Spacers, tubing with very thick walls?

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On 3/31/2011 12:30 PM, John Doe wrote:

For skaters, maybe...I knew what the common app is but couldn't have told what the dimensions actually are. Turns out they're 22ODx8ID (mm) nominal...
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It may verry well be a common piece of hardware, so is a #8 screw. Do you know the thread and root diameter of that?
If you want credable suggestions try not to make it hard for some one to help.
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Bar stock with a hole bored in it. What lathes were made to do.
Stan
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http://us.misumi-ec.com/us/ItemDetail/10300234620.html
--
Ned Simmons

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Ned Simmons <news nedsim.com> wrote:

It looks easy enough, hopefully I got it right.
"FNCLA-V8-D22-L64.0-VKC-HKC" aluminum, 8mm inner diameter and 22 mm outer diameter (the dimensions of a 608 bearing), 64 mm length
Apparently the VKC-HKC checkboxes make it more precise.
FWIW. I am planning to stick slices of the machined aluminum tube in place of 608 wheel bearings, then stick a rod through them and glue them to the rod, so I can use any skate or kick-scooter wheel as a drive wheel. And naturally use 608 bearings for the fork to hold the rod/wheel against the ground.
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Got it, looks good. Hopefully useful in my current project.
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Thrust washer or bushing

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I should have added that it's generally rolled after piercing, too.
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Ed Huntress

> Once upon a time it was the best tubing, but DOM made from flat sheet is
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With those dimensions, drilling a 1/4" (or whatever size you actually want, since you say "no greater than") hole in a solid aluminum rod would be the direct route, for 1" length....
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On Mar 31, 2:06pm, Ecnerwal

I once made 30 or so "round nuts" from 1" lengths of 3/4" steel rod, drilled and tapped for 1/4" bolts.
It was a long process considering everything was done in a DIY shop using benchtop tools (miter saw and drill press) and hand tapping.
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Ecnerwal <MyNameForward ReplaceWithMyVices.Com.invalid> wrote:

My next-door neighbor has an old ShopSmith, but getting that going would be more trouble than it's worth. Seems to me that such simple machined parts is a good use for the Internet, like the previously mentioned website.
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Shopsmiths aren't really rigid enough to use as a metal lathe. I know because I've tried. When we need simple machined parts for special projects we simply machine them.
jsw
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On 3/31/11 3:21 PM, John Doe wrote:

I used to work in a TV facility. The guy who ran the set shop and a shop smith. They spent probably 75% as much on that thing as they would've spent on separate power tools. They guy spent probably 75% of his time changing the thing around to its different configurations.
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On 3/31/2011 4:23 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

I don't know; I had an uncle (shortly after WWII) who started a interior decorating Armstrong dealership and cabinet shop who did a tremendous amount of work with one for quite a number of years (altho did have a separate tablesaw so didn't share time w/ the SS for that function). He seemed pretty adept/quick w/ it to me; of course I was fairly young kid back then... :)
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My father and I made a lot of kitchen cabinet doors, wall paneling and T&G flooring on one. The quill feed made setting tenon width easy and the extra table on the end helped support long stiles. It came with the shaper attachment, a decent set of molding cutters and the square morticing drill. They aren't the most rigid of tools, mostly due to the table support rods, but they are BIG, lots of capacity, with the ability to drill lengthwise into the ends of 4"x4"x8' posts or make the hinge and lock cuts in the edge of a door.
They force you to plan well, like completing all the sawing before setting up the drill to mortice the stiles for the rails and muntins.
jsw
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On 3/31/2011 3:21 PM, John Doe wrote:

Doubt seriously you'll find anything w/ the right OD that's thick-walled enough to give the small ID.
You could buy 22mm stock and bore it in many materials including at least some nonmetallics from McMaster Carr or a local (well-supplied) ironmonger if you have one. It's close (but just under 7/8"); that opens up even more possibilities if that's "close enough".
Something w/ a >1/4" (actually almost 5/16") wall thickness just isn't going to be a stock part.
Using the Shopsmith as a centering drill press might be doable; chuck up a short section. I forget whether they've got an option for a open-center lathe chuck or not. Not trying to turn on it, it would likely be good enough for centering unless need extreme precision.
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