Spent the whole week in the shop....


and I didn't even get a couple of adirondack chairs built! It started out as a simple, fun project. I salvaged 10 or so 4x8x8 redwood beams from a remodel job last winter and finally decided it was time to make something from them. Armed with some of drawings, I hit the shop Monday to start resawing... After trying to unsuccessfully maneuver those beams around, I decided it was time to stop and clean up things a little...... One thing soon led to another, and by Friday the shop had undergone a full restoration. It took two trips into the big city over two days and spanned at least half a dozen tool stores. . Everything got cleaned, tuned up, re-arranged, re-arranged again, organized and reorganized. All the screws, nails, and errant hardware now resides in a couple of pick racks from Harbor Freight. The new 718 now sports a Forrest Chopmaster and the old Rockwell "Contractor's Special" now has had a complete tune up with a Super Bar and sports a WWII. The band saw has a new 3tpi hook tooth, the jointer has new knives as well as the planer. The mortising machine got all the chisels sharpened. I also added 20ft. of 2.5" flex pipe to the dust collector and picked up some shop vac attachments to clean the place up. Start Saturday morning.... went out there first thing to rough out all the pieces for the chairs. What a joy it is to work in a clean, organized shop with tuned up tools and sharp blades all around! (It'll probably will be the last time until next year!) I made all the templates, cut all the parts and routed them in what seemed like record time. The Forrest blades, so far, have been an absolute pleasure to use. That old table saw has never cut things so smoothly. Cleaning up was almost fun (did I say almost?) with the shop vac attachments for the DC too. The one thing I was not looking forward too was sanding all those parts. As much as I'd like a drum sander, it's just not in the cards (yet). So today, I built a downdraft table. Just a 18"x30" box with a bottom that slopes from near the top to the bottom where I cut a 4" hole to attach the DC, and a piece of scrap pegboard for the top. Works really good, no dust could be seen in the lights after sanding all 100 or so parts. One bad thing though, it whistles annoyingly throught the holes in the pegboard . Oh well, that's another day. Christmas vacation is over after tomorrow, and I have some chairs to assemble! --dave
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wrote:

Great post!
Congratulations!
Tom Watson
http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
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...And here I am with three mental illnesses and trying to learn basic stuff... I wish I had your kind of energy! Many congrats on the great life.
--
Alex - "newbie_neander" woodworker
cravdraa_at-yahoo_dot-com
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"Dave Jackson" wrote in message

Your obvious task for next time is to resize those holes so it whistles "Dixie". ;)
Good story ...
--
www.e-woodshop.net
Last update: 12/13/05
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-snip-

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Amen to that, brother! I finally got the shop set up and cleaned up after a move. Took me three solid days of cleaning, sorting, sweeping, dragging, tossing, digging and lugging. Still haven't really done tool tune-up, though, at least not on the big floorstanding stuff. That being said, it sure is nice to run boards through the saw without having to straddle a lawnmower... :)
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Try chamfering, or better radiusing (abrasive in a split mandrel), the air inlet side of the pegboard holes to smooth the air flow to increase CFM while reducing peak air velocity though the holes. A sharp edged fluid entrance produces a 'vena contracta' which can greatly reduce the effective flow area of the hole. See, for example http://www.bsmagri.com/cgi-bin/dictionary/dictionary.cgi/vent/vena%20contracta /. This reference http://www.research.ibm.com/journal/rd/211/ibmrd2101I.pdf (figures 12 and 13) indicates that the minimum radius needed to restore full flow area is about 15 percent of the hole diameter. For example, radius .038" for a .25" diameter hole.
I have noticed in Lowe's small panel area some 2' x 4', molded white plastic pegboard panels with nicely radiused holes for about $12/each and thought that, airflow-wise, they might make a dandy top for a downdraft sanding table. Unfortunately, the plastic is rather slippery, but perhaps this could be compensated by overlaying with rubber mesh shelf liner material.
David Merrill

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Thanks for the tip! BTW, I did overlay the downdraft top with a router mat (well, shelf liner) and it kept things from sliding around, yet still allowed the dust to flow down. When I find the time to fix the whistling, she'll be a real gem. --dave

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