Stationary Compressor Maintenance

Hi Gang
Just bought a new 60 gallon Rol-Air Compressor (oil sump) for my basement shop. I have two quick questions:
1.) I checked the archives, but could not find a good example for how often to empty and drain the tank, both of air and water buildup. Obviously it takes a while to fill the 60 gallon tank, so I figure that doing it every time I use it may be overkill. Every post I found said "regularly", just need a definition.
2.) I would like to install a water trap at the end of one line for a future HVLP sprayer (probably far in the future for now), and I was wondering if it is OK to run nailers off of the water trap, or if they benefit from a slight oil mist from the regular lines.
TIA Joe
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
I leave my drain minutely cracked, so it bleeds all the time. I mean just enough bleed so you can hear it if you are near. Water can get ahead of you and build up quite a bit if you forget to drain.
Nailers are fine with a couple drops of oil now and then. To really dry out, you'll probably want to use silica gel, which can be baked to reuse, or a refrigerated unit. It's a big advantage of turbines that they don't compress enough to cause condensation AND they put out warm air that keeps things dry.
Wilson

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I got a great deal on a "dead" Senco stapler with which someone followed this advice to oil. Once I cleaned out all the old gunky oil and put in a new rebuild kit I had a great stapler for $30 materials and some sweat equity.
Advice: Not all guns need oil.
Mike
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The usual standard they recommend is once a week.

Certainly OK to run nasilers with a water trap. You should however use Air Tool Oil and add a few drops to the outlet of your nail gun before each use. If you are using the nailer all day, you might have to add an extra couple drops half way through the day for good measure. Just check your air tools are not of the oil-less variety. In that case, you should not add any oil of course :)
-- Regards,
Dean Bielanowski Editor, Online Tool Reviews http://www.onlinetoolreviews.com ------------------------------------------------------------ Latest 5 Reviews: - Workshop Essentials Under $30 - Festool PS 300 Jigsaws - Delta Universal Tenoning Jig - Ryobi Reciprocating Saw - Infinity Router Bits ------------------------------------------------------------
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Is this a troll? How do you get the oil to go from the outlet upstream and back through the cylinder? Wilson

use.
you
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snip>
Air
Pull your tongue back out of your cheek & get a life Wilson. (They call it an error)
Nahmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BIG JOE wrote:

There's no need to empty the tank of air. How often you need to drain water from the tank will depend on the weather and how much air you use. Drain it every day to start; if no water comes out, you can reduce the frequency. Most air tanks come with tiny little drain valves that are hard to open. Replace it with a good ball valve to make it easier to drain. There are also automatic drain valves; look here on rec woodworking and also over in rec.crafts.metalworking for posts about these.
--
--
Steve

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BIG JOE wants to know...

Never for air; there's just no need. Water, every time it cycles on or off isn't too often. I installed an automatic valve to do just that. It's well worth the $10. Details here:
http://www.paragoncode.com/shop/compressor

The nailer might benefit from the oil, but I wouldn't rely on it. Nailers should be oiled directly at the start of each day, at least. I run mine after the trap.
Cheers!
Jim
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Thanks Guys
I haven't bolted it to the floor yet (maybe later today), so thanks for the hint on clearance.
I just figured out before logging on this morning I don't need to drain the air to bleed the moisture. I don't know what I was thinking.
BTW: After reviewing one of the links on another thread (T*P Tools and Equipment Diagram), I am rethinking whether to use soft copper. They highly recommend black metal. I just have to see if I can buy it in the appropriate lengths so I don't have to do any cutting and threading.
cheers Joe

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
OK, now I'm back to square one on the lines. The guy at Neu's Ace Hardwood swears nearly everyone uses "L" type sweated copper and that the steel will eventually start flaking into the airlines and affect finishing work.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Soft copper will work OK, or even hard copper with sweated fittings for a home shop. However . . the black iron pipe doesn't *flake*. Galvanized might! My SIL is a commercial plumber, and at least here in Southwestern NY State, code calls for black iron for compressed air piping.
Nahmie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
BIG JOE wrote:

What Norman said, iron won't flake but galvanized may.
You may get a bit of rust with black pipe. This is one of the reasons to put a ball valve at the end of each main/ leg. Blow out the line with full flow and chances are a tool isn't going to move what contamination's left.
Plus you want your filter/ separator close as you can get it to where your using air. You'll want to build a F/S stand and use a whip hose to connect it to the tap.
--
Mark

N.E. Ohio
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Based on that, I'll go with black iron. I will only have one line to start, which will have the filter/separator and regulator at the very end. I picked those up yesterday, the guy had a hard time finding 1/2" in stock. It will also have at least two risers in between, and an end line to blow out. I plan on pitching the line slightly downhill from the compressor.
Next summer, I'll run a second line to the garage for filing tires, etc., though I'm no mechanic.
Joe

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"BIG JOE" writes:

Some suggestions based on having designed and built a few compressed air distribution systems.
Use 2" pipe as the distribution manifold.
Go to a plumbing supply house and get a 20 ft length of black pipe, then have them or a local contractor cut it into 4-5 equal lengths and thread both ends.
Use 2" x 2" x 3/4" reducing tees to connect these pipes together with the 3/4" side tap pointing up to the ceiling.
Hang the 2" pipe assembly with a slight pitch away from the compressor.
At the end of the 2" pipe assembly, install a ball valve to bleed down the system.
Install a 3/4" hose between the compressor and the 2" pipe assembly.
Install two (2), 3/4", 90 degree street ells at each tee so that the outlet is now pointing towards the ground.
Plug unused connections with pipe plugs.
Hang hoses from connections that will be used.
Install filter/regulator/lubricator devices where used on an as needed basis.
Why go thru all the expense and aggravation above?
Several reasons that all have to do with keeping condensation away from the tools.
1) 2" pipe reduces the velocity of the air, thus reducing air temperature, thus reducing condensation.
2) 2" pipe reduces the velocity of the air, thus allowing any existing condensation a chance to drop out and stay in the 2" pipe.
3) The use of two (2) street ells forces the air to first rise, then turn 180 degrees before traveling thru the hose to the tool. Makes it more difficult for condensation to get to the tool.
HTH
--
Lew

S/A: Challenge, The Bullet Proof Boat, (Under Construction in the Southland)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.