinct, I find, is they want to touch it, to feel it. I'll bet that's what you've experienced with your table (top): folks want to touch it, not just view it. Ever look straight up a tall tree. Trees don't "grow" straight up. They grow in a spiral, upwards. Its neat! Nature has lots of "odd things" about itself. It has been and still is enjoyable discovering them. I suppose, searching for and/or discovering nature's art can be an addiction/addicting. In my retirement years, I find mysel

My approach or sense, for a project, is more from/for the natural esthetics and art side, rather than from/with the technical aspects of producing the piece. Combining both is a plus. Hardly anyone readily sees the technical aspects, though. Their initial view or perspective is of the art or esthetics, as with your table. I think other comments, here, were in the ball park of my comment. I just pointed out something, specific, I've discovered about most of nature's products... no straight lines or edges... represented, in several ways, in your table project. Sonny

What a shame, Swingy, that your color blindness prevents you from enjoying something as natural as those special shrooms, or Tiny Dr. Tim's favorite medicine... <vbg>
-- Energy and persistence alter all things. --Benjamin Franklin
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On 10/11/2012 4:16 PM, Larry Jaques wrote:

Au contraire, mon ami ... that was the only time I was not colorblind! ;)
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Sacre bleu! (It was blue then.)
-- Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards. -- Vernon Sanders Law
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On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 2:01:31 AM UTC-4, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

Well done as usual. What color you gonna paint it?
RP
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and it'll be good as new, wot?
-- Experience is a hard teacher because she gives the test first, the lesson afterwards. -- Vernon Sanders Law
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On Saturday, October 13, 2012 6:11:35 AM UTC-7, RP wrote:

I do have two others I darkened with dichromium phosphate (drano/lye).
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