Speaking of home wood-related repairs...

Page 5 of 5  
On 10/06/2009 07:32 PM, CW wrote:

Sorry for the delay...the heat treatment keeps it from being brittle from work-hardening when the threads are rolled.
Chris
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wrote in message

Typical wood screws are not heat treated. They are made of a low carbon, cold work steel. The rolling and heading process compact the steel increasing toughness without making it britle.
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On 10/11/2009 07:09 PM, CW wrote:

What's a "typical" wood screw? Spax screws are definitely heat-treated, and they're actually cheaper than the junk at big box stores. Same thing for the Robertson screws available at Lee Valley. I imagine the ones from McFeeleys' are also heat-treated, they certainly did well in the test in Woodworking magazine.
I've basically given up on low-grade screws and will only use the premium stuff.
Chris
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B.
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*snip*

When visiting some family, we took a trip out on their boat. The dock had been recently redone, using new material and nails. The only reason we could think of using nails instead of screws was that they figured the dock would rot fairly quickly anyway, and the nails would be easier to get back up.
All speculation, of course, but might we have been on the right track?
Puckdropper
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I was given a 50lb. box of dry wall screws by my buddy. So I screw everything ..
Jerry
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/MyWoodWorkingPage
http://community.webtv.net/awoodbutcher/1974RuppCentair
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"Jerry - OHIO" wrote:

We won't go there<G>.
Lew
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On Tue, 6 Oct 2009 23:08:21 -0700, the infamous "Lew Hodgett"

What, you don't think a coarse 1-5/8" tool is exciting to girls? Poor Jer...
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On Oct 6, 10:47pm, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net (Jerry - OHIO) wrote:

Jerry-
Drywall screws are meant to install drywall, that's it. They are not a general purpose fastener, esp not for any kind of serious load. Drywall screws are hard & brittle....they pretty much suck but do work for drywall.
Drywall screws have ruined countless redwood or cedar fences. The fence might look ok when you drive away but a few months later the face boards will be streaked with rust.
I wonder how many kitchen cabinets installed in the last 15 years with drywall screws will come down in the next big SoCal earthquake.
Don't be hack; use drywall screws for drywall. And get some decent screws for general work.
cheers Bob
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On Tue, 6 Oct 2009 13:43:47 -0400, "Joe AutoDrill"

I typically use screws, but find nails better for molding. Nails can pop a little, but there are applications where that is not a concern. It is rare that I use a nail/screw for fine furniture, but they have their place too.
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