Spiral vs Jig saw

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I'm new here, so do not know the group rules. I'm also pretty new to DIY homeowner stuff. I need to install some handicap bars and step rails and refurbish a badly weathered deck. I'm not without some experience, having worked as a novice carpenter decades ago. I have most carpenter hand tools and a couple circular saws.
I need to do some work that once would have been the domain of the jig saw, a tool I'm familiar with, but these new roto-zip saws intrigue me. I need to notch some step boards on the deck and cut out a section of some 1-1/8" thk verniered particle board. Should I go with the older jig saw or would I be better served, in the long run, by the newer spiral saw technology, assuming I can't afford both tools. Thank you.
nb
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The Rotozip was originally developed to cut sheet rock/dry wall cut outs. It has been marketed as a do it all tool but in all seriousness it does not perform well on any material harder than sheetrock/ or drywall.
A jig saw would be a better choice and will work on a variety of harder materials than sheetrock. Consider also a Fein Multimaster. These particular is expensive however there are 3 or 4 "clones" out there that are much more reasonable in price. IIRC Bosch, Dremel, and Harbor Freight make their own versions.
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:> I :> be better served, in the long run, by the newer spiral saw technology, :> assuming I can't afford both tools. Thank you. :> :> nb
: The Rotozip was originally developed to cut sheet rock/dry wall cut outs. : It has been marketed as a do it all tool but in all seriousness it does not : perform well on any material harder than sheetrock/ or drywall.
: A jig saw would be a better choice and will work on a variety of harder : materials than sheetrock.
Second the recommendation of the jig saw. Also, the blades you use make an enormous difference. I've been vry impressed with Bosch's new line of Xtra Clean For Wood blades (T308B). Here's a review:
http://blogs.popularwoodworking.com/editorsblog/CommentView,guid,ab215e20-a34b-467f-96a7-cea63fb9a3f4.aspx
You can get them from Amzon (and probably locally if you're in a city).
    -- Andy Barss
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http://blogs.popularwoodworking.com/editorsblog/CommentView,guid,ab215e20-a34b-467f-96a7-cea63fb9a3f4.aspx
I have seen these blades, have you used Bosh blades in the past? Do these cut cleaner than the older Bosch styles? I only use Bosch blades and pretty much get a burnished smooth surface on hard woods using the regular Bosch blades, fine cut, with a Milwaukee jig saw. I get a "little" tear out on the top side when cross cutting Oak veneer plywood.
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Leon wrote:

I haven't yet tried the new Bosch, but I have used the older ones. I'm fairly sure the guys at PopWood have used Bosch blades before and they seem pretty impressed with the Xtra Clean ones. All other reviews have been positive as well (just do a google search).
Chris
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: :> :> :> Second the recommendation of the jig saw. Also, the blades you use make :> an enormous :> difference. I've been vry impressed with Bosch's new line of Xtra Clean :> For Wood blades :> (T308B). Here's a review: :> :> http://blogs.popularwoodworking.com/editorsblog/CommentView,guid,ab215e20-a34b-467f-96a7-cea63fb9a3f4.aspx
: I have seen these blades, have you used Bosh blades in the past? Do these : cut cleaner than the older Bosch styles? I only use Bosch blades and pretty : much get a burnished smooth surface on hard woods using the regular Bosch : blades, fine cut, with a Milwaukee jig saw. I get a "little" tear out on : the top side when cross cutting Oak veneer plywood.
My impression is that they do cut cleaner, although I haven't used them enough in a direct comparison to be 100% sure. I've used the new ones mostly in pine (my son's a cub scout, and I was doing the cuting for the boys in a pack meeting last week). The new blades leave a finish that's smoother than a Timberwolf blade on my 14" bandsaw, with essentially no tearout (I was expecting the pine to tear out on the top). The different may be more apprent with softwoods and plywood than with hardwood.
    -- Andy
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wrote:>

Thanks, I'll have to try a pack next time I buy blades.
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An AMAZING blade. Truly a break-through in jigsaw blades.

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Jigsaw. Bosch offers a neat package with a 5 amp D-Handle saw that comes with a Random Orbital 5" sander. It was selling up here in Canuckistan for $ 149.00 for the pair.
Those RotoTools are useless. If you want one of those, go to a pawn- shop and pick one up for next-to-nothing... there's a reason they're cheap.
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On Thu, 5 Mar 2009 09:40:04 -0800 (PST), Robatoy

...I fell into that trap a few years ago...there it sits: Yard Sale fodder...
cg
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notbob wrote:

Consider the Harbor Freight Multifunction tool http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumbere700
It's identical in function to the Fein Multimaster (but about $250 cheaper). Here's what the Fein (and HF) tool can do. Watch this video for the notching project you have.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nynD2SfyINU

Since the Fein patent expired late last year, others have duplicated the tool. Harbor Freight, Dremel, Bosch, and others make a replacement tool - and all the blades between manufacturers are interchangable.
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Wow! Pretty impressive. What's the generic term for this type of tool, in case I can't get to a Harbor Freight (forget Fein! ;). Thanks.
nb
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notbob wrote:

Dunno. A "Multi(something)" I guess.
You'll get to HF - or have them get to you. The Dremel rendition is about $100, the Bosch and Rockwell varieties slightly more.
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HeyBub wrote:

Most recent flyer from Harbor Freight has the "Multifunction Power Tool" for $39.99.
Blades: Diamond cutter or 3 Blade set - $5.99 Half-moon cutter blade - $5.99
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And those fit Feins?
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wrote:

And those fit Feins?
The sand paper does not fit the Fein Holder. Apparently the wrong type hook and loop, they stick but not tightly and they are also larger than the OEM Fein.
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From the Dremel website: http://www.leevalley.com/hardware/page.aspx?c=1&p@246&cat=3,41241,41267 A: The Dremel Multi-Max tool only uses Dremel accessories. Dremel Multi-Max accessories are compatible with Fein Multimaster model 636 and Bosch Multi-X model PS-50.
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Now that was funny!
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I FINALLY talked to someone that used the Rockwell Sonicrafter. He loves it.
He is the manager of a local lumber yard, and they sell the full line of the Rockwell branded tools. He does a lot of general stuff, but doesn't use his tools full time.
He told me that his BIL has one these things (bought from him of course!) and he does a lot of contract repair work. He loves the machine and it has a permanent place in the truck.
I asked him about the overall view of the Rockwell brand. He says that in a year or so, they haven't had but one tool come back because of a defect (battery). According to him, the contractors he sells the tools to think that the tools are solid and well priced.
He admitted the sales were slow, but attributed that to the fact that little advertisement is done outside trade mags or the normal wood/DIY mags. The public doesn't have much awareness of the revamped brand.
On another note, I received a DeWalt rotary tool for Christmas about 5 years ago. I used it one day... I have no idea what to do with it. Since LOML gave it to me, I cannot sell or trade it. \ You would think doing all the repairs and remodel stuff I do it would be invaluable, but the only time I used it was when I was setting some tile myself and wanted to cut some holes in the tile. I would stay away from a rotary unless you have identified a task that only that tool can perform.
Robert
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wrote:

I bought a Roto-Zip type tool thinking I would use it for all kinds of home remodeling jobs but as others have stated it doesn't do all that much very well. What I did find it useful for was cutting holes in a lath and plaster ceiling to install recessed light cans. I burned up a couple of carbide bits and made all kinds of dust but didn't have a lot of patching to do (house built in 1938). It also does a decent job on ceramic tile with a carbide bit for enlarging holes and trimming odd shapes and of course cutting out holes in drywall with the proper bit. My personal experience is that it doesn't cut through wood thicker than say 1/4". I would choose a jigsaw or Sawzall-type saw as being more useful. I don't have any experience with the Fein-type multitasker though they look intriguing.
Dale
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