Spindles on kitchen chairs

I have several loose spindles on my oak kitchen chairs and want to fix them. I know the ultimate fix would be to pin each of these with a dowel. Does the "spindle tightening glue" work or is it just a temp fix to the problem?
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mrbubl wrote:
> I have several loose spindles on my oak kitchen chairs and want to fix > them. I know the ultimate fix would be to pin each of these with a > dowel. Does the "spindle tightening glue" work or is it just a temp fix > to the problem?
Am not familiar with the product; however, from your description, it has all the markings of something a snake oil salesman would try to sell.
The only gap filling adhesive I'm aware of that also provides gap strength would be epoxy.
Don't think it would be a good fit for oak.
Lew
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Clarification --- Do you mean stretchers? If so, try to disassemble the undercarriage and reglue and clamp the parts. There is a solution available that will swell the wood, but I find that re-gluing will hold longer.
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That stuff doesn't work too well. The true problem here is that the chairs were not properly. Remove all the old glue, clean with acetone, a fox-keyed tenon might work.
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What are they made of? How old, and how well made? When you say "oak", did that grow on an oak tree, or is it modern painted-up jummywood?
If it's 40-50+ years old, real oak, with decent construction and suffering from honest wear by racking a joint, then the "Chair Doctor" glue is good and works well. Note that it only works on loose tenons though, not worn-out or broken ones. It swells wood, it doesn't gap fill.
If it's jummywood, then the wood itself is too soft to form a firm joint by swelling a tenon. It'll swell and fit in the workshop, but a week later it's loose again.
The only adhesive I know that will gap-fill on a chair tenon is an epoxy with a suitable filler. It's a hard-working joint - lesser adhesives, like PU, just won't last.
Whatever you do, don't use a foxed wedge tenon to repair it. You can't dismantle these without breaking things in the future. As a good chair should outlast several repairs, this isn't a good thing.
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