Splitter?

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I've seen so many ads for splitters that I can't recall which ones I've liked. I recently saw one in a magazine that looked promising. It seemed that it completely sat on the table top (without extending over the back) and was easy to remove without tools. I don't remember the manufacturer. Does anyone have a favorite? Thanks, Mark
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Delta makes such a product for their saws, as part of the overarm guard package, or as a service part, which is how I have it installed on my saw. Pull the throat insert, pull on one knob, and remove the splitter. 15 seconds to crosscut sled. Featured in a Kelly Mehler article in FWW a couple of years ago, available on their website.
Maybe $30, ordered through the local dealer. First installation took more time to remove the factory stock device than to install the new pieces.
You could also DAGS on a UnisawA100-initiated thread on making your own zero clearance insert, with splitter. Cheap project. Funny thread. Watch out for the tongue in cheek parts, but there's truth in there.
And then you can spend your hobby dollars on some fancy wood...
Patriarch More Signal. Less Noise. (tmcharlieb)
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Werlax wrote:

The problem with that type of "splitter" is it can't tilt with the blade .
The problem with fixed splitters is that they don't do much for you on shallow cuts - too much room behind the teeth coming up out of the saw table
Euro machine have a riving knife that wraps round the top rear quarter of the saw blade - close - and moves with the blade as you tilt it. Second photo here shows you one. this one's easy to get on and off - loosen a bolt, pull it out, tighten the bolt and cut.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/X31.html
charlie b
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charlie b wrote:

The riving knife looks promising, but I've seen that you can't retrofit it to use on US Tablesaws. Is this still the case?
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Its a nice theory that requires a machine shop to implement on an american design saw. Buy a European saw, hire a machine shop, or go with the practical compromise and use a fixed splitter of some sort.
Bob
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Werlax wrote:

Recently bought a Beisemeyer for a PM66. Easily removable. Excalibur is another one that's pretty good. Mounts through the insert to the main housing and thus turns with the blade. If you want something that is completely on the top, fashion a wooden insert with a finish nail in it at the appropriate spot. To cut at an angle, replace the insert.     mahalo,     jo4hn
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I've been using one of these for a couple of weeks now and have been pleased. http://www.microjig.com/MJ%20Splitter.htm and at $15 it doesn't break the bank.

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I have had that one a few months and it is a great unobtrusive improvement.
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I also like this splitter, it is no intrusive enough I go out of my way to put it on, and with board buddies I can literally stop the cut halfway and the piece to the right of the blade will have NO saw marks at all with my WWII.
The microjig splitter is also short enough, that I can use it with my cross cut sled.
Alan
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I like my biesemeyer but it's expensive.
Rob

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The professional advise is don't use one. If the wood is binding up on your blade, the splitter is just another friction point. The releasing tension within the wood is going to produce a warp in either one or both boards, but this can be alleviated nine times out of ten. Lift the board out of the saw and restart the cut. The offending twist is eliminated and the secondary board is effectively straightlined in the process.
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daclark wrote:

Wouldn't this assume that you noticed the case hardening and was able to turn off the blade and lift the board out before it binds and kicks back? I'm not that fast. ;)
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daclark wrote:

Bad advice is worse than giving no advice. Most instances of what are called "kickbacks" start at the back of the blade, when, for a variety of reasons, the stock at the back of the blade makes contact with the teeth coming up out of the table. That lifts the stock up into the teeth moving towards YOU.
A riving knife, set close to, and wrapping around the top rear quarter of, the saw blade significantly reduces the area where the rear teeth and the cut stock can come together, and then only during the initial part of the cut when the kerf has not yet reached the riving knife.
As for the friction produced by the riving knife, it's less than the friction between the stock and the table top and the fence if you're ripping.
To stop during a cut, be it a cross cut or a rip, you have to a) control the stock with one hand while the other goes for the OFF button and b) shift your attention from the cutting to the OFF button (OK, so there are knee switches and we probably should all have one but...). Either one of those can make a bad situation even worse.
If an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure then a pound of prevention is worth saving a digit or other extremity. Prep the stock correctly, set up the blade and the fence properly, use a riving knife if you can, a splitter if you can't, use hold downs and feather boards to keep the stock down flat on the table and against the fence in front of the cut whenever possible and use a push stick or push block if your hand has to get with 4 or so inches of the spinning sharp carbide things.
There are a lot of things that can cause a "kickback". There are lots of things you can do to minimize the likelyhood of kickback. The most important is knowledge. If you understand the causes you can take steps to protect yourself.
Here's some info that may give you a better understanding of "kickback" and what you can do about it.
http://home.comcast.net/~charliebcz/KickBack1.html
After proper stock preparation, a riving knife, properly set, is, IMHO, the second best way to reduce the probability of experiencing a "kickback".
As for tension being released and causing "warp", it may close the kerf but not likely enough to actuall warp the board. The possibilities are cup, twist, crook or bow or a combination that perhaps you could call "warped" In any event a feather board holding the fence side down on the table will keep that side of the cut from raising hell.
And if your stock is twisted for whatever reason DO NOT try ripping it. Get the bottom flat, one edge straight and square to the bottom BEFORE trying to rip to width or to get the other edge to parallel the one against the fence.
As for emulating "professionals" Sam Maloof freehands all kinds of ways on a bandsaw. But even he warns against doing it because it's dangerous as hell. And I'm sure there are a few "professionals" named Stubby one shouldn't imitate either.
rant mode off
charlie b
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(daclark) wrote:

Wrong, wrong, wrong.

No, the splitter is not "just another friction point." The splitter is there to keep the board from contacting the teeth at the rear of the blade, which is the principal cause of kickback.
Boards with significant internal tension are best used for firewood. If one simply must use one, a bandsaw is a far safer choice for rip cuts.

Dangerous and stupid advice. Lifting the board out of the saw is almost guaranteed to produce a kickback.
-- Regards, Doug Miller (alphageek-at-milmac-dot-com)
Get a copy of my NEW AND IMPROVED TrollFilter for NewsProxy/Nfilter by sending email to autoresponder at filterinfo-at-milmac-dot-com You must use your REAL email address to get a response.
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I am going to stand by the advise I gave, regardless of the rant. Most binding occurs at the beginning of a rip, and the time to pull it is before the blade has come to a stop, using the leverage that board length allows, and a splitter would only be in the way. This does require an ear tuned to the sound of the cut, which experience will provide. In that regard, perhaps I expect too much of fledgling woodworkers. I can assure you, Charlie, that after thirty-seven years of trade, I can still count ten digits. And, I looked at your $6000 beast...it certainly has all the bells and whistles...with your obvious fear of the machine and kickback experience, it looks to be the machine for you. But, until we can all afford the expense of over designed equipments... The splitter will remain, in my not so humble opinion, to be an unnecessary appendage, that is more apt to interfere with my use of the machine and create an additional hazard to my safety by such interference. We all know, that the safety devices provided with every machine are a matter of litigational coverup. Therefore, when it comes to my personal safety, I will continue to rely upon common sense and manual dexterity over device every time...and will rely upon my professional experience for the production of quality parts.
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"daclark" wrote in message

Not that we don't believe you, but you got any examples of these "quality parts" you've produced that we can look at .. you know, just so as to add further credence to your claim of professional experience and why your professional advice should be heeded?
--
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Swingman,
I have seen some of his work and it is first class. Suffice to say, regardless of whether you like what he says, or how he says it, he knows his stuff and 'walks the talk'.
I also hope he posts some more of his work, it's inspiring.
--
Greg

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"Greg Millen" wrote in message

his
Your word is good enough for me, Greg. But you're right ...the proof of the talk, is the walk ...and what I do like is to actually gaze upon the works of professional woodworkers, whether in person, or in picture.

"some more" ... I must of missed that, where?
I am glad to hear that, as inspiration is in short supply around here and, in particular, at my shop. All the more reason to ask for examples on a website, or ABPW, or anywhere?
--
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Last year he posted some work he was doing on ABPF. A series of carvings-in-progress that gave you that "Wile E. Coyote tongue falling on the ground, hang dog, ain't never gonna catch him" feeling. Similar to looking at Tom Plamann's work - good for the soul, bad for the ego type stuff.
I had a scrounge around my archives but couldn't find it, I was a little disappointed as I'm sure I had saved it in the Keepers Folder. Imagine when I peek in there and only found 1 (ONE) post - grrrr. I don't know what happened to them, I guess I'll spend the next few hours dumpster-diving into old archives and directories (folders for the non-DOS).
All this assumes daclarke is actually the real DA. It is getting hard to tell recently, though it seems likely it is him, the trolls are not as articulate. I hope so, we need a little philosophical discussion every now and again to broaden horizons and to expand the comfort zones. That is what he is driving at I believe, even the best of us should continue to learn and evolve in the craft, there is no single point that we reach where we can say - "I cannot improve any further". It is not like age, where we can state "We are as young as we are ever going to get", there are no absolutes and it's an evolving craft.
Anyway, I seem to have strolled off down another path, so, I'll get back on track by saying I hope he posts some of his work.
cheers,
Greg

the
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"Greg Millen" wrote in message

Maybe you're right. If that's who you're thinking about, the contrarian nature is there, but the work would tell the tale.
--
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