Spray Contact Cement

I have a veneer project coming up. I have already decided I am going to use contact cement (not worth it to build a veneer press large enough - 48"x57") and need some advice.
What brand and product in that brand would you recommend? How messy? What about water based contact cement?
From what little I have been able to Google on this, spraying contact cement is "doable." Any hints, advice or help ridicule is most appreicated. ;-)
Deb
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Is the veneer backed? Like a paper or cloth backing? If it isn't, stay away from water based contact. I'd be inclined to use a can of 3M 77.
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Robatoy wrote:

Yes, the veneer is 22mil paper backed. Thanks for the tip on the 3m 77. Now, all I have to do is find it. It is amazing how many things are not available in Montgomery, Al. Watching the cooking shows (my other hobby) and the DIY shows where they say, "You can get this at your local ____." The chances of getting in and around Montgomery are not all that good. Thank goodness for online ordering. :-)
Deb
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HD has it on the shelf...even here in a small HD store. Try there?
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Robatoy wrote:

In my area, 3M 77 is also carried in most any hardware store, auto parts stores, office supply stores, photography stores, craft stores...
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BBbbut BARRY... (*whispers*) the Doc is in Alabama??
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:> Robatoy wrote: :> :> > HD has it on the shelf...even here in a small HD store. Try there? :> :> In my area, 3M 77 is also carried in most any hardware store, auto parts :> stores, office supply stores, photography stores, craft stores...
: BBbbut BARRY... (*whispers*) the Doc is in Alabama??
Actually Montgomery has 2 HDs and 2 Lowes, so I really don't understand the comment about not finding stuff there.
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km

They probably have Office Depot and Staples, as well.
I know all about Alabama. I saw the "Top Gear" episode where the hosts drove through! <G>
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Dr. Deb wrote:

I bought mine at Lowe's.
--
Gerald Ross
Cochran, GA
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Be careful using the solvent based. Fumes create a fire/explosion hazard. I just pour it out and spread it with a scraper.
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BTW, the spray comes out in a fan-shape. The right distance will give you a spray about 6" wide. The glue will have noticeable 'direction' to it. It is hard the explain. The 'grain' of the glue will show up as a 'vertical' pattern. Then when spraying the piece that you are going to attach, turn the spray pattern on that piece 90 degrees, so that the 'glue-grain' crosses at 90 degrees. Allow to dry till you feel a slight resistance (grabbiness *s*) when you lightly slide your clean fingers across the glue. The glue should not stick to you. Also, poke any large bubbles in the glue with a toothpick so that the gas can escape. And no open flames in the same building. That includes pilot lights. I'm sure you already know that.
At the HD type Borgs, they sell rubber rollers which are used to apply laminate. They can be a bit pricey, but by looking at them, you'll get the idea what they're about. A 3" x3" block of flat stock and a hammer works as well.
I don't know how big a piece it is, but suspending it with some clean dowels, about 3" apart (or other small sticks) then you get to align your piece and then remove the centre dowel and press the veneer down. Then work outwards from the centre by removing one stick (dowel) at the time.
r
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Fortunately, 3M 77 is a common find almost anywhere. You should find it right on the shelf at Home Depot.
--

-Mike-
snipped-for-privacy@alltel.net
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On Fri, 25 Jul 2008 17:38:21 -0500, Dr. Deb wrote:

Nothing wrong with contact cement, but if you're veneering a flat surface you don't need a veneer press. Hide glue and a veneer hammer will work.
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And if you decide to go that route, make sure you learn the proper way to use a veneer hammer first. ;-)
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Why bother spraying the contact cement, it usually needs to be dry or almost dry before you stick the pieces together, so U should have plenty of time to work with it. I would stick to (pun intended, sort of...) cement that is solvent based regardless of how it is applied. It would seem that the likely hood of the contact cement getting all over stuff you didn't want to glue is increased a bunch vs just brushing it on with a cheap brush.
I have seen two different designs that were "convert able" into a standing "desk". Both were conventional looking when in the "lowered" position, with the exception of the top being two pieces. The center part of the desktop where your keyboard and mouse might be located for ease of use, was lowered about 3-4", but when the top was raised This lowered piece would "slide" up telescoping extensions in the Round tubing of the front inside legs of the desk. These telescoping tubes were spring loaded and held in place by detents with push-in "locks" normally, and when you wanted to elevate the height the working area of the desk the detent buttons were pushed in allowing the lowered center of the desktop to raise up to be at chest level. I would look at it as more of a desk with a "fold-down" podium. My x-wife had to use one of these desks due to muscle fatigue that would make sitting down unbearable for very long, caused from a hip injury sustained in a car accident. She bought the unit from a Scandinavian business furniture store that went by the name of "Kidnap's" if I remember correctly. The store was in Beaverton, Oregon. The other "stand-up desk" I observed belonged to a VP in corporate IT in New York who was a business client of mine at the time. Although his desk didn't look much like the ione the wife used both desks functioned almost identically to one another, the person in new York had to use to the stand up type desk due to some sort of past injury also. I don't know what the brand name was of the desk used by the business client. As far as I know, my x-wife is still using her system and swears by it's ability to allow her to work effectively at home as a consultant whereas without it she claims she would not be able to work for very long, if at all.
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OOPs! The name of the Scandinavian furniture store should read: "Kinnarp's"

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