Starrett combination square - worth the price

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The local dealer where I've been doing my shopping has a penchant for carrying absolutely the best hand tools available, no matter what the cost. My combination square disappeared when we moved overseas last year and I need to get a new one. So, Lowe's carry's Johnson models for $9-$12 each. I decided to see what my favorite woodworking store carried. They have brands like Inca and Starrett. The 12" Starrett combination square sells for $69.95!!!! Good grief! At that price, it ought to cook breakfast for me.
What meaningful, measurable difference would I get in a Starrett brand vs. the Johnson? I believe in paying for quality I can use, but not for just a famous brand name.
Bob
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snipped-for-privacy@earthlink.net says...

With moderate care, you'll never have to buy another such square: the Starretts' are that good. The metallurgy is up to snuff in the Starrett, whereas I have had numerous other squares tightening/sliding widget wear out in less than a year. That tells you something about how "square" these others are in short order.
Kim
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Bob Davis wrote:
<snip>

The Starrett will be square. The Johnson might be square.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA
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On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 05:29:07 GMT, "Bob Davis"

The Starrett is a Square.
The Johnson is more of a Random Angle Generator.
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 05:29:07 GMT, "Bob Davis"

The Starrett is a Square.
The Johnson is more of a Random Angle Generator.
Regards, Tom Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker Gulph Mills, Pennsylvania http://users.snip.net/~tjwatson
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You're paying (mostly) for accuracy, a little for name. Depending on your woodworking, a Starrett could be overkill. It's designed for metalworking which tends to have much closer tolerances than woodworking needs. If all you do is frame houses, it's probably not needed. If you do tight intricate furniture and custom work, it could be. It would also serve as a nice standard to measure all of your other squares against.
On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 05:29:07 GMT, "Bob Davis"

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jkajpust@###ameritech.net says...

try square, including a Starrett. Although it probably is the best try square around.
BTW, I have an early Stanley engineers square (patent date 1874) and it's still square after a 100+ years.
--
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1. It's not probably the best square around. It IS the best sqaure around.
2. Your engineer's square (I have one as well) is probably accurate enough for any woodworking, as it is with mine.
3. The Starrett is accurate based on the latest standards of measurment and accuaracy. All other squares are tested by comparign to a Starret. Really.
I had a crappy try square years ago. I've had the Starret for over a decade, and it is still perfect. It not only measures square, inside and out (as well as 45), the rule is a Starrett, the easiest to read, and is also accurate.
The slide mechanism is perfect, even after years of use. Not misuse. You get on, besides the cost, you don't want to misuse it. I have Norris planes, Knight planes, Two Cherries Chisels, a MiniMax bandsaw, a Unisaw. The Starret is my favorite tool.
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They compare favorably with Moore and Wright, Brown and Sharp, Mititoyo, ect, ect.

Totally false. I don't know where this rumor ever got started but the only place I've heard it is on this group. About time some set the record strait.
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The Starrett is a tool that will last for several lifetimes if cared for. I have one that is at least 50 years old and I use it daily. Having owned some cheap "squares" I can tell you to check them carefully and often. They usually are not square.
To check a square hold it to the edge of a straight board and scribe a line, then flip the square over and, using the same edge, check the line you scribed. The tool is out of square by 1/2 the amount of error you see.
-- Bill Rittner R & B ENTERPRISES
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Of course, that's only as accurate as the straightness of the edge of the "straight" board you're using. You may be measuring the curve of the edge of the board (times 2, of course). Which then begs the question "how do I test an edge for straightness" :-)
John
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John McCoy wrote:

With a Starrett straight edge.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA
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Nova wrote:

For the real hardcore: http://www.tdl.com/~swensen/machines/straight_edge/straight_edge.html
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On Mon, 29 Sep 2003 18:39:36 -0700, "Dr. Rev. Chuck, M.D. P.A."

I did that once to make my first 36" straight edge. I used 1/4" thick 36" bars of O-1. what a pain in the rear.
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Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices
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As a machinist, I've used my Starrett squares in the trade for more than 20 years and they are still holding up well. I also use them in my woodshop. Of course I live in Athol, Ma., the home of Starrett, so I wouldn't use anything else, plus, I get my tools at a very reduced rate
Bob Davis wrote:

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Dumpster diving for tools! It might be 89.87 degrees, but it's _exactly_ 89.87 degrees!
:-)
Mike
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In rec.woodworking

Just for fun, I calculated the error on a square that was 89.87.
On 3', the error is 5/64" and at 8' is 7/32"
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you can find them on ebay for a pretty good prices. I have gotten most of my squares from ebay.
--
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On Sun, 28 Sep 2003 18:57:16 GMT, Steve Knight

Are we talking tools or plane buyers here, Steve? <bseg>
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squares (G)
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