Steel Toe Boots

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Tom Watson wrote:

I used to have a pair of Colorado brand low-rise work boots that were so comfy I wore them as street shoes. But that was 15 years ago, today they're probably made in China and might be anything but comfy. The MIC Coleman steel-toes I bought not long ago for rebuilding our garage are brutal even with gel inserts. If there is a specialty shoe store where you live that sells to people needing such footware it's worth your time to check them out.
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If you need the cross trainers, will they let you weaqr an overtoe?

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Timberland with Titanium toes.
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It's been awhile since I wore safety boots, so I have to ask if steel shanks are automatically part of today's safety footwear? Everybody mentions toe protection, but steel shanks are not mentioned at all.
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I don't think many do the steel shanks anymore. They do a hard plastic that flexes a bit, rather than the steel.
I have extremely flat feet and with no extra support, I will crush the boot soles down flat to meet the heels. I wouldn't have believed it, but the ABS shanks seem to work as well as the old steel shanks used to.
My favorites now are some model of Timberland. I liked them so well I bought three pairs and am on the last pair I squirreled away.
Robert
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Everybody mentions toe

I don't think many do the steel shanks anymore. They do a hard plastic that flexes a bit, rather than the steel.
And those hard plastic shanks would protect against puncture from stepping on a nail?
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Upscale wrote:

Plastic stops bullets in kevlar vests.
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stepping
Doesn't answer my question. As I understand it, Kevlar is a spun material. Are you saying that plastic shanks in safety boots Kevlar? Show me some advertising to that effect.
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wrote:

Not necessarily kevlar, but VERY resistant to penetration by sharp objects.
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Kevlar works well against blunt objects, doesn't do that well with pointy sticks.
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Robatoy wrote:

I can vouch for that, Kevlar canoe, Petawawa River in Algonquin Park, sharp rock, took some duct tape to get out of that situation, and a few extra days, more portages etc.
--
Froz...

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wrote in message news:af0297a4-c1e5-4116-95f2->

Kevlar works well against blunt objects, doesn't do that well with pointy sticks.
--
surprise, az just outlawed crossbows within the city limits for this reason.
oddly enough, a strong showing by para-olympic archery people got bows taken
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wrote in message news:af0297a4-c1e5-4116-95f2->

http://www.azcentral.com/community/surprise/articles/2008/09/26/20080926gl-nwvcouncil0927cover.html
Dovetail saws? Ball bats? Hand thrown Japanese chisels? They don't know how to respond to a bow and arrow because it isn't on their weapons list????? The world has definitely gone mad. (Pardon me this transgression. I'll ignore political flame bait in the future.)
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That ABS support in most of the work boots (not tennis shoes) is pretty substantial. In all the years of wearing Red Wings, I don't know that the steel shank support that was in the foot bed (app. 1 1/2" x 3") was tasked with stopping a nail or screw. Maybe it did and I didn't know about it.
But that wasn't why it was there to begin with. Those shanks (18 gauge sheet metal stampings) were put in there to help keep the boot from collapsing under hard pounding like I used to give them. I bought a cheaper pair of pull ons from Red Wing that they brought in from a foreign supplier, and they were just a pair of leather boots with a cushy sole. They were gone in about 6 months, destroyed.
At that time the Red Wing stores here were all franchises. I knew the guy that owned our local Red Wing store as he saw me fairly frequently, and he was so embarrassed about those boots that the gave me a good discount on my next pair of good boots. Those cheapies didn't have arch support or a shank of any kind, just a cushy cast sole. They would have been great for wearing on the weekends in the shop. Worthless for work. Their demise started when I broke down the foot bed snf distorted the shape of the boot with my flat feet because there was no supportive shank of any kind.
Lesson reconfirmed 20 years ago: No supportive shank, no purchase.
I never thought about the supportive shank as being a nail deflector.
Now watch me go to work and run a nail up through the sole of one of my Timberland boots after all these years of ignorant bliss.
Robert
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wrote:

That is what ultimately killed Bob Marley. He stepped on a nail and let it go. No joke.
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Well, don't forget, I haven't had need of protective footwear, (toe protection or nail protection) for close to thirty years, so my experience with the subject is woefully out of date. However, when I last worked in any type of production environment, both types of protection were always just one of the prerequisites to getting hired.
I'm willing to wager that the need for both types of protection is pretty much equal. To me anyway, it just doesn't make sense not to protect against both. Several times I've come across people who have stepped on nails, me also being one of them. I've never come across anyone suffering from crushed toes.
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Timberland makes steel toe shoes tht look like cross-trainers, kinda':
http://www.timberland.com/sm-steel-toe-boots--fi-1807598.html
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On Fri, 26 Sep 2008 14:25:02 -0700 (PDT), Tom Watson

Be sure to reach into the toe and feel the material that separates the steel insert from your foot. Some of them are very coarse material for longevity sake. You want one that is relatively smooth. And make sure there are no seams in the area.
The last pair I had were as described above and while they were comfortable enough they ate up socks on a daily basis. I finally just got rid of them, long before they were worn out.
Frank
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Thanks to everyone for the opinions. I bought a pair of Timberland Pro's with gel inserts this morning.
tom
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Tom, Skechers make steel toe work shoes. They have them in tennis shoe and cross trainer style. Here is their site: http://www.skechers.com/shoes-and-clothing/styles/work_and_industrial_shoes/steel_toe/list
They are carried by Academy sports and Shoe Carnival here. I found them to be comfortable and they wear well.
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