SPAX Multi-Material Screws vs. Standard Wood Screws

I was in HD yesterday looking for #8 wood screws in 2.5" or 3" lengths. They did not carry those lengths in anything other than the "2 packs" ($1.18 ea) so the clerk suggested these:
http://www.homedepot.com/p/SPAX-8-x-2-1-2-in-Philips-Square-Drive-Flat-Head-Full-Thread-Zinc-Coated-Multi-Material-Screw-1-lb-Box-4101010400606/202041007
I should note that the website shows "Full Thread" for those screws, but in the 2.5" length, the actual product on the shelf has about 1/2" of unthreaded shaft. (Same SKU, different screw)
They are slightly more expensive than the same size package of standard wood screws would have been, but way cheaper than buying a boatload of the 2 packs at $1.18 each.
BTW I'm not asking for a source for #8 2.5" wood screws, I'm just curious about how the multi-material construction screws would work in place of wood screws. I would never trust the "no need to predrill" claim for anything that I cared about, but other than that, would there be a problem using these screws in wood?
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The SPAX screws work well in wood.
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On 9/15/2016 9:42 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

IME, German made Spax are well engineered, work well in wood, and are well worth the extra expense for applications where sheer force strength is required.
Just insure they're not chinese ripoffs, because those are on the market.
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On Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 12:04:04 PM UTC-4, Swingman wrote:

The box says Altenloh, Brink & Co. U.S., Inc.
"Manufactured in U.S.A. or Germany"
What are your thoughts on the "No Pre-Drilling In Wood" claim?
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On 9/15/2016 12:11 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Try on a scrap. I use Spax screws to attach cabinet backs because they are no predrill. In those 5/8" lengths I have no issue with no predrilling. FWIW this is nothing new, pocket hole screws are self taping with no predrilling in the mating piece.
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On Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 1:38:00 PM UTC-4, Leon wrote:

I will try some scraps. I'll be using the 2.5" screws to hold three pieces of 5/4" stock together. They'll be counter sunk for plugs so 2.5" will be enough to grab all three boards.
The tapered counter sink bit will result in some pre-drillng, but if I don't have to go the full length, that will certainly save some work.
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On 9/15/2016 12:56 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

FWIW it never hurts to predrill assuming you don't drill to large in diameter.
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On 9/15/2016 12:11 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Never had a problem with them in framing lumber, or in places that were never destined to see the light of day again.
That said, I always pre-drill/countersink screws on most furniture type projects, as well as in in places where they will be seen, so I can keep the countersink relatively consistent.
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So... no one asked me, but...
Karl and Mike (drums) spoke highly of Spax for some time, and I bought some to try out on a project a couple of years ago. Like all fasteners, they d o some things better than others, but overall they have turned out to be a great addition to the repair kit arsenal.
They are VASTLY superior quality to the crap in the little plastic bags as they have sharper threads making them easy to drive, the screws down break down the body (and on occasion have to be drilled out of a failed driving a ttempt), and the heads don't twist off. And they even give you a driver.
The "no drill screw" has been around as long as I can remember, but seemed to hit its stride with he advent of drill driving around 35 or so years ago . The concept is so easy it is silly. When you drive a screw without a pi lot hole, you move the fibers of wood from side to side by brute force. It takes a good screw and a good driving apparatus to drive screws into harde r woods without a pilot hole as the friction and pressure on the screw (and the driver) can make it a hard task in itself.
A screw with a cutter milled/stamped into it handles things differently. T he head of the screw is inaccurately viewed as a "drill" when it is more of a shredder or tearing feature. It rips the fibers of wood apart, separati ng them from one another and cuts the friction on the screw while driving d own immensely. The cutter is smaller than the overall width of the threads so the bit of the screw is not diminished, and in fact is much better than a screw driving into a pilot hole of the wrong dimension. Since most peop le don't know how to select the correct bit size for a pilot hole, this is a good thing followed by good results.
And it really cuts down on the time and effort to drive screws. Using Spax , I drill about 1/2 (literally) of the pilot holes I used to when making re pairs. Never had a Spax screw fail (!?!??), never broke a shaft, never tor e a head off. I did put so much pressure on a 3" Spax when driving into so me ancient plywood (laminated to about 2" thick when the house was built in the very early 70s) and the shaft <bent> under the pressure from my impact driver. I was very impressed with how strong they actually are.
So, Spax is good. I use them on everything I can, and although I used other screws besides Spax for years, I quit buying that chrome plates crap in te h little bags 20 years ago. I only use them for light loads where appearan ce is a factor. The hole cutter on Spax good, properly designed and actuall y works as it should. I always keep them around and use them generously in repair work.
Robert
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

Depends on the wood. In construction grade lumber they go in fine. If it's something you would have to drill to nail then drill for SPAX.
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On 9/15/2016 11:03 AM, Swingman wrote:

they are a higher quality screw regardless. Probably a German company manufacturing in the U.S.
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On 9/15/2016 12:35 PM, Leon wrote:

They're made both places, and few years back those made in Germany were about all you good buy. I still have a few of the German ones in the shop.
I don't see a difference between them, except that they have come done in price since I first starting using them.
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On 9/15/2016 12:45 PM, Swingman wrote:

I have noticed that price come down significantly too. The 5/16" lag screws were well over a $1 each 6 years ago. IIRC I paid less than half that this past Spring.
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On 9/15/2016 12:50 PM, Leon wrote:

Yep, and very probable because of the location of manufacture (US versus Germany) ... it is still cheaper (taxes, competitive pricing, and regulatory complexity) to manufacture some items in the US than in many Western European countries.
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snipped-for-privacy@eznet.net says...

SPAX work fine. Be careful using them for anything whose failure might result in injury though--I've occasionally (maybe one out of 50) busted them while tightening them (with an impact driver--haven't ever busted one tightening by hand)--I suspect that they were overhardened but the last ones I bought were a decade or so back and I'm still using them up so don't know from personal experience if that has been rectified.
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On 9/15/16 9:42 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Short answer: SPAX screws are better all around, period. No need for the long answer. :-)
I go for Spax or other structural screws over the standard wood screws every time, now. They are far superior and not any more expensive when you take everything into account.
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On Thursday, September 15, 2016 at 10:42:22 AM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Consider this a blanket thanks to everyone that answered.
There appears to be a very positive consensus.
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On 9/16/2016 6:00 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Well, to be honest most any screw that is sold as a particular brand in individual bulk is typically a better screw than loose screws, screws sold prepackaged a few at a time, etc.
Kreg screws are pretty good screws also.
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On 9/16/2016 8:13 AM, Leon wrote:

Yep, I do like Kreg screws, as well as Fastcap's cabinet screws for certain applications (like fastening a run of Euro cabinets together)
And, I also keep an assortment of Rockler's #8 square drive, lube finished screws on hand for general shop use.
AAMOF, those reside in the Keter box (I now have two of them) you gave me years ago. I try to provide the screw/fasteners on a remodel project (to keep the use of crap fasteners down), so that box always goes with me to a job site.
I make a point of topping it off every time I make a trip to Rockler for something else.
https://goo.gl/photos/jsj6qKD5dAxapECCA
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