Staining Kitchen Cabinets--Stain Won't

I have Scheinrich Kitchen Cabinets in my home that are darkish brown and about 40 years old. Most of the cabinets are in decent shape, but there are some small areas where the finish has worn off, and I would like to repair the worn areas. I am not interested in redoing all of the cabinets because I have a 3-year-old son, and he will eventually mess them up anyway.
A paint store recommended Old Masters Gel Stain (provincial color), and the color seems to a good match. However, when I attempt to stain the damaged areas, the stain doesn't seem to penetrate too much. Does anyone have any ideas as to how I should apply the Gel Stain (I previously cleaned the cabinet door with Murphy's Oil Soap before I applied the stain.), or whether I should get a different stain to try to touch up the damaged areas of the cabinets.
Thanks,
JD
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And are Scheinrich cabinets solid wood or wood with possibly manmade veneer on it? Is the area's you are trying to stain exposed bare, no finish but not necessarily no stain, wood? Finally, what kind of wood do you think we are talking about?
In the absence of the above information I would suggest.
Lose the Murphy's and use something like lacquer thinner to clean the area's. Murphy's can leave a residue that could interfere with staining.
Lose the Gel stain and get a liquid stain. Gel stains are gels because it limits the degree the color can be taken on to/in to the wood so it can be used on problematic, doesn't take stain well, woods such as pine and cherry.
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Mike G.
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I went to a couple of woodworking stores and got conflicting advice. One store told me it was particle board, and another store told me that it appeared to be maple. I am sorry that I don't know. It looks somewhat like Maple to me, but I am not an expert. Should also mention that I went to a paint store and they didn't know.

I have a little round area near the nob where people reached for the cabinet that is pretty much bare that I have been using to test stains. I cleaned it with Murphy's oil soap. Also, I lightly sanded it once, and the sanding did not seem to help with the stain. There are other small scratches, etc. that I would like to fix once I find the appropriate stain.
Thanks for your help, but you can see the pickle that I am in.
JD
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Yes, not knowing exactly what you are dealing with in regards to material and finish does make it a bit tough to make accurate suggestions.
Sanding will help because the "scratch marks" left by the sand paper leaves more areas for the stain to catch in. That is especially true of a pigment stain as opposed to a dye.
Best I can recommend with the information at hand is to keep experimenting.
To complicate your life a bit more I hope you are aware that stain alone is not a finish and requires some form of finish be put over it so it doesn't get wiped/worn off in very short order.
Good luck, sorry I couldn't be more help.
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Mike G.
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On 28 May 2004 16:27:41 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Decij) wrote:

if you have access to a digital camera post a closeup picture to alt.binaries.pictures.woodworking....
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On 28 May 2004 04:03:04 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Decij) wrote:

Did you sand that area? You may need to do that.
You may have a build-up of body oil...or other grease...that has put a protective coating into that area. You may need to go down to good, absorbent wood.
Have a nice week...
Trent
Follow Joan Rivers' example --- get pre-embalmed!
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I have read your other post. Since you don't know what you have, it is tough to know how to fix it.
However... The Minwax stuff that combines the stain and varnish in one material should work. It pretty much sticks to anything. Frankly, it is more like thin paint than stain and is impossible to apply evenly, but it will work for you. Is the cure worse than the disease?
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snipped-for-privacy@aol.com (Decij) wrote in

Some folks actually start with new work, and labor with great diligence to get to that 'well-worn' look. Doesn't appeal to me, but....
Having raised 4 sons, I can attest to the fact that they usually grow up, eventually. And some things are more important than fancy cabinetry.
Patriarch, who is now enjoying the visits from the next generation of high speed children....
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