Spiral cutting router bits

Please excuse the naive question... but I read about spiral cutting router bits hither and yon. But what is the upside? Downside? Are these plunge bits for the router table? And where's the best place to get them?
Thanks much, Jack
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Smoother cut, because they slice diagonally.

They cost more, and they may be harder to find.

Could be, but not necessarily.

Depends on what you mean by "best". :-) If you're looking for high quality, never mind the cost, go for Whiteside bits, available at various places. If "best" means "best value", it's hard to go wrong buying from Lee Valley. Woodcraft's house brand is decent quality, too, at an affordable price.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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:>Please excuse the naive question... but I read about spiral cutting :>router bits hither and yon. But what is the upside? : Smoother cut, because they slice diagonally.
There's also upcut and downcut spirals. Upcut pull the wood in the direction of the router, downcut do the opposite. Pick whichever one gives less chipout on a show face.
I've also seen double-cut types, which are downcut halfway and then switch to upcut.
    -- Andy Barss
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Doug Miller wrote:

the blind hole) when cutting a mortise. Having the wood pulled toward the router base also helps with control of the stock.
Bill
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Life is like playing a violin in public and learning the instrument as
one goes on.
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Thanks, folks. I've learned a lot. Now to sharpen the Visa card...
Jack
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Before you do, look at 2 flute, aluminum cutting carbide end mills. They are made for milling aluminum in a milling machine. Identical to spiral router bits. Generally of higher quality and lower price.

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Not the ones I'm familiar with. They're not made for wood, but for stouter material which removes in smaller pieces.
Sort of like a hacksaw, which will certainly cut wood, but it's no match for a Ryoba.
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Assuming that you are a thinking person, you would then have to conclude that you are not familiar with the right ones.

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the like.
Usually works pretty well as it removes the chips as you go, where as a straight bit usually leaves a slot full of dust and chips behind.
One word of caution though.... hold on to your work piece, firmly. Mine has a tendency to pull the work piece through and sometimes away from the fence, generating less than desireable results.
There's also an 'up cut' and a 'down cut' version of the spiral bits.
Check out http://www.woodcraft.com/articleprint.aspx?ArticleIDD5 for more details..
HTH, Ron
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