spraying minwax spar urethane

Has anyone ever tried to spray urethane out of a gun rather than brus
it on? If so, what type of spray gun will do the trick. Im working o some raised panel doors and would rather spray this stuff on than brus it. Im looking for an ultra smooth finish. I was told that if you pu the urethane on an old coffee pot warmer plate and let it get hot tha it would thin out for spraying. Just wondering if anyone ever tried i or some suggestions.
thanks, A
-- BIG AL 2
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SNIP
Al - no need to heat you product, and it might make a mess if you did. I am assuming that you want to reduce the viscosity, but you will screw the pooch if you warm it up and it is a lot colder or hotter than the surface you are spraying. Besides, even with Minwax you shouldn't have any problems spraying from about 60 degrees to 95. And with proper mixing of thinners, you can easily spray beyond those numbers. No kiddin'.
I always spray with the urethanes thinned about 10% or so, unless it is closer to the 95 degree mark, then it is less. If it is closer to the 60 degree mark, I might thin it a little more. Minwax is an easy to spray product, and very forgiving.
You don't need a special gun, or even an expensive one. Just get one that seals positively (so when you pull the trigger it shoots, and when you let off it quits), has a smooth trigger and is easy to clean. Remember to pick a gun your compressor can push, and that has a spray tip somewhere around 1.5mm (give or take a couple) for general finish spraying.
Practice your gun setup (spray pattern, pressure settings and material viscosity) and thinning protocols on a piece of scrap or cardboard before you start on your doors.
Robert
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How'd you say all that in so few words???? It takes me paragraphs to get through that.
--

-Mike-
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Well, I had to LMAO at that one. I think it helps to use more technical terminology that pertains to the subject like "screw th pooch". Hah!
Mike, I think you and me both post the longest replies here on subjects of finishing, and maybe on the group. I can be brief, but I have a tendency to read the group late at night when I am winding down, and once I get to whacking away on the keyboard a lot comes out.
Finishing is and continues to be a black art of sorts for anyone I know. It is easy to get going and in great conditions put down a great finish. But where the rubber meets the road is dealing with the variables. To me, when I am in science mode, that makes it interesting. When I am finishing a project for a client, the variables step up the challenge so I feel like I need to know everything I can.
I enjoy it here when we get a good thread going on finishing and we can compare materials, applications and results. There has been a lot of really good information passed around about finishing, here. I think it is always the best to learn from someone that has already resolved a problem you are experiencing, or the reverse side, being able to help someone with their problems.
Robert
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No kidding - me too. I'll find myself trying to be brief, only to later find myself adding explanation to explanation, to clarification, to examples and metaphores. Pretty soon I've got a freakin novel going.

That's the truth about any sort of finishing. The basic techniques can be mastered rather quickly with a little guidance. The chemical mixtures can be mastered by simply following instructions on can labels. After that, all of the adjustments for temperature, humidity, retarders that aren't really the right ones for the conditions, and all of the variables that go into getting a nice finish that does not require a ton of hand work after the spray, is a black art indeed. I've often thought that if anyone watched me spray they would have more questions about why I did things that were not really as I had advised in some post here, and all I'd be able to say would be... well, because.
--

-Mike-
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Mike Marlow wrote:

misunderstood ... and vigorously objected to.
I hope I quoted enough for you to understand which posting I am responding to.
Bill
--
Make yourself an honest man, and then you may be sure that there is one
rascal less in the world.
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BIG AL 2 wrote:

Yes.
Just about any of them.

Thin the product to the proper thickness for spraying, and practice on scrap. Note how thin products sprayed from an aerosol can are. You're going to shoot for a viscosity somewhere between the aerosol and the store bought "brushing" can.
Be aware that varnish dries SLOW and stays tacky for a while, so you will still get surface defects from dust.
Personally, I'd rather spray lacquer, with proper safety precautions, or wipe the thinned varnish on.
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Spraying requires the right equipment and technique. Without those, it's not at all easy. With both, it's pretty simple, but then you probably wouldn't be asking the question ;-)
You might want to try a good quality foam brush. I like the Wooster foam brushes they sell at Lowes. Quick, cheap, easy, and pretty much idiot-proof. I think you'll likely get the finish you want (no brush marks) with very little hassle.
Just don't shake the can or apply the poly in a manner that's going to create a lot of bubbles. Apply thin, even coats, sanding lightly between each one, yadda, yadda...
--
|~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~|
| Malcolm Hoar "The more I practice, the luckier I get". |
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I have sprayed Minwax poly with my HVLP (Accuspray) with good results. I used a .043 needle setup with no thinning, but it was in warm weather. Much luck--cd
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Im Building Some New Cabinets And Was Wondering If Anyone Has Ever Trie
Spraying Minwax Spar Urethane? If So, What Type Of Spray Gun Was Used? I Was Hoping To Spray Rather Than Brush Because Of All The Little Crack And Crevesas
-- BIG AL 2
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