Steel Wool and Wax?

The last coat of finish on my son's ash bed has been curing since last Thursday (4 coats of T&T Varnish Oil) and then it will be ready for waxing with carnauba and installation. I've read here and elsewhere about guys applying the wax with 0000 steel wool. What is the advantage of this technique, if any, compared to waxing with the usual cotton cloth?
He doesn't know I built it yet - it'll be a great surprise when he comes up to visit next weekend.
Thanks. -- Bob
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The steel wool takes off some small bumps and high sheen. Give the finish more time to cure before applying the wax.
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Presumably to knock off nibs for smooter surface. Two birds stuff?

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I do this on wood turnings while on the lathe. A few coats of shellac. Buff it with 0000 wool. Apply paste wax with same steel wool, then buff with a soft cloth. Repeat a few times. The finish is beautiful!
Ms Leslie
--
She's got tools, and she knows how to use them.
"Bob Bowles" < snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net> wrote in message
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Only time I've seen wax applied with steel wool was when it was the ONLY finish being applied (wax on raw wood). Would seem to be the hard way to do it when you're just looking for a protective coat over an already well applied finish.

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I do this all the time. I wouldn't do it on a highly polished finish, but when I spray on a few coats of shellac and don't want to rub out it is a quick way to get a low gloss finish.
montyhp

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woodpile and uttered:

I used this technique on a pine stool, as part of the following process. The whole process outlined below produced a pleasingly warm lustre, but as I'm a bit of a newbie I can't say how much that was down to applying the wax with 0000 steel wool.
1) Sand to 240 grit
2) Apply 2 light coats of stain with Liberon "Palette Wood Dye" ("Antique Pine" colour), applied with a foam brush and wiped off with a soft clean cotton rag.
3) Apply 1 thin coat of Liberon sanding sealer
4) Sand with 320 grit
5) Applied 2 coats of wax (carnauba/bees mix) along grain with 0000 steel wool, lightly polishing each coat with a stockinette rag after allowing the coat to dry for a couple of hours.
The really nice thing about the wax, apart from the lustre, is the smell - makes you want to stay in the workshop!
The only places where the finish is a bit dodgy are where I either didn't sand well enough in step 1, or where invisible PVA glue splodges were highlighted by the palette wood dye. Luckily all of these "added character highlights" are in pretty inconspicuous places, so the piece wasn't ruined. You live and learn.
Cheers, Rob. Remove all capital letters to get real email address
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