Spindle sander

I feel silly asking, but I was using a portable spindle sander tonight on a piece of cedar. I found it hard to use it without leaving ridges. I tried using it fast & slow, I came to the opinion that moving it slower over the work was better. Any tips? Maybe using a table mounted one is easier. I thought it would be very easy to fair out a curve using it.
Chris
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

What portable spindle sander are you using and at what grit?
Look into oscillating spindle sanders. I think the oscillations make it possible to avoid this problem. I bought a rigid that received very high marks in a recent issue of Fine Woodworking magazine. Does both spindle and belt sanding with oscillations.
http://www.ridgid.com/Tools/EB4424-Sander /
--
www.garagewoodworks.com



Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
It's a Porter cable oscillating sander with an 80 grit.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
"Chris" wrote:
> I feel silly asking, but I was using a portable spindle sander tonight on a

tried
over the

easier. I

it.
What you tried to do is not easy.
Think of a router in a table with a reference pin installed to allow you control of the piece as it approaches the bit.
You have essentially the same task with your sander.
If this is a concave curve, then you have little choice.
If this is a convex curve, then it is impossible to beat a fairing board and a batten.
When your arms feel like they are ready to drop off, your piece is fair.
Lew
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Site Timeline

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.