SOT- Feelin' Guilty about buying Chinese This n That...

Page 5 of 5  
On Fri, 15 Oct 2004 12:24:59 GMT, "Leon"

That's my tune - mostly. But I find it easier to tell this to a group of 25 yr olds rather than a 55 yr old with a mortgage, college bills, possible medical costs, perhaps a parent in need of long-term expensive care. And wondering how long it'll be before his 401K retirement plans get back on track after the bubble burst.
I've said it before - I'm in IT and I think about this everyday. What am I doing to ensure I can provide for my family?
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I'm 50 now and always kept in the back of my mind, I could be replaced or this type business is not going to last unless changes are made. I am certainly glad that I knew this when I was 23.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15 Oct 2004 05:14:40 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thesafety.net (Ray Kinzler) wrote:

This is something Brits of my Dad's generation realised twenty years ago, when that bloody Thatcher woman closed down manufacturing in favour of a "service" economy. You can't all survive just by taking in each other's washing. If no-one makes anything any more, then the whole business eventually grinds to a halt. Outsourcing manufacturing to China is perhaps a bigger issue in the USA than in the UK, simply because we already lost so much of our manufacturing 15 years ago.
--
Smert' spamionam

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15 Oct 2004 05:14:40 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thesafety.net (Ray Kinzler) wrote:

A good article and a book that's been long overdue. After listening to Ralph Nader speak to this very subject last night, I really wish we had some realistic hope of getting him elected.
With the almost-total loss now of our manufacturing base, our economy is based on smoke&mirrors, hamburgers and "information technology" (which is essentially nothing).
The only people who really believe in the 'global economy' are the very few who are enlarging their personal fortunes. For the rest of us it's disaster, and NAFTA is the most close-to-home example I can think of at the moment.
One of the shining examples of how bad NAFTA is, is that the state of Michigan cannot stop Canada from hauling their trash and hazardous waste across our borders. Now, this is a country with a land mass pretty much equivalent to that of the United States and a population of some 30 million. Surely, somewhere, in all that wasteland, theres room for a landfill of their very own. And on top of all that, one very greedy and uncaring US developer is now drilling a 'deep well', into which he intends to let Canada inject even more hazardous waste. The only thing that can stop this is action by the US congress, and the liklihood of that happening are just slightly less than me having Britney Spears show up on my door tonight for a date.
(Soapbox now properly stowed. Thanks for listening.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 15 Oct 2004 05:14:40 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@thesafety.net (Ray Kinzler) wrote:

Ultimately, in a global economy, most of the world must be just barely above subsistence level. As countries such as China raise there standard of living those on the US and Europe must drop to compensate.
The good news is that as the standard of living drops the value of our time drops and it is less costly to spend many hours in the woodshop. The bad news is that you will be doing it neander style. (some may consider that good news as well)
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I don't think so. Currently, Chinese government is trying many things to boost internal consumption. Things like many long stretch of holiday weeks to allow people to travel far and away to spend money. Basically, China cannot rely on foreign market to cure China unemployment problem; the foreign market is simply not large enough for all the products from China. China will have to cure the problem by increasing domestic consumption. With China already in WTO, this means US companies have a chance to get a piece of the increasing Chinese market. The key is to sell products that match the need in that market. US can sell raw material to China, or US can sell finished products from highly automated factories (to keep cost down).
This will be a win-win situation. There will be short term pain both in China and in other countries. In the long term, the global market will be bigger. When we add the growing India market into the mix, the global market will be even bigger. And when we add a recovering Russia into the mix, the global market will be bigger and bigger...
Of course, US would lose the opportunity of gaining Chinese market share to other countries if US was only concerning of what market they would lose instead of what market they would gain. Luckily, this doesn't seem to be what is happening considering the fact that large number of US companies are actively marketing in China.
Jay Chan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18 Oct 2004 10:22:26 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com (Jay Chan) wrote:

There simply aren't enough resources in the world for all of the population to exist at U.S./Europe standard of living.
Tim Douglass
http://www.DouglassClan.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
(Jay Chan) wrote:

he's right, I did the math..... oh, .wait a minute, do you carry the two?........divide by the inverse? Well it's simple anyway......trust me, I am enlightened
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Not sure about Europe. But I would not suggest any country to follow US standard of living -- just too wasteful. Whatever energy saving in using better isulation material and efficient heating system is being used up by building bigger and bigger hourses. I am sure this world will collapse if every country tries to duplicate US standard of living. The trick is not to exactly follow US standard of living.
For example, if every Chinese wants to build a house like a regular house in US suburban neighborhood. China will run out of land in a very short time. Therefore, this is impractical to expect a house like this in China -- there is just not enough land. Something that a regular Chinese should hope for is a multiple floors apartment building. Actually, this is not a bad thing to live in a city or a big town considering the fact that many US people love to live in New York City (if they can afford an apartment in NYC).
I believe one of the reason why many US people want to move out from the cities is to avoid the racial tension and the consequence of racial tension. This situation is simply not applicable to many other countries. Hence, there is less likely to have a large number of people moving out of the cities in other countries.
In other words, there is really no reason to expect everyone in the world to _be_able_ to live like US people, nor expect everyone in the world to _want_ to live like US people.
In long term, people in China will get a good living standard, and they will get this in a different way from US. They will be living in MEGA cities, instead of living in big houses in suburban.
Obviously, if someone is living in an apartment in a city, he will need fewer furnitures to fill up the empty space, will not need a lot of applicants, will not need a convection oven or a large refrigrator (because he will eat out more often than not), will not need to fool around with a lawn mower, will not need to drive a car, ...etc. He can cut down a lot of spending without affecting his quality of life.
Of course, if we strictly limit to "US standard of living", we can safely assume that the rest of the world cannot afford it.
Jay Chan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
If this makes you feel better, Chinese are buying stuffs from many other Asian countries (most of them are US allies), assembling those stuffs together and selling the finished products to US. In a way, the large trade deficit with China is simply a repackaging of the large trade deficit that US used to have with other Asian countries. Now the trade deficit takes a detour to China and get re-labeled as a trade deficit with China.
China has very little natural resource other than human resource. If China needs to sell something, China needs to import it from foreign countries in a form of raw materials or partially finished components. That is the reason China has trade deficits with the rest of the Asian countries (particularly Japan). In the end, China has a small surplus; this is not like China is rolling in money. Please bear in mind that China sells a lot of stuff to US, but US also sells a lot of stuffs (like military equipments) to Asian countries, and those Asian countries sells a lot of stuffs to China. This is like a loop. Therefore, we cannot simply look at the trade balance with China in isolation. We need to look at the big picture.
If US wants to improve its overall trade balance, US needs to sell more stuff to the rest of the world. US has plenty of raw materials that can sell -- start by opening more oil fields in Alaska. This is a question of whether US (government and people) has the will to do this.
The other way is to cut the defense budget or downsize the government, and channel the money (in the form of tax saving) to private sectors in order to increase the capital investment on US industrials. This is to improve the productivity of US industrials. Honestly, I don't know if this will work though (US companies could send the money aboard and opened a state of the art factory in China); therefore, I don't say anything more on this.
There are other things that US can do well and could have sold well. High tech military equipments are things that US is doing very well and could have sold well. Afterall, US has spent so much money developing those weapons. But for one reason or another, US cannot simply sell these high tech stuffs to any country discriminably. This means US has very great stuffs that US could have sold but cannot sell.
In other words, there are many great stuffs that US could have sold, but cannot sell for some reasons. This will go a long way explaining why US has a large trade deficit.
If US doesn't want to sell more stuffs to the world, US will need to find a way to buy fewer stuffs from the rest of the world either voluntarily or being forced on. Seem like if the budget deficit keeps increasing like this, US currency may drop its value. IF this happened, we would not afford to buy that many stuffs from the rest of the world, and the trade deficit would be taken care of in this way. Oh well...
Jay Chan
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.