Stain on end grain

I have just completed a night stand in hard maple. I need to stain it to match existing bedroom set. The top of the table has end grain exposed and I am concerned that it will be too dark when stained. What is recommended treatment for end grain prior to applying stain so that the color will match the top.
--
Bob



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rmemmen wrote:

Either sand the end grain using a finer sand paper than used to the rests of the table or apply a spit coat of dewaxed shellac to the end grain. As always experiment on scrap first.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
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    Greetings and Salutations....

    1) Seal the end with white shellac firs. That works fairly well, as the stain becomes a glaze that does not soak in.     2) I have not tried this, but, I have read that if one sands the end grain to a couple more grades of grit than the surface, it will stain lighter...so if you go to 200 grit on the surface, sand the endgrain to 400 grit or better.     3) (ok...a freebee). Don't stain it at all. Use it natural color, as modified by the finish itself.     Regards     Dave Mundt
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Dave,
I have used a technique on a quilt stand that was stained a dark mahogany. On the end grain, we wiped the end grain only with some mineral spirits before applying the stain. The mineral spirits kept the stain from being absorbed too deeply, and it turned out great.
As mentioned earlier, try it out on a scrap piece of wood first.
LB
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Regarding Dave's 2) below, finer sanding does work. The effect varies with the type of stain and wood used. An extreme on this is to power sand at 400 grit, and slightly burnish the wood (tricky). More often I'll wet to raise the grain, sand fine by hand, then apply shellac. I use a scrap piece first, coating sections with multiples of 1/2# cut of shellac, then stain and pick the best match. GerryG
On Mon, 12 Jul 2004 07:51:09 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@esper.com (Dave Mundt) wrote:

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