Staple gun recommendation

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Don't be a jerk. We were talking about 3.5" construction framing nails and you were not only aware of that you commented on it enough to toot your "expertise" based on it.
Now you attempt to apply the same thing to an 18Ga. pin brad from a cheap nailer to exemplify your point. Your example was moot and your attempt to side track was obvious.
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"Morgans" wrote in message
"HeyBub" wrote I dunno. The finishing nails/brads I use are a bitch to remove. . .
Yep. More often than not, the nail BREAKS OFF before it comes out, but some here say it has to rust for couple weeks. BUULLLLL SHIVICK !!! says me!
-- Jim in NC
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Yea BUT.
A housing area in San Jose was roofed with your kind of steel. The spec is SS.
After a couple of years you had large blocks of shingles falling and flying in the wind. The staples rusted and there wasn't a grip.
Most nails and staples are bound to each other by hot glue. The glue is liquid when shot in and locks the end in tight.
Martin
On 4/3/2011 10:14 PM, Josepi wrote:

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RS:
This may be more than you want to donate to HD but that comes with a 7-year warranty for an oil-less, pneumatic stapler that has proved flawless every time the trigger pulled across a range of applications:
http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-100666148/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId051&catalogId053
Amazon, eBay or elsewhere may have it cheaper. Check Google shopping too.
Assuming access, I'd check the joists from below before you do anything. Depending on the extent of your dry rot in existing plywood, 5/8" does seems to call out the minimum thickness for the new covering. The mentioned felt underlayment is a very good idea and my choice would be screws for the wood.
A little more outlay now affords extra insurance regret won't bite the backside later. But you're the boss.
Regards,
Edward Hennessey
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wrote in message
I think I need a pneumatic stapler for a project. Will be installing a 1/4" layer of plywood over an old 1950s 3/4" plywood floor that has a few weak spots and had vinyl flooring on it. Still have some glue spots from the old vinyl. Will be installing sheet vinyl over the new floor. Thinking the 1/4" layer of plywood will strengthen and smooth the old floor so it can accept the new sheet vinyl. Will also glue the 1/4" plywood to the old floor. Kitchen is about 10' by 10'. Three or four sheets of 1/4" plywood should cover it. Thinking the best way to fasten the plywood is with a whole lot of staples.
Recommendation for a pneumatic stapler to attach the 1/4" plywood to the old 3/4" plywood subfloor. I'd prefer to keep the cost to a minimum since this is really the only job I can think of for this stapler. I already own a small compressor that should be able to power a stapler. I don't think staplers capable of going through 1/4" plywood use a lot of air power.
Weak spots call for 5/8" underlayment, at minimum. Apply layer of 30 pound felt and ring shank underlayment nails.
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snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com wrote:

I've got one of these from Harbor Freight (twenty bucks) http://www.harborfreight.com/18-gauge-2-in-1-nailer-stapler-97524.html
We've used the staple feature to recover barstool seat cushions, attach carpet to largish cat furniture, and a number of other projects. It will certainly drive a staple through 1/4" plywood and into whatever's behind it.
In your case, it seems to be a pretty good $20 gamble.
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On 4/4/11 7:04 AM, HeyBub wrote:

Don't be so certain. :-)
I bought that gun for laying down some cheap engineered hardwood flooring, which is basically plywood. The gun did the job when I was using it in the tongue, but wouldn't sink very well shooting straight down. This was with the shorter staples, and after I cranked the air up to (and over) the suggested max pressure.
You may have to go through a few to find one strong enough.... maybe buy a few just to be certain you get a good one, then return the rest.
No big deal, though. HF guns have always been hit or miss. You buy one that isn't so great because of the cheap seals or whatever, you buy another and it shoots great.
The gun worked great for these projects and I never had a single misfire.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 4/4/11 11:54 AM, -MIKE- wrote:

My first comment was aimed at your second to last comment, not the lest. My entire post supports your last statement. :-)
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Apr 3, 9:33pm, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"
Well, I'd go with the green unit at Lowes for $79. I got their (I think its Makita) 15ga nailer and love it. This unit is light weight and has a good adjustable depth control. I've also found these staplers (I have a Bostich w/o depth adjustment) useful on many projects.
I suspect you are NOT wanting to move all your base cabinets - hence the idea of covering over the existing flooring. But the poster suggesting replacing the original plywood had it right. The 4x8 flooring material at Lowes/HD would provide a much better result and would not raise your flooring and effectively lower your counter heights. Of course, if you were planning on removing the base cabinets, there is no better approach than replacing the sub-flooring with new.
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Thanks everyone for the suggestions. Little hesitant about Harbor Freight stapler. I've been there. Bought stuff there. And some stuff is great. Even if it wasn't so cheap. Other stuff, I would have to be paid to carry home. Little leery of something complicated like a stapler. It has moving parts.
I think renting may be the best. Probably less than the cost of the Bostich stapler. Get a stapler designed specifically for subflooring. Use the right wide crown staples. Gun, compressor all in one bundle that works together. Less trouble overall. Pretty sure the town where the house is located has a tool rental store.
Regarding the comments about replacing the entire subfloor with 3/4" new plywood and checking the soft spots. The house has a little bit of termite damage. Two joists near the back door are rotted out quite a bit. Right next to the sill plate. Access to these for sistering in new joists along side is very limited. The furnace ductwork and several plumbing pipes run right under these rotted joists. And the stairway to the basement is right there too. No access for working. I really don't want to cut up the flooring above. But I will have to think about it. With a 3' x 3' piece of flooring removed right above the soft spot, I would have access to the joists and could sort of easily screw and glue some new ones alongside the rotten ones.
On Apr 3, 8:33pm, " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

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DIVERSION STAPLES ARE SPECIALIZED FOR FLOORING. The stapler is the same as the normal ones. The staples have tips angled in opposite directions and travle in opposite directions in the wood.
Your hardware store person should know about this.
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wrote in message
I think renting may be the best. Probably less than the cost of the Bostich stapler. Get a stapler designed specifically for subflooring. Use the right wide crown staples. Gun, compressor all in one bundle that works together. Less trouble overall. Pretty sure the town where the house is located has a tool rental store.
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On Mon, 4 Apr 2011 11:52:48 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

The flooring manufacturer will probably have a recommendation for some kind of underlayment. Then the underlayment manufacturer will have a recommendation for how often to nail it. Normally, the flooring guys use a 1/4" plywood underlayment that is stamped "underlayment" (no voids) and they nail it with 1/4" crown staples. The underlayment manufacturer wants staples no more than 2" apart on the perimeter and 6" in the field. It takes quite a few staples but you can go as fast as you can pull the trigger...or as fast as your compressor will keep up.
Mike O.
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On Mon, 4 Apr 2011 11:52:48 -0700 (PDT), " snipped-for-privacy@yahoo.com"

Mine's 5 years old and going strong. Suit yourself.

OK, but then you have to rent every time you need one. I figure that if I have to spend money, I'd rather spend it only once. (Of course, I'm a hopeless tool collector...)

Egad! Have you removed the termites yet? And it's an 8' drop to the floor if the soft flooring and/or joists lets go altogether? Replace all that flooring and rotted joists, man, before someone dies. No other action is _sane_. Borrow the money if you have to, but do it ASAP, eh?
-- Not merely an absence of noise, Real Silence begins when a reasonable being withdraws from the noise in order to find peace and order in his inner sanctuary. -- Peter Minard
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--------------------------- I have a Porter-Cable 1/4" crown stapler that I no longer need.
Have shot everything from 1/2" thru 1-1/4" staples with it.
If interested contact me off list.
Lew
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