Spacers, tubing with very thick walls?

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I need some tubing for a spacer. The outer diameter the same as a 608 bearing, and the inner diameter no greater than 1/4 inch. As light as possible, hopefully no heavier than aluminum. It would be cut to about 1 inch length.
What is a spacer like that called? I could use some keywords.
Thanks.
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John Doe wrote:

bushing?
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Richard Lamb


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On 3/30/2011 10:15 PM, John Doe wrote:

try balsa wood
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John Doe wrote:

they seem to have is 1/4 ID x 3/4 OD tube, or 7/8 rod.
How many do you need? If it's in the hundreds or thousands, the shop where I sit could quote it: http://www.abiengr.com
Cheers! Rich
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Don't know but I suspect you'll have to get something made or make it yourself. Tubing is never exact size, or even perfectly round, and there is often a seam up the inside.
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Stuart Winsor

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To get tubing without a seam, search for "DOM" or "Drawn Over Mandrel" tubing as it is not welded or cast. It is essentially... well... Drawn over a mandrel or precision extruded.
It's what they use when they need the strongest option as well as there are no hard spots created while welding the seam.
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Oh contraire! DOM IS welded! I toured Trent Tube in WI and was amazed at the process. It all starts out as coil stock then it goes through a series of rolls that form it into a tube then it's TiG or laser welded, cut to length then drawn over a mandrel in lengths equal to the length of the mandrel.
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Wow... Very interesting. Never would have thought that is the way it is done.
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If you want seamless, you specify "seamless", which is made by a rolling process.
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Yeah, seamless tube is "drawn over mandrel" of necessity but, drawn over mandrel is not necessarily seamless tube or pipe.
If you are in this racket it helps to know the ASTM specs!
Wolfgang
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FWIW. I had ordered some from McMaster Carr for another purpose, they call aluminum seamless tubing "single-line". Their description is "Formed from a pierced cylinder of material, creating a uniform tube without a weld or seam."
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snipped-for-privacy@usenetlove.invalid says...

Seamless steel is not actually drawn at all--it's spun between two rollers and pressed over a mandrel, with the opening in the center actually resulting from the rolling process and the mandrel being there to provide a smooth inner surface with consistent (more or less) diameter.
Seamless aluminum tubing may be extruded or rolled.
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I think you're speaking of the Mannesmann process, which is fairly recent. But even there, they pierce the tube before the cavity opens up. The conventional process, dating back to the 1920s, starts with actual cone-piercing.
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Aha! Here's a very succinct description of the Mannesmann process:
http://metalpass.com/metaldoc/paper.aspx?docID67
Essentially, they work the steel with rollers until the core is about to rupture from overworking, but then they run the bar over a cone pierce before it actually opens up.
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says...

Yeah, seamless tube is "drawn over mandrel" of necessity but, drawn over mandrel is not necessarily seamless tube or pipe.
If you are in this racket it helps to know the ASTM specs!
Wolfgang
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"Drawn" is more likely to be extruded over a mandrel.
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says...

DOM usually is first resistance-welded -- often submerged-arc welded -- and then drawn over a mandrel to flatten the weld and to produce a fairly uniform strength, hardness, and diameter. DOM may be shrunk from its original diameter by extruding it through a die while it's being drawn over the mandrel.
Plain ERW, like EMT and common tubing of various types, may be sort of drawn or rolled over a mandrel to flatten the weld, but it's not fully reformed over a mandrel.
Seamless is pierced from solid bar and drawn over a mandrel. Once upon a time it was the best tubing, but DOM made from flat sheet is so good today that the performance is nearly identical. And DOM made from flat sheet generally has more uniform thickness.
Some German tubing company had a miniature DOM machine at IMTS one year -- either '78 or '80 -- that was about six feet long and produced soda-straw-sized tube from a flat strip of steel. I would love to have one of those toys. It was really fun to watch.
In terms of pricing, ERW is the cheapest and seamless is the most expensive. There also are some other methods used to make tubing today, including a spinning method that produces a friction lap-weld. These came after my time covering materials so I don't know anything about them.
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wrote:

Tubing, even DOM, is also rarely concentric.
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McMaster Carr, among others, sells standoffs in various diameters and lengths.
http://www.mcmaster.com/#catalog/117/3239/=bo5dc6
RogerN
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I am not exactly sure what size a 608 bearing is but would a 584933377743xr4883.0034 work too?
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Maybe I should have been more specific, but a 608 bearing is a common piece of hardware.
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> but would a
> 584933377743xr4883.0034 work too?
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