steel mesh gloves?

I have this huge paranoia about losing some digits off my hand, as does most people i'm guessing. Is there such things as steel mesh or kevlar gloves that a beginner can use before I can learn how to use all the tools?
thanks...
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Check into the chain mall gloves that meat carvers use to protect their hands,
William Lee

most
that a

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A mail glove might save you from sander rash and saber saw nips but a table saw would probably snag and drag your whole hand in or something. It is a lot better to learn about the various pushers and jigs you need to keep your hand away from the blade. Work "scared" of those things, think before you cut and be sure where the work is going to go. Don't try to work with small pieces of stock unless you have them in a jig that does all the holding, far from your hand. I usually do all of the cuts on the end of a long stick and cut it off last whenever possible. Then you can get back away from the blade while you are working. Everyone I know who got bit on a table saw was working with a small piece.
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Wearing gloves around woodworking machinery is a GREAT way to get your hands hurt! Dave

table saw

hand
work
have
all
possible.
I
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Dave W responds:

Some machinery. Some gloves. It doesn't make sense to work a table saw, jointer, lathe, shaper or router table with gloves on, but the new close fit, grip gloves are exceptionally handy for feeding a planer, and may actually be useful for SOME cuts on a jointer. I strongly prefer wearing gloves with rough wood, IF there will be no blade action close enought to latch onto the glove (your hand shouldn't be that near, anyway, but with that said, a knick on a finger, or even a lost tip, is a lot easier to deal with than a hand yanked into a cutterhead--if there is ANY chance at all of that, then avoid the gloves at all costs).
Charlie Self I don't approve of political jokes. I've seen too many of them get elected.
http://hometown.aol.com/charliediy/myhomepage/business.html
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On Sat, 28 Feb 2004 09:13:12 -0500, "Dave W"

I wear gloves around some of my machinery - particularly when I'm handling rough timber. The risk of a "grabbing" accident is low enough on thicknessers or tenoners - you can operate those and always keep a few feet from the moving parts.
Another approach is that of non-pull gloves. There are some around now that are like brigandine (archaic scale armour) or lizard skin. Hard impact-resistant plates are held in a weak rubber matrix. If the glove is pulled, it simply tears.
--
Smert' spamionam

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I count my fingers after every cut. Fear keeps you safe. Never get over that fear.
--

http://users.adelphia.net/~kyhighland


"Ah10201" < snipped-for-privacy@aol.com> wrote in message
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Yes, fear will keep you safe, but don,t be stupid......... friend I know has a cheap garage sale table saw(Ryobi, I think)......cutting a small piece of Pergio with a rip blade and using a bar-bar-que cleaner, the kind with the wire bristles, as a push stick......needless to say, he push the stick n two fingers into the blade....lost first knuckle on middle finger n chewed on the ones next to it. OUCH..... now he shoulda knew better, ohhh, no-guard either...saving a buck isn,t always a wise choice....

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Frankly, the thought of getting a hand CAUGHT in multi-horse power saw gives me the shivers
Use appropriate push sticks (multiple pushsticks if needed) is the way to keep your hands away from those sharp blades
John
On 28 Feb 2004 06:24:03 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Ah10201) wrote:

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Orthopaedic surgeons sometimes use Kevlar gloves. Very impressive too - you can stab away with a knife and it won't go through. Why? Sharp bone ends mostly and a puncture wound can have unpleasant infective consequences. I'd be cautious about using them with anything that would snag or pull however and I don't know how they would stand up to a TS blade.
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Don Mackie wrote:

Yeah, especially in the age of HIV.
--
Michael McIntyre ---- Silvan < snipped-for-privacy@users.sourceforge.net>
Linux fanatic, and certified Geek; registered Linux user #243621
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Yes but hepatitis a greater risk.
--
Just a smile. Just a glance.

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Yep, one in 400 is the continuing odds for HIV from a needlestick. One in three for hepatitis C.
However, Kevlar won't protect, only the barrier glove will, and the orthopods I've been acquainted with delegate the debridement anyway....
wrote:

bone
would
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I saw some fiber-embedded gloves a few years ago at a small hardware store that were being sold as woodworking gloves. I strongly advised the owners to only advertise them for their intended use: the front of the package clearly stated that they were safety gloves for chainsaw use. The fibers have nowhere to bind the blade on a table saw like they do on a chainsaw.
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I think surgeons use something else, but the Kevlar gloves I'm familiar with are knit and provide great protection against slashing wounds from a sharp edge drawing across the surface but no protection against puncture wounds. In my workplace (chemistry lab) when we need protection against puncture wounds we use leather gloves. If there is potential for a slashing type wound we use Kevlar and if there is possibility of both we wear one over the other. If really gets interesting if you need protection against chemicals because then yet another glove goes over the other one or two. No one picks up dimes in my lab :-).
In my home shop I use flexible leather gloves when handling rough lumber and knit kevlar gloves when using non powered tools with blades. I would recommend against using any gloves with power tools unless you need them for handling rough lumber and can keep you hands well away from moving parts. In most cases gloves + power tools increase the risk of injury and give a false sense of security.
--
To email me use: sjusenet AT comcast DOT net

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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Ah10201) wrote in message

I bought a pair of Kevlar gloves by mail order at least ten years ago. They were knit so would not protect against puncture wounds. I do not remember where I found them. I don't know where they are anymore either, maybe they're hanging out with all the right-hand gloves I've lost over the years.
Gloves can provide protection for using edged hand tools, but with power tools you run the risk of snagging the glove and having it pull your hand into the machinery, mangling it inside of the glove.
A severed finger can sometimes be reattached. A crushed finger is probable a lost cause and an ounce of prevention is still worth a lot of cure.
--

FF

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