source for wide edgebanding?

I'm working on a project to create a large (but lightweight) painted oval structure that will hang over my dining table, with three pendant lamps that will hang below it. I plan to cut an oval 48 x 60 inches from very thin plywood glued to stiff insulation foam, and around the edges I want to glue paintable edgebanding or something similar. But I'm having trouble finding a source for four- to six-inch wide edgebanding. Frama-Tech makes it, but only sells it in 250-foot rolls. Any ideas where I could get 200 inches of six-inch-wide edgebanding?
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On Thu, 10 Dec 2009 19:59:22 -0800 (PST), Dennis McClendon

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1/4" luan ???
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wrote:

Scarf to length.
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Dennis McClendon wrote:

You're going to paint it? Why not heavy paper or light weight cardboard?
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That would work (I think it's basically what paint-grade edgebanding is), but where can I get a single strip 200 inches long? I wanted to have one seam (on the back side) rather than three distributed around the perimeter. I don't know how I'd bend Luan and plastic laminate would always be trying to come apart at the seams.
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How tight a bends would you need? 1/4" Luan bends pretty well. That's why they use it for backyard boat building. Make sure your scarfs are in the straighter sections just to be safe. Epoxy your scarf joints.
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That would work (I think it's basically what paint-grade edgebanding is), but where can I get a single strip 200 inches long?
I wanted to have one seam (on the back side) rather than three distributed around the perimeter. I don't know how I'd bend Luan and plastic laminate would always be trying to come apart at the seams.
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butcher block paper comes in up to 1000' rolls. talk to your local deli guy?



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I've come late to this conversation, so if my comment is incorrect, it's because I misunderstood the question.
If I was planning to paint the edge of a shelf made from particle board or plywood, I'd consider giving it a good sanding and then filling it in with Bondo or wood putty. A good sanding would then result in a smooth finish, ready for paint.
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Dennis McClendon wrote:

As charlie said, butcher block paper is a possibility. Another is wallpaper...I'm thinking of the plain, heavy stuff meant as an underlay on rough walls.
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On Thu, 10 Dec 2009 19:59:22 -0800 (PST), Dennis McClendon

Many lumber yards have rolls of wide preglued (iron-on) veneer, from something like 6" to 24" that can be cut to what ever width you'd like. I think they're only 96" long so you'd need three peices, but sounds like it would work for you.
HTH Jeffo
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You want "Benderboard". Any pro plywood source will carry benderboard of some type. It is thin springy plywood, made to be bent about a frame. You can roll that suuff up into a 12" tube easy. It usually comes with the bendability in one dimension or the other, so be sure to the kind that bends along the long length.
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Like these both smooth and kerfed (thicker) types available.
http://www.plywoodcompany.com/application/common/store/category.aspx?categoryid=20&gclid=CJ7o1-Csz54CFQMUawodfjp4CA

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Some interesting ideas. Keep 'em coming.
Wallpaper (finally) occurred to me this morning as well. I'll have to see what I can find that's good and thick.
I guess I don't know what "butcher block paper" is. Ordinary white butcher paper would, of course, be entirely too thin.
I'm curious why those of you recommending various sheet goods such as Luaun wouldn't simply recommend cutting strips of a 4 x 8 veneer sheet, which can more easily be curved.
The problem with all the sheet goods is that I'd end up with three seams. There is no flat portion to a 4x6-foot oval.
I used Bendyboard to create a living room wall last year, and may have some scraps left. But in the direction of the kerfs means that each strip would only be 48 inches, giving me four seams instead of one. And I'd have 1000 tiny kerfs to fill with wood putty on the exposed edge.
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So use an 1/8" ply either bender or normal, place the seams at the apex of each arc in the oval and add a small vertical detail strip of molding covering each seam.
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I'm not following. How would you keep the molding from being visible when you looked at the finished piece?
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I coulda swore you said your were going to PAINT it.
If well done a scarf in ply is going to have very minimal physical depression or deformity if any. If there is any, just fill it before you paint.
" painted oval structure "
A nice scarfing diagram.
http://www.oneoceankayaks.com/stitchglue/plyshophtm/scarfjig2.htm
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I was suggesting not hiding it but adding a detail at the joint. Probably not what you want but was just throwing out ideas. I think the fill and sand method as others suggested is going to be the trick. Use a heavy primer and sand that too for a real smooth finish.
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On Fri, 11 Dec 2009 19:16:50 -0800 (PST), "SonomaProducts.com"

Back up the joints instead of using mouldings. Put the joints where the line is closest to straight (least curvature) then simply fill the joint and paint.
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If painting I do things the easy way. On particle board I coat with dry wall mud. Sand smooth then primer and paint. Looks great. WW
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